Fat Lies Part 1

 


BIG FAT LIES   
Part 1 of 12

Here is the first part of your 12-part mini-course, BIG FAT LIES.

In this lesson, you will learn the physiological truth about why very low calorie diets cannot work long term and why they are only quick fixes that lead to eventual weight re-gain…  

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Fat Loss Lie #1: “You have to starve yourself to get a lean body”
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What if we told you that very low calorie diets will actually make you fatter in the long term, and that there’s an almost embarrassingly simple way that you can eat more and still burn more fat?

Yes, it sounds too good to be true, but you’re about to see the science behind it, and we’ve got the real-world results to prove it, so read on.

To get rid of fat, the laws of energy balance and thermodynamics declare that you have to consume fewer calories than you burn. Sorry, there’s no way around it.

There’s no such thing as “calories don’t count.” Run for cover the next time you hear that claim because it’s absolutely false and any scientist will tell you that.

You must have a “calorie deficit” to burn fat off your body. However, the fatal flaw in most popular diet programs is that the calorie deficit is too aggressive or too extreme.

Have you ever been told that to get a lean body you had to eat 1200 calories a day or 1000 calories a day or even less? Did you ever just get FED UP with no results and tell yourself, “That’s it, I’m NOT going to eat ANY thing,” because you were desperate to get the pounds off as fast as possible?

Yeah, sure, it works in the beginning, because there’s a HUGE calorie deficit at first, but there’s also a HUGE irony:

When you cut your calories too far, eventually YOUR BODY ADAPTS.

If you’re a Star Trek fan, it’s kind of like the BORG, where a phaser weapon works against the alien BORG creatures once, but then they adapt, and soon the same phaser blast no longer does anything.

Well, diets are kind of like that, unfortunately?

You “fire” a low calorie diet at your body and it zaps off some weight in the beginning. But then your body figures out what’s going on. Your body doesn’t care that you want to look good in a swimsuit; your body thinks you’re under attack! Your body thinks you’re about to starve to death!

When you fire something extreme at your body (like hardly eating), you trigger a series of “defense mechanisms” collectively known as “the starvation response.”

 

 

 

When you go into this starvation mode, here are some of the consequences:

1. Your body releases fewer fat-releasing and fat-burning enzymes such as hormone sensitive lipase and lipoprotein lipase.

2. Your fat cells release less of the hormone leptin – which is the signal that tells your brain you are well fed and not starving (it’s the “anti-starvation” hormone)

3. Fat burning hormones crash, including your levels of T3 (no, not the latest Arnold terminator movie, T3 is the active form of thyroid hormone, the important “metabolism-regulating hormone” that you’ve probably heard about before).

4. You lose muscle. Muscle is metabolically-active tissue, which means it takes a lot of energy just to keep it. When you’re “starving,” you’re in an “energy crisis”, so excess muscle is the LAST thing you need. Muscle becomes expendable, and your body cannibalizes your own lean tissue.

5. Appetite hormones rage out of control. When you’re starving, a part of your brain called the hypothalamus switches into high gear and flips the appetite switch, sometimes to the point where you become ravenous and cannot fight these physiological cravings with willpower.  (We don’t believe ‘Will Power’ really exists –  we’ll explain that one later)

Bottom line: It’s hormonally, metabolically and physiologically impossible to achieve permanent fat loss by starving yourself.

And that’s the first BIG LIE:

Any program that’s extremely low in calories may work in the short term, but the “honeymoon” never lasts for long.

In the long run, very low calorie diets can actually make you fatter. Eventually, they lead to binge eating and weight re-gain and you end up with less muscle and a slower metabolism than when you started.

The TRUTH is, you DON’T have to starve yourself to get a lean body.

 In fact, you can eat more and burn more fat.

Here’s how:

1. Avoid very low calorie diets.

Before going on any diet, look at the recommended calories. You’ll probably discover that in most cases, you are required to slash your calories to “starvation” levels (1200 or less for women, 1800 or less for men, and active people need even more.

2. Make sure your calorie intake is customized.

Depending on your activity level, age and gender, your calorie needs may be much higher or much lower than the average person. Any diet program recommending the same amount of calories for everyone, you should see a red flag and stay away. It could be perfect for someone else, but starvation level for you.

3. Decrease your calories just a little below maintenance.

Decrease your calories conservatively – only about 20% below your daily maintenance level. A mild calorie cut doesn’t trigger the starvation response as much.

For example: If you’re female and you maintain your weight on 2150 calories per day, a 20% deficit is 1720 calories per day (perfect)

Conventional diets might have you slash to 1000 or 1200 calories per day or less without emphasis on exercise (which is madness)

4. Increase your calorie deficit more by increasing activity

If you only cut calories slightly below maintenance, then how do you reduce body fat without the process taking forever?

Simple, you BURN more calories and increase your deficit by increasing your activity. (No brainer simple!)

First, if you’re not doing so already, you should aim for three days per week of strength training with weights.

Second, you should do at least three days per week of moderate to vigorous cardiovascular exercise.

Third, if you wish to accelerate fat loss more, or if you need to break a progress plateau, you bump up your activity even further by adding additional cardio sessions or increasing the intensity or duration of your current workouts.

It also helps to get more physical activity in general, and to participate in physical hobbies, sports or recreational activities that you enjoy.

Bottom line:    The first secret to permanent fat loss is

 BURN THE FAT, don’t STARVE THE FAT!

There are some exercise physiologists today, who call this concept maintaining a “high energy flux.” That’s a fancy way of saying, “Eat more, burn more,” (instead of “eat less, be a couch potato”), and that’s what the Burn The Fat philosophy is all about.

