THIS time I WILL lose………

 
 "THIS time I will lose ....... pounds of fat 
      and gain ……….. pounds of muscle !"


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Autumn will be here before we know it, 
the evenings will draw in and we will 
start thinking about the end of the year. 
 If you’re like me I also start to think 
about doing something different to do, 
and as I’m not looking to go to evening 
classes I will set goals to get in better
shape before Christmas.
 
These tips really work…   Read Them… Use Them… 
 
 
1. Life Style Plan
Use a lifestyle fat loss plan rather than a crash-diet
you know will just let you down. 
Remember every crash/mad/ weird/Detox diet you have EVER
tried didn’t work either.
 
Let's get real:  Almost every diet plan is based on getting
your excess weight off as fast as possible...
 
AND THAT KEEPS US FAT!
 
My plan includes eating your favourite foods every week.  
Dropping body fat quick enough to keep me happy especially
at the beginning - YET  Slow enough to keep your BODY HAPPY.
 
 
If your body is happy your fat loss will stay steady and not
 rush back as soon as you return into a normal pattern.
 
 
 
2. Write Goals in Your Journal
Write your goals down in two different formats to take
advantage of the way your brain processes information.
 
Your mind is a marvellous machine... but you have to know
 how it works to take full advantage of the power between
 your ears.
 
Just "speaking" a goal or thinking about it is NOT going
 to get you where you want to go.  Most of us know this.
 
And perhaps you take the next, crucial step:
You WRITE DOWN your goals.
 
That's great... YET that's only 1/4 the battle.
 
Here's what you must do:
 
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Write your body goals down two ways. 
Keep both goals in different locations 
around the house
where you will see them and read them 
frequently.
 
 
#1:  PRESENT TENSE:
 Here, you state your goal as if it has already happened.
 The TRICK here is to do so without lying to yourself. 
 
A lot of "Self-Help" gurus suggest saying things like,
 "I am fit, trim and beautiful!"  Yet if you are NOT fit
 or trim YET and you KNOW it, this idea can backfire... 
especially if you love honesty.
 
Most of us love honesty, so let's BE HONEST with ourselves
 while still taking advantage of the power that future-tense
 goals can offer.
 
Write your goal like this:
 
"I see December 1, 2013, and I see my body: Fit,
trim, and beautiful!"
 
Same strategy - better results. 
Since you can imagine December 1, 2013, your mind will be more
empowered to imagine the BODY you desire along with it. 
 
 
 
 
#2:  PROCESS-TENSE:  
This is perhaps the BEST way to state a goal -- 
as one in the process of becoming reality. 
This is the best way to keep
it real as well. : )
 
Here's what you say:
 
"I am in the process of becoming more fit and trim by December 1, 2013!"
 
Your body will start following your mind's directive and 
help you achieve your goals. 
 
 
 
3. Finally, buddy-up!
 
If you have a family member or friend that shares your 
desires for a better body in 2013, team up with them. 
Studies show that friends and trainers that keep you 
accountable increase your success for long-term weight 
loss by over 400%.
Use my Facebook group to meet other likeminded health &
fitness enthusiasts  Facebook.com/Jax Allen and request 
to join our Fatloss group.
 
So buddy- up and make a promise to train 3 times a week every week,
 together No Excuses!  You’ll not be able to let your plan slip. 
Weigh-in regularly and keep your results coming.
 
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Remember, if you train with me - there 
are rewards for bringing along friends 
and work mates  – they get a FREE trial –and when they sign up you get a FREE 
session credit or two.
 
 
 
However:
 
Your FIRST STEP... and most important for success, is to have your lifestyle-friendly diet plan ready to go.  
Be Honest with yourself – make clear decisions about what you want 
to achieve and how you will make it happen and you will !!
 
JaxAllenFitness.com ©

How Many Calories Can You Eat and Still Lose Weight

You’re Not Eating Enough Calories to Lose Weight

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The majority of the time when you’re having a problem losing weight, it’s not because you aren’t making good food choices. The reason your weight loss has stalled is because you’re not eating enough calories to lose weight.

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What Happens When You’re Not Eating Enough Calories?

