100% FREE 21 Day Trial

“Are You Ready to TRANSFORM Your Body and Reach Your Peak Health, Fitness & Nutrition Goals In a Supportive Group Environment?”

If the answer is YES, get in touch NOW!

20140926-193037-70237425.jpg

Introducing the 100% FREE 21 DAY TRIAL with Me Where You’ll Discover…

GROUP PERSONAL TRAINING!
Led by me, at my private studio you’ll enjoy small group training that’s both fun and challenging to give you the rock solid results you desire the most!

100% COMMITMENT TO YOU!
I am 100% committed to help you reach your goals through the use of inspired motivation, true accountability, and healthy relationships

20140926-192927-70167907.jpg

HIGH QUALITY WORKOUTS!
I’ll make sure you not only get individual attention during all workouts, but also get the highest quality of workouts complete with proper form and powerful techniques! Personalised warm-ups, pre-hab and homework plus essential rest and recovery sessions.

DIVERSITY & INTENSITY!
In order for you to get the best results, I’ll mix things up to give you a wide range of workouts. This way you’ll avoid the boredom and results plateau you normally get from standard group workout plans.

20140926-193124-70284087.jpg

NUTRITION & LIFESTYLE
I offer leading edge, science based programs to balance your hormones, hunger, cravings and boost your energy levels too! You’ll learn about the nutrition your body needs for health, understand portion control, supplements and much more through my Weekly Simple Nutrition Course.

“Finally achieve the real results you’ve always dreamed of in a fantastic group environment with friendly like-minded people just like you!”

Weekly Schedule : http://www.jaxallenfitness.com/weekly

Eat Clean, Train Smart, Expect Lasting Results!

Jax Allen

Proud London Olympic Torchbearer

Email jaxallenfitness@gmail.com
Text 07831 680086

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 4

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 4

20140919-223037-81037754.jpg

Evolution of the human GI tract
In Paleo circles, it’s sometimes said that while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10,000 years, our genes have changed very little. And further, that we really only thrive in a world with similar conditions to the Paleolithic era.
Quite frankly, this is not how evolution or genetic expression works.
If humans and other organisms could thrive only in circumstances similar to the ones their predecessors lived in, life would not have lasted very long.
Examples of the ways we have evolved in the past 10,000 years abound.
For example, over the past 8,000 years or so, about forty per cent of us have developed the capacity to consume dairy for a lifetime. As a species, we’re evolving a mutation whereby we continue to produce the lactase enzyme to break down lactose for far longer periods than our ancestors ever could. True, not everyone can digest lactose well, but more of us can do so than ever before.
And studies have shown that even people who don’t digest lactose well are capable of consuming moderate amounts of dairy, tolerating an average 12 grams of lactose at a time (the amount of lactose in one cup of milk) with few to no symptoms.

Additionally, the emerging science of epigenetics is showing that a “blueprint” alone isn’t enough — genes can be “switched off” or “on” by a variety of physiological and environmental cues.

Gut knowledge
Our digestive systems have adapted over millennia to process a low-energy, nutrient-poor, and presumably high-fibre diet. Meanwhile, Western diets have become high-energy, low-fibre, and high-fat.
Our genes produce only the enzymes necessary to break down starch, simple sugars, most proteins, and fats. They aren’t well adapted to cope with a steady influx of chicken nuggets, Potato chips, and ice cream.
So how is it that we can still digest our food, albeit imperfectly at times?
Thank the trillions of bacteria that live in our gut. These friendly critters interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibres, releasing bound phytonutrients and anti-oxidants, and helping us to assimilate many important compounds.
Now, we don’t have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be pretty confident that our ancestors’ microbial communities would not exactly match our own.
That’s because bacteria evolve and adapt at a rate much faster than our slow human genes. And for us, that’s a good thing.

It helps to explain why, even if the ancient human diet didn’t include grains, legumes, dairy, and other relatively modern agricultural products, we still might thrive on such a diet today – at least, with a little help from our bacterial friends.