If you’d like to learn more, visit our website and watch your email for the next instalment of BIG FAT LIES – there are 11 more great lessons on the way!

Jax Allen  Program Director

Fitness Solutions uk

info@fitnesssolutionsuk.com

Top 10 Lo Carb Mistakes

Top Ten Low-Carb Diet Mistakes

Common Problems and How to Correct Them

 

No big surprise – we all make mistakes. From the newest newbie, to the person who has been low-carbing for years, we all encounter bumps in the road, or our experiments don’t turn out well. Here are 10 of the most common mistakes I see in low-carb eating.

 

1) Getting Off on the Wrong Foot

You don’t have to take a college class to understand low-carb eating. But some people assume it means they should just eat meat all day (or other low-carb myths) or don’t know where the carbs are lurking. This is really a recipe for problems. Everyone needs some basic knowledge about how reducing carbohydrates works, what foods have carbohydrates, and how to eat a balanced low-carb diet.

 

2) Giving Up Too Quickly

There are lots of different approaches to low-carb eating, and there are often mistakes made at first, as you try to find one that works for you, or to modify an existing one. There is a tendency to over-react a bit when everything doesn’t go perfectly, and give up. A prime example of this is eating too little carbohydrate at first, suffering carb crash, and deciding low-carb isn’t for you. This is a shame, when a simple adjustment can usually get you through the first week comfortably, to the great rewards at the end of it.

 

3) Not Enough Vegetables

Time and time again, people tell me they don’t feel good eating a diet lower in carb, and it turns out they are eating almost no vegetables or fruit. This will not work in the long run. My low-carb pyramid has vegetables at the base – in other words, you should be eating more of them than any other food! Fruit, too, especially fruit low in sugar, has its place in a complete low-carb diet.

 

4) Not Enough Fat

This can be a real problem. Despite some effort to get out the word about so-called “healthy fats”, hardly a day goes by that I don’t see or hear a negative message about fats in the diet. This leads some to attempt a low-fat version of a low-carb diet. At the beginning, some can even manage it, if they are using up a lot of their own fat (as opposed to eating it). However, fat loss inevitably slows down, and people can then become hungry if they don’t add some fat to their diets. Nothing will sabotage a diet faster than hunger. So don’t let this happen to you!

 

5) Not Enough Fiber

Eating enough vegetables and fruit goes a long way towards ensuring you are getting enough fiber in your diet. There are other low-carb sources of fiber as well, and it’s good to learn about them.

 

6) Eating Too Much

It’s true that you don’t have to count calories on a low-carb diet. But that doesn’t mean calories don’t count! The great thing about low-carb eating is that our appetites “turn down,” allowing us to eat fewer calories without getting hungry. Some people make the mistake, though, of thinking they can just keep eating and eating and still lose weight as long as the food is low-carb. Let your appetite be your guide – eat when you are hungry, and stop when you are comfortable.

 

7) Lack of Planning

When you are first on a new way of eating, you’ll run into old habits that need to be changed to new healthier ones. No longer can you mindlessly hit the vending machine or drive-thru. This is a good thing: Pausing to re-consider our habits is a constructive step towards making improvements in our lives. But in the case of eating, it’s important to plan ahead for awhile, until our new habits come naturally. Nothing will sabotage your goals more quickly than realizing that you’re hungry but you don’t know what to eat.

8) Getting into a Rut

There are people who eat the same things day after day, and like it that way. But frankly, most of us like variety, and will get bored very quickly if that is not built into the way we eat. There is no reason for not eating a wide variety of foods, and in fact, a varied diet is likely to be better for us nutritionally. Every cuisine on the planet has low-carb options – you just need to skip the starch and sugar. Also, most dishes can be “de-carbed.” If you want to figure out a way to have your favourite flavours.

9) Problem Ingredients in “Low-Carb” Packaged Foods

Be wary of meal replacement bars, ice cream, and other “treats” labeled low-carb or sugar-free. They often contain ingredients such as maltitol (the worst offender) which are just as bad as sugar in a lot of bodies. In general, products that talk about their “net carbs” or “impact carbs” deserve close scrutiny of the ingredients, and careful experimentation.

 

10) Carb Creep

You’re eating low-carb. You’re feeling great, and the weight is dropping off as if by magic. You’re not hungry between meals! You have energy! You can concentrate better! Wheee! You think you’ll have a piece of toast! It doesn’t matter! You still feel great! You think you’ll have some ice cream! Hey! You’re still losing weight! A little sugar in the coffee can’t hurt, can it? Maybe not, but…uh oh. Something has sent you over your own personal carb limit. Suddenly, you’re having cravings, you’re hungrier, you’re gaining weight, and you’re in a vicious circle that’s hard to break of eating carbs, being hungrier, eating more carbs…ugh.

Sometimes it happens more subtly, but it’s common to let more and more carbs creep in, sometimes unawares. If that happens, it’s time to take stock and probably start over, at least for a few days, to break that cycle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonus #11) No Exercise

There is a temptation to leave exercise out when talking about low-carb diets, because often people can be successful at first while staying sedentary. However, there are several reasons for talking about exercise in any diet discussion (Atkins called it “non-negotiable”). One is that exercise lowers insulin resistance- this is probably partly why exercise alone will tend to help many people lose a few pounds. The second is that exercise is good for our bodies in so many ways. And the third is that while we can lose weight by diet alone, at least to some extent, we are very unlikely to be able to maintain a significant weight loss without exercise.

 

Short, under 45 minutes, but very intense workouts will build and maintain your lean shape and rev’ up your metabolism so you will keep your new lower body weight.