When most people start dieting, they slash their calories and add a large amount of exercise to their daily routine. That’s fine, but they usually cut their calories way too low. Add in the extra exercise, and all of a sudden you have an extreme calorie deficit that is working against you.
Not eating enough calories causes many metabolic changes. Your body is a smart machine and senses any large decrease in dietary intake. Your large calorie deficit might work for a few days or even weeks, but eventually your body will wake up and sound alarms that it needs to conserve energy. It doesn’t want to just waste away. It needs energy to survive.

So, what does your body do when it senses prolonged energy restriction?

Thyroid Hormone Production Slows
Your thyroid hormone is responsible for fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism among other things. Your body has the ability to slow down thyroid output in an effort to maintain energy balance

Muscle Mass Decreases
Muscles need lots of calories to maintain. After a few days of extreme calorie deficit, it is one of the first things that your body gets rid of. Your body needs your stored fat and the muscle can be spared. It breaks down the muscle tissue and uses it for energy.

Testosterone Levels Fall
An important hormone for both men and women, testosterone is just one of many hormones that are affected with severe calorie restriction .
Testosterone is important to muscle tissue. Without it, it becomes that much harder to maintain, let alone increase muscle mass.

Fatloss Hormones Reduce
Leptin, one of many energy regulating hormones. More importantly, it’s a “hunger” hormone that tells you whether to eat or not. High leptin levels signal that it’s OK to stop eating, while low leptin levels are a signal to eat more.

Energy Levels Decrease
There are many physical actions your body takes when you don’t eat enough calories to lose weight, but there are also some mental ones.
Neurotransmitter production is limited, which can lead to a lack of motivation. It’s your body’s way of telling you to “slow down” – conserve your energy.

How Many Calories Should You Be Eating?
Your goal should be to eat as many calories as possible and still lose weight. You always want to start high and then come down with your calorie intake. It’s much easier to do this than increasing calories after your weight loss has stalled and you’ve lost all your motivation.

There is no perfect number. Each person’s metabolism is different. Calorie calculators are a good starting point, but they can’t take into account all your individualistic variables.

The problem is most people want the weight gone, and they want it gone now. Weight loss is a patience game. It takes time and consistency to make it work. Losing 2lbs per week is the most I would aim for. At this pace, it will ensure that the majority of your weight loss is coming from stored body fat instead of muscle. You will also give yourself the best chance to build muscle while you lose fat, which is what you should be striving to do.

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To find out what portion of your weight loss is fat and what portion is muscle, I highly recommend you book in for a body composition analysis session. It will make weight loss much easier if you can hold onto your muscle, or even put some on in the process.

So, if your progress has stalled, but you think you’re eating the right foods and exercising intensely, it’s more than likely that you’re not eating enough calories to lose weight.

Eat as much as you can, get in as many nutrients as possible, and your weight loss will start moving forward again.

Follow me On Twitter @Jaxallenfitness

Friend me on Facebook. Jax Allen

Sugary Drinks and Obesity Fact Sheet

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Time to Focus on Healthier Drinks
Steps that consumers, soft drink makers, and government can take to cut back on sugary drinks.

An article from Harvard Public Health

The Problem: Sugary Drinks Are a Major Contributor to the Obesity Epidemic
Two out of three adults and one out of three children in the United States are overweight or obese, (1,2) and the nation spends an estimated $190 billion a year treating obesity-related health conditions. (3) Rising consumption of sugary drinks has been a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. (4) A typical 20-ounce soda contains 15 to 18 teaspoons of sugar and upwards of 240 calories. A 64-ounce fountain cola drink could have up to 700 calories. (5) People who drink this “liquid candy” do not feel as full as if they had eaten the same calories from solid food and do not compensate by eating less. (6)

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Beverage companies in the US spent roughly $3.2 billion marketing carbonated beverages in 2006, with nearly a half billion dollars of that marketing aimed directly at youth ages 2–17. (7) And each year, youth see hundreds of television ads for sugar-containing drinks. In 2010, for example, preschoolers viewed an average of 213 ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks, while children and teens watched an average of 277 and 406 ads, respectively. (8) Yet the beverage industry aggressively rebuffs suggestions that its products and marketing tactics play any role in the obesity epidemic. (9) Adding to the confusion, beverage industry-funded studies are four to eight times more likely to show a finding favorable to industry than independently-funded studies. (10) This fact sheet assembles key scientific evidence on the link between sugary drink consumption and obesity.