The magical microbiome
Thanks to the Human Microbiome Project and other massive research projects around the world, we now know that trillions of microorganisms from thousands of different species inhabit the human body.
In fact, the total genetic makeup of these little creatures is at least 100 times greater than our own! (Essentially, we’re only 1% human. Think about that.)
This vast genetic diversity ensures that our GI tracts can adapt rapidly to changes in diet and lifestyle.
A single meal can change the type of bacteria that populate your gut. And as little as several days on a new diet can lead to dramatic changes in the bacterial populations in your GI tract.
The diverse, complex, and dynamic nature of our microbiome helps to explain why some of us seem to do well on one type of diet, while others will feel and perform better with another type of diet — even though, genetically, we’re all 99% the same!
Many of us can break down the more “modern” food compounds that Paleo advocates claim we do not tolerate well — simply because our intestines harbour bacteria that have evolved to do that job.

For instance, some Japanese people host unique bacteria that can help them digest seaweed.
And many people can alleviate symptoms of lactose intolerance by eating yogurt or other probiotic-rich foods that provide lactose-digesting bacteria.
So even if you don’t naturally break down lactose well, it’s possible, through the right combination of foods and/or probiotic supplements, to persuade the bacteria in your gut to do this job on your behalf.
What’s more, the same strategy could also address gluten intolerance. Recent research shows that some bacteria actually produce enzymes that break down gluten — as well as phytic acid — reducing any inflammatory or anti-nutrient effects.
Which, as we know, are two of the main reasons people recommend starting Paleo diets in the first place.

Modern Paleo research
No matter how you slice it, the Paleo proponents’ evolutionary arguments just don’t hold up.
But that doesn’t mean that the diet itself is necessarily bad.
Maybe it’s a good diet for completely different reasons than they say.
To find out if that is so, a number of researchers have been putting Paleo diets to the test with controlled clinical trials. And so far, the results are promising, though incomplete.

Paleo vs. Mediterranean diets
Perhaps the best known of these researchers is Dr. Lindeberg — the one who also studied the Kitavan Islanders. He and his colleagues have conducted two clinical trials testing the efficacy of the Paleo diet.
In the first, they recruited diabetic and pre-diabetic volunteers with heart disease and placed them on one of two diets:
A “Paleolithic” diet focused on lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, starchy root vegetables, eggs, and nuts, or
A “Mediterranean” diet focused on whole grains, low-fat dairy, vegetables, fruit, fish, oils, and margarine.

After 12 weeks, the Mediterranean group lost body fat and saw an improvement in markers of diabetes. Four of the nine participants with diabetic blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study had normal levels by the end. That’s a very good result and must have made the participants happy.

But those in the Paleo group fared even better.
They lost 70 percent more body fat than the Mediterranean group and also normalized their blood sugars. In fact, all ten participants with diabetic blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study reached non-diabetic levels by the end of the study.
By any estimation, that is an astonishing result.
Now, these volunteers were suffering from mild, early cases of diabetes. But a second study of long-term diabetics showed that a Paleo diet didn’t cure them but it did improve their condition significantly.

Other research has found:
The Paleo diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean diet.
The Paleo diet improves blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and blood lipids.
However, one caveat: Like most low-carb trials, the macronutrients (especially protein) in these studies weren’t matched.
The Paleo group ate a lot more protein, compared to the other diet groups. Plenty of protein helps keep our lean mass dense and strong, stay lean, and feel satisfied by our meals.
So, we’re not just comparing apples to oranges when protein intakes are different; this is more like comparing grains to goat meat. Literally.

The Paleo diet may indeed be the best plan, but it’s hard to know for sure without direct comparisons that match macronutrients and calories.

Conclusion & recommendations
What does the Paleo diet get right?
A. Despite the faulty evolutionary theory it’s based on, in the end, the Paleo diet likely gets more right than it gets wrong.
B. Paleo-style eating emphasizes whole foods, lean proteins, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and other healthy fats, which is a massive improvement over the average Western diet.
C. Paleo-style eating has been extremely effective for improving several chronic diseases. That alone is a huge plus.
D. Paleo-style eating has made us more aware of how processed and crappy a lot of our 21st century food is.
However, we need more rigorous (and carefully matched) trials before we can reach any definitive conclusions.

What are the challenges?
Despite its obvious benefits over the typical Western diet, the Paleo diet has some flaws.
The evidence for excluding dairy, legumes, and grains isn’t (yet) strong. So as a nutrition coach, I can’t say it’s a one-size-fits-all prescription. Certainly, some people should avoid dairy and gluten, and control legume and grain consumption. But most of us can improve the way we look, feel, and perform without completely eliminating these foods.
The evolutionary arguments don’t hold up. The human body isn’t simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic era. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits (and microorganisms) that have been tweaked, transformed, lost, and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have continued over the past 10,000 years — and won’t stop any time soon.

