1/10 Top Reasons to Drop Cardio for HIIT Training

Improved Insulin Sensitivity

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Are you finding you have to eat less and less to maintain or reduce your weight?
That suggests your metabolism needs a boost, and that just won’t happen if you starve yourself…

Read on to discover the first of 10 reasons why you need to include HIIT into your training program…

Insulin sensitivity, or how well your cells respond to insulin, has a big impact on how well you tolerate carbohydrates, and whether those carbohydrates will affect your ability to mobilize fatty acids. Reduced insulin sensitivity means you need more and more insulin to do the same job. And since insulin is a storage hormone, when it’s high, it’s more difficult to lose fat.
Following just 2 weeks of HIIT, in which there was a total of only 15 minutes of exercise, insulin sensitivity was improved by 23%

This means that your body will cope with the food you eat better, you’ll be much less likely to store fat and MUCH more likely to burn it!
So, you won’t have to starve yourself to lose fat and scale weight.

Research study….
The electronic version of the research article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/9/3

Study Detail Outline
Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males
John A Babraj1†, Niels BJ Vollaard1†, Cameron Keast1, Fergus M Guppy1, Greg Cottrell1 and James A Timmons12*

* Corresponding author: James A Timmons jamie.timmons@gmail.com

† Equal contributors
Author Affiliations
1 Translational Biomedicine, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2 The Wenner-Gren Institute, Arrhenius Laboratories, Stockholm University, Sweden

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BMC Endocrine Disorders 2009, 9:3 doi:10.1186/1472-6823-9-3

Received: 10 September 2008
Accepted: 28 January 2009
Published: 28 January 2009
© 2009 Babraj et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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