The Evidence: Soft Drink Consumption Is Rising and Harms Health

Sugary drink portion sizes have risen dramatically over the past 40 years, and children and adults are drinking more soft drinks than ever.

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Before the 1950s, standard soft-drink bottles were 6.5 ounces. In the 1950s, soft-drink makers introduced larger sizes, including the 12-ounce can, which became widely available in 1960. (11) By the early 1990s, 20-ounce plastic bottles became the norm. (12) Today, contour-shaped plastic bottles are available in even larger sizes, such as the 1.25-liter (42-ounce) bottle introduced in 2011. (13)
In the 1970s, sugary drinks made up about 4% of US daily calorie intake; by 2001, that had risen to about 9%. (14)

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Children and youth in the US averaged 224 calories per day from sugary beverages in 1999 to 2004—nearly 11% of their daily calorie intake. (15) From 1989 to 2008, calories from sugary beverages increased by 60% in children ages 6 to 11, from 130 to 209 calories per day, and the percentage of children consuming them rose from 79% to 91%. (16)
On any given day, half the people in the U.S. consume sugary drinks; 1 in 4 get at least 200 calories from such drinks; and 5% get at least 567 calories—equivalent to four cans of soda. (17) Sugary drinks (soda, energy, sports drinks) are the top calorie source in teens’ diets (226 calories per day), beating out pizza (213 calories per day). (18)
Sugary drinks increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and gout.

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A 20-year study on 120,000 men and women found that people who increased their sugary drink consumption by one 12-ounce serving per day gained more weight over time—on average, an extra pound every 4 years—than people who did not change their intake. (19) Other studies have found a significant link between sugary drink consumption and weight gain in children. (20) One study found that for each additional 12-ounce soda children consumed each day, the odds of becoming obese increased by 60% during 1½ years of follow-up. (21)

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People who consume sugary drinks regularly—1 to 2 cans a day or more—have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely have such drinks. (22) Risks are even greater in young adults and Asians.
A study that followed 40,000 men for two decades found that those who averaged one can of a sugary beverage per day had a 20% higher risk of having a heart attack or dying from a heart attack than men who rarely consumed sugary drinks. (23) A related study in women found a similar sugary beverage–heart disease link. (24)

A 22-year study of 80,000 women found that those who consumed a can a day of sugary drink had a 75% higher risk of gout than women who rarely had such drinks. (25) Researchers found a similarly-elevated risk in men. (26)
Cutting back on sugary drinks can help people control their weight.

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Studies in children and adults have found that reducing sugary drink consumption can lead to better weight control among those who are initially overweight. (27,28)
References
1. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Flegal KM. Prevalence of obesity and trends in body mass index among US children and adolescents, 1999-2010. JAMA. 2012;307:483-90.

2. Flegal KM, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Ogden CL. Prevalence of obesity and trends in the distribution of body mass index among US adults, 1999-2010. JAMA. 2012;307:491-7.

3. Cawley J, Meyerhoefer C. The medical care costs of obesity: an instrumental variables approach. J Health Econ. 2012;31:219-30.

4. Institute of Medicine. Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2012.

5. US Department of Agriculture. Nutrient data for 14400, Carbonated beverage, cola, contains caffeine. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 24. 2012. Accessed June 21, 2012, http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/4337

6. Pan A, Hu FB. Effects of carbohydrates on satiety: differences between liquid and solid food. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2011;14:385-90.

7. US Federal Trade Commission. Marketing Food to Children and Adolescents: A Review of Industry Expenditures, Activities, and Self-Regulation. Washington, DC: US Federal Trade Commission; 2008.

8. Harris J, Schwartz MB, Brownell KD, et al. Sugary Drink FACTS: Evaluating Sugary Drink Nutrition and Marketing to Youth. New Haven, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity; 2011.

9. Coca-Cola: Don’t blame us for obesity epidemic! The New York Daily News June 8, 2012.

10. Lesser LI, Ebbeling CB, Goozner M, Wypij D, Ludwig DS. Relationship between funding source and conclusion among nutrition-related scientific articles. PLoS Med. 2007;4:e5.

11. The Coca-Cola Company. History of Bottling. Accessed June 21, 2012, http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/ourcompany/historybottling.html

12. Jacobson M. Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks are Harming Americans’ Health. Washignton, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest; 2005.