In the broader sense, strictly following a list of “good” and “bad” or “allowed” and “not allowed” foods tends to be problematic for most people. Generally, this approach leads to anxiety and all-or-nothing thinking. Maybe it makes us feel more confident and (falsely) sure of ourselves in the short term. But it’s less effective over the long-term — because ultimately, it decreases our consistency.
This may explain why we are seeing the Paleo diet itself evolve.
It’s evolution, baby
Many Paleo advocates have recently come to appreciate and encourage the addition of moderate amounts of starch (albeit a more limited variety of options than I would prefer), as well as some dark chocolate, red wine and non-grain spirits (such as tequila), and grass-fed dairy.
These additions make life much more pleasant. They make healthy eating more attractive and achievable.
In fact, this new “leniency” may partly explain why the Paleo diet continues to gain traction in mainstream nutrition circles.
Because in the end, moderation, sanity and your personal preferences are more important than any specific food list, anti-nutrient avoidance, or evolutionary theory.

What to do today
Consider the good things about ancestral lifestyles. This includes fresh food, fresh air, lots of movement, good sleep, and a strong social network.
How could you get just a little bit of these in your life today?
Think about how you could move along the spectrum — from processed 21st century life and food — to choices that are a little more in tune with what your ancient body needs and loves.
Learn a little more about your ancestors. Evolution is cool. Dig into your roots: Where did your people come from? What were their ancestral diets?
Keep it simple and sane. Doing a few good things pretty well (like getting a little extra sleep or fresh veggies) is much better than trying to get a lot of things “perfect”.
Stay critical and informed. Avoid dogmatic or cultish thinking. Be skeptical. Look for evidence. Question everything. Primal eating is a super cool idea and may turn out to be more or less right; just keep your late-evolving prefrontal cortex (aka your thinky brain) in the game as you consider all the options.
Help your old body (and your trillions of little buddies) do their jobs. Our bodies are resilient. We didn’t get to be one of the dominant species on the planet by being fussy, delicate flowers.

Nevertheless, think about how you can nourish your body optimally in order to give your body and microbiome the best chance of surviving and thriving.

Eat Clean, Stay Active. Feel Great
Jax

Yoga – Your Way!

5.Yoga Your Way
Even people who have never tried yoga before, or are apprehensive about whether or not yoga is “for them” have fallen in love with my sessions. My style of yoga is specifically designed for gym-goers, Sports people and Athletes of all kinds and can convert even the most skeptical person into a yoga-loving lifter!

20140914-183914-67154747.jpg

No matter where you are in your yoga practice, these sessions will benefit you exponentially. Whether you’ve never done yoga before, or are an advanced Yogi/Yogini you’ll get a lot of out of these sessions.
Your body will thank you for it!!

20140914-184110-67270093.jpg

It’s time to include yoga into your life!

Stay Bendy

Jax

10 Tips to Avoid Colds & Flu

It’s Cold & Flu season so here are the 10 Worst Things for Your Immune System in hopes that you would do your best to avoid the bugs and stay healthy this winter. 🙂

IMG_0877.JPG
Here we go:

1. Processed foods
An overburdened digestive system steals energy from your immune system, leaving the immune system operating on “less cylinders.” To unburden your digestive system, eat as few processed foods as possible. This will restore power to your immune system.

2. Insufficient sleep
Sleep is a time for the body to recharge. A study from the University of Chicago showed that men who slept 4 hours a night after one week had half the number of serum flu-fighting antibodies as did men who slept 7.5 – 8.5 hours.

3. Pessimism
Though some people seem to be born either pessimistic or optimistic, make efforts to think like an optimist. A UCLA study showed that optimistic law students at the beginning of their first semester had more immune system cells by mid-semester, than did students who were pessimistic.

Though it seems obvious that optimists take better care of themselves, the researchers have not ruled out a physiological basis for this disparity.

4. Locking in emotions
Keeping emotions bottled up can suppress the action of the immune system’s killer T cells. On the other hand, unleashing emotions with a nasty fury has been shown to result in fewer killer T cells.

