Are You Too Bendy?

Joint Hypermobility:

How many of you out there have hypermobile joints?

Mobility tends to be thought of as a good thing, however when you have more then the normal amount of mobility in your body, this can lead to problems. Hypermobility only becomes a syndrome when it starts to produce symptoms- it is then know as Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or JHS.

JHS is a inheritable disorder of the connective tissue that can predispose to joint pain, soft tissue injury and joint instability. Often Joint Hypermobility patients are mis-diagnosed. In fact in a recent survey of the Hypermobility Syndrome Association 52% of 251 patients waited over 10 years from the onset of their symptoms to get the right diagnosis (Ross and Grahame 2011). Misdiagnosis can lead to inappropriate or potential harmful treatment and potentially a reversible downward spiral of immobility, deconditioning and despair.

How is hypermobility diagnosed?

Joint hypermobility is diagnosed with 2 scales, the Beighton and the Brighton. The Beighton scale is a test which is scored out of 9. One point is gained for each side of the body for the first 4 manoeuvres. The maximum score is 9 if all movements are positive. Try these tests and record your score

Beighton Scale: see diagram….

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1) Passive dorsiflexion of the little finger to more than 90 degrees

2) Can your thumb reach your forearm

3) Do your elbows hyperextend more than 10 degrees

4) Do your knees hyperextend more than 10 degrees

5) Can you place your hands flat on the floor without bending your knees

If you have joint pain, have dislocated one or more joints and score most or all of these maybe you need a full test with your health practitioner !

Jax

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