13. The Coca-Cola Company. 1.25 For 125! New 1.25 Liter Coca-Cola Package Rolls Out as Part of Brand’s 125th Anniversary Celebration 2011. Accessed June 25, 2012, http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/dynamic/press_center/2011/05/125-for-125.html

14. Nielsen SJ, Popkin BM. Changes in beverage intake between 1977 and 2001. Am J Prev Med. 2004;27:205-10.

15. Wang YC, Bleich SN, Gortmaker SL. Increasing caloric contribution from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices among US children and adolescents, 1988-2004. Pediatrics. 2008;121:e1604-14.

16. Lasater G, Piernas C, Popkin BM. Beverage patterns and trends among school-aged children in the US, 1989-2008. Nutr J. 2011;10:103.

17. Ogden CL, Kit BK, Carroll MD, Park S. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008<. NCHS Data Brief. 2011:1-8.

18. National Cancer Institute. Mean Intake of Energy and Mean Contribution (kcal) of Various Foods Among US Population, by Age, NHANES 2005–06. Accessed June 21, 2012, http://riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/

19. Mozaffarian D, Hao T, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Changes in diet and lifestyle and long-term weight gain in women and men. N Engl J Med. 2011;364:2392-404.

20. Malik VS, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sugar-sweetened beverages and BMI in children and adolescents: reanalyses of a meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:438-9; author reply 9-40.

21. Ludwig DS, Peterson KE, Gortmaker SL. Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis. Lancet. 2001;357:505-8.

22. Malik VS, Popkin BM, Bray GA, Despres JP, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Diabetes Care. 2010;33:2477-83.

23. de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption, incident coronary heart disease, and biomarkers of risk in men. Circulation. 2012;125:1735-41, S1.

24. Fung TT, Malik V, Rexrode KM, Manson JE, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1037-42.

25. Choi HK, Willett W, Curhan G. Fructose-rich beverages and risk of gout in women. JAMA. 2010;304:2270-8.

26. Choi HK, Curhan G. Soft drinks, fructose consumption, and the risk of gout in men: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2008;336:309-12.

27. Ebbeling CB, Feldman HA, Osganian SK, Chomitz VR, Ellenbogen SJ, Ludwig DS. Effects of decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on body weight in adolescents: a randomized, controlled pilot study. Pediatrics. 2006;117:673-80.

28. Tate DF, Turner-McGrievy G, Lyons E, et al. Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults: main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95:555-63.

You’re Not Eating Enough Calories to Lose Weight

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The majority of the time when you’re having a problem losing weight, it’s not because you aren’t making good food choices. The reason your weight loss has stalled is because you’re not eating enough calories to lose weight.

What Happens When You’re Not Eating Enough Calories?

When most people start dieting, they slash their calories and add a large amount of exercise to their daily routine. That’s fine, but they usually cut their calories way too low. Add in the extra exercise, and all of a sudden you have an extreme calorie deficit that is working against you.
Not eating enough calories causes many metabolic changes. Your body is a smart machine and senses any large decrease in dietary intake. Your large calorie deficit might work for a few days or even weeks, but eventually your body will wake up and sound alarms that it needs to conserve energy. It doesn’t want to just waste away. It needs energy to survive. So, what does your body do when it senses prolonged energy restriction?

Thyroid Hormone Production Slows
Your thyroid is responsible for fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism among other things. Your body has the ability to slow down thyroid output in an effort to maintain energy balance

Muscle Mass Decreases
Muscles need lots of calories to maintain. After a few days of extreme calorie deficit, it is one of the first things that your body gets rid of. Your body needs your stored fat and the muscle can be spared. It breaks down the muscle tissue and uses it for energy.

Testosterone Levels Fall
An important hormone for both men and women, testosterone is just one of many hormones that are affected with severe calorie restriction .

Testosterone is important to muscle tissue. Without it, it becomes that much harder to maintain, let alone increase muscle mass.

Fatloss Hormones Reduce
Leptin, one of many energy regulating hormones. More importantly, it’s a “hunger” hormone that tells you whether to eat or not. High leptin levels signal that it’s OK to stop eating, while low leptin levels are a signal to eat more.

Energy Levels Decrease
There are many physical actions your body takes when you don’t eat enough calories to lose weight, but there are also some mental ones.
Neurotransmitter production is limited, which can lead to a lack of motivation. It’s your body’s way of telling you to “slow down” – conserve your energy.

The next post will discuss how many calories you should be eating to lose weight/fat.

All Calories Are NOT Equall!

This is THE biggest misconception causing you to struggle with dieting and fat-burning.

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In fact, everyone from your doctor right down to your favourite friend is probably encouraging you to make this costly calorie mistake. Don’t fall for it…

Fantastically explained here by…
(Believe him he’s a busy $350/hour man)

– by Ryan Faehnle

International Fatloss Consultant

CSCS, FMS, PICP, BioSignature & PIMST

S&C Coach, Miami University, 2005 – 2011

Did you know that doctors, personal trainers, nutritionists, nurses and even the government are unintentionally (I hope…) giving you the WORST possible weightloss advice?

In fact, 99.9% of them STILL believe this outdated information is relevant, and they stick to this “common wisdom” despite a huge mountain of evidence that it’s flat out WRONG.

I’m sure you’ve heard it before, in some way, shape or form. It goes something like this…

“Eat less and move more.”

Sounds logical, right?

Calories in vs. calories out.

We’ve all heard that this simple equation is the key to getting a lean, hard body. And that substituting lower-calorie foods for high-calorie options is the key to having the body of your dreams.

100 calorie package of Oreos anyone?

But if this were true…

Why are “calorie-counters” still fat?

As a society, we’ve been calorie conscious for over 4 decades. And we just keep getting fatter.

So do calories even matter? Is there more that you need to know?

The fact is, the concept of calorie counting has many flaws. But one CRITICAL mistake makes it nearly impossible for you to lose bodyfat with this approach.

So what’s the big mistake?

Calorie counting does not take into account the hormonal effect of food.

Most people who try low calorie diets end up eating foods that set off a cascade of “fat-storing hormones.”

For example, let’s compare eating 200 calories from a high-carb energy bar with eating 200 calories from organic butter.

Which of those choices is going to make you fatter?

If you said butter, you’re not alone. 9 times out of 10, the average person will make the same guess. After all, it’s what you’re lead to believe with elaborate food marketing, pseudo-science experts, and celebrity fitness personalities.

Sure, it’s the same 200 calories, but here is what happens hormonally…

When you eat the high-carb energy bar, your body secretes insulin in response to the elevated blood sugar. Insulin is a “building” hormone – in other words it is fat-storing. It takes the sugar in your blood and drives it into fat cells, making them bigger.

The butter, on the other hand, blunts insulin, leading to a more sustained energy release and a feeling of fullness. But that’s not all, the butter actually sends signals to your body to BURN bodyfat.

So… same calories in both, but certainly not the same reaction in your body!

Unfortunately, many of the commonly recommended “low calorie” health foods are exactly the ones that set off that cascade of fat-STORING hormones. So no matter how low you take your calories, you end up becoming a fat-hoarding machine.

So do calories matter?

Yes, in the big scheme of things, calories do matter. BUT, the hormonal effect of the foods you eat is far more important.

To optimize your hormonal response to food, eat plenty of protein & tons of vegetables. Load up on healthy fats like olive oil, coconut oil, and organic full-fat butter. And reserve “starchy” carbohydrate intake to the hour immediately after your hardest weight training workouts, and ONE weekly cheat meal.

Don’t make the mistake of obsessing over the minutiae of calorie-counting without first getting your hormones in check. It will only lead to a mediocre body, endless frustration, a dead metabolism, and guaranteed rebound weight gain.

And by eating the RIGHT kinds of calories, you also prime the ONE type of cell in your body that can give you a fast metabolism and unlock near-effortless fatloss.
……….…….………..……………..…………….…………………………….

Sound familiar- if you train with me or attend my workshops you will have heard some of this before. I use these principles to manipulate your nutrition and hormone stays so th will be much more likely to burn fat – every week, week in week out- no plateaux, no starving, no problem

Next workshop coming September- 3 Phase Eating Plan for Healthy Fat Loss!
Reserve your slot Now – limited to 10 spots

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See Yourself Clearly

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#1 THE IMPOSTER PHENOMENON
You know how it feels to move into a new home or get a new car or upgrade to a new computer? You like it but it still doesn’t feel like yours. Your old model had its flaws but you knew how to use it, you were comfortable with it. A similar situation when you lose weight.

you may have spent so long living in a heavy body that when you do lose weight, you can’t believe that the skinny person in the mirror is actually you.

This critical time period, when your mind tries to catch up to your body, is where many revert to old habits.

Doubt creeps in, along with a feeling of unworthiness. Though it may be hard to believe, for many of you, it’s almost as if you were more comfortable being bigger.

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THE SOLUTION: While your exercise and nutrition may bring about the body transformation you want, the second – and equally important – part of that transition is the emotional and mental work you must do to adjust to your new body.

I believe its essential to take pictures of yourself throughout the process. They’ll remind you how much you’ve done to earn your new, better body.

Take a few minutes most mornings to look at those old pictures, and compare them to what you see in the mirror. This simple exercise of comparing the old you to the new you will reinforce that this is who you are meant to be. you will adjust to your leaner, sleeker shape. You’ll know that you have the body you worked for and deserve. You’re not an imposter.

Smart phones are good for this, take monthly photos in a full length mirror ad you work towards your goal. Review them regularly, you’ll stay on track and recognise your new shape and believe your ability to change.

Don’t ever think it’s vain, or silly, it’s a really important factor in resetting your view and understanding of who and what you are!

You are NOT a fat person that has lost some weight…
You ARE a slim, fit person!!

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Why Diets Can’t Work!

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Why Diets Can’t Work!

There’s been a lot of chat in class this week about a TV program. It was nothing new to me, I’ve been banging on about the Diet Industry for years.
The interesting thing is that now people are seeing that ‘diet’ products are produced by the Food Industry. The very companies that need you to stay FAT! They persuade you to fill your children with sugar for breakfast, sell you packs of salty crackers and fake cheese for lunch and then processed carb’ loaded options for dinner and tea.
Hopefully, we all will open our eyes to the simple truth that we all need food – so lets choose simple, fresh (including fresh- frozen) UN processed, nutrient dense foods.

Diets Do Work?
Despite what statistics might show, people can lose weight. Whether it’s through pure motivation, adrenaline, meat-only diets, or any number of other psychological and physiological tactics, many people can power through a few months and drop some of the pounds they want.

But then what happens?

For many, the pendulum swings back. Motivation dips, adrenaline subsides, and people stop telling you how wonderful you look.

Well guess what: Once you go back to your old habits, weight finds you. And then we end up right back where we started – and sadly you’ll be fatter than before. It’s not your fault it’s a hard wired, inbuilt survival mechanism to prevent starvation and guarantee survival!

Real Problem – we can’t keep it off!

The key to maintaining weight loss isn’t contained in a single diet or exercise plan. It’s more related to the emotional, psychological and lifestyle factors that dictate our relationship—and behaviors—with food.

next time we’ll talk about the three hidden conditions that can sabotage your success.

The longer I council clients about their nutrition, the more I realise there should e no banned foods- just healthier choices.

That means when you choose meat- get a local supplier, that doesn’t feed with anti-Biotics to prevent the illnesses overcrowded production methods cause.

Choose fruits in season – local and organic if you can afford it… See my article on which fruits should ALWAYS be organic (avoid pesticides).

Choose fresh, local veg- or fresh frozen to extend their season and cut down on prep. time.

Of course there are other actor – but choosing quality food will stop your cravings in their tracks. You won’t eat, want and so need to buy as much food.

Clients often tell me they can’t afford to buy Free Range or Local – I ask them to change where they shop – plan menu’s – buy what they really need. Cutting out crisps, treats, biscuits and baked goods will save huge proportion of your food budget. Loose fizzy pop, soda and sweetened juices will do the same.

We’ve all gradually been brainwashed- by the food industry and clever advertising campaigns to believe we NEED these fake food products.

Breakfast cereals – invented by Mr Kellogg

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Fruit drinks – full of sugars and sweeteners

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Biscuits – sugar and fat, not much else

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Sweets (candy) – more sugar

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Fizzy pop – chemicals, sugar and sweeteners

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These foods make their manufacturers Billions, keep us fat and addicted to them. Eating them prevents you getting the nutrients your body craves.
Guess what, we then turn to the ‘slimming’ products and services the very same manufacturers own.

So, why would they EVER want you to succeed?

Don’t feel guilty, don’t feel a failure – get smart.

Next time we’ll look at what goes on in your head once you’ve succeeded, and maybe discover why you slip back again.

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