So while it’s bad to sit and stew, it’s also bad to throw temper tantrums. Find a happy medium…
Use your transformation journal!

5. Losing out to stress
Mismanagement of stress suppresses your immune response, including making killer T cells sluggish, plus lowering their quantity. Though certain stressful situations cannot be avoided, figure out which ones can, then avoid them.

For example, leave for work 10 minutes earlier so that slow-movement in bottleneck traffic isn’t as unnerving.

6. Use Your Own Pen
(Use sanitising gel after chip& pin)
Avoid touching community-handled objects such as pens at the grocery store, bank, doctor’s office, etc. Communal pens are loaded with germs. Have your own pen on you at all times. The handle of a shopping cart is also very germy; rather than push here, pull it at the other end; fewer hands have been there. Yes, you will get a few funny looks! When it’s colder wear trendy gloves!

7. Insufficient exercise Doh!
You know I had to mention it. ;-b
Rigorous bouts of exercise toughen up the immune system. If you’re a local reader who wants to try us out, contact me for a 7 day FREE trial. If you’re not in the CHELTENHAM area, follow my blogs http://www.jaxallenfitness.com
http://www.superseniorssolutionsuk.com
And friend me on Facebook – Jax Allen and you can join or follow the groups that interest you.

IMG_0941.JPG

While we’re talking exercise consider using washable training gloves and yoga socks or your own exercise mat! Just watch the cleaning regime in your gym – handles, seats, mats should be sprayed and wiped down or better still steam cleaned – but I know it doesn’t happen!
Ps I have a cleaning contract for my studio exercise mats. Plus anti bacterial spray for kit. Even a supply of washable gloves !

8. Exposure to secondhand smoke
Forbid people to light up in your car or house. Avoid being near smokers outside. Secondhand smoke is truly a health hazard and can cripple your immune system, killing around 3,000 nonsmokers a year with lung cancer, and resulting in 300,000 childhood cases a year of lower respiratory-tract infections.

9. Misuse of antibiotics
Some people who take antibiotics have diminished levels of cytokines, which are important components of your immune system. When you are prescribed antibiotics, use them immediately and finish the entire prescription. Don’t ask for antibiotics, if you need them ur GP will suggest them and then complete the course. Also, while you should always take a probiotic, you may want to double up when you’re taking antibiotics.

10. Being a gateway to pathogens
Many people get sick simply because they put a finger to their eye, nose, mouth or ear–portals through which microscopic villains enter the body. Resolve not to touch these portals while in public. Pick your nose at home. LOL!

If an eye or your nose itches, then place a tissue or napkin between your finger and skin to scratch the area. Be aware of how often your fingers are at your mouth as you read something in public like a restaurant menu (another very germy communal object).

Although it will be challenging to make these adjustments, keep at it, and over time, they’ll become second nature.

Stay Healthy!
Train Hard
Eat Clean
Feel Great!!

Jax x

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 3

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 3

20140919-221249-79969055.jpg

Diseases of Wealth and industrialisation

Although furring in arteries may be common, “diseases of wealth” like obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases have certainly gone up dramatically in the past 50 years in industrialised countries, especially compared to non-developed populations.
Over the last century — a period that is far too short for notable genetic adaptation — we have radically changed the way we eat and live in the UK.
Today, the average Brit subsists on foods that are packaged and commercially prepared. Rich in refined sugars and starches, highly processed fats, and salt, these foods are designed to be so delicious that the body’s normal fullness signals don’t work and encourage overeating.

Consider: The top calorie sources in the western diet today are
1. grain-based desserts (cake, cookies, etc.)
2. yeast breads
3. chicken-based dishes (and you know that doesn’t mean roast chicken)
4. sweetened beverages
5. pizza
6. alcoholic drinks

These are not ancestral foods. Nor foods that any nutrition expert, regardless of dietary persuasion, would ever recommend.

So when proponents of the Paleo diet claim that our modern Western diet isn’t healthy for us, they are absolutely correct.

But is the Paleo diet really Paleo?
Remember: There’s no single “Paleo diet”.
Our ancestors lived pretty much all over the world, in incredibly diverse environments, eating incredibly diverse diets.

Still, in most cases, primal diets certainly included more vegetables and fruits than most people eat today. So if we want to be healthier, we should do what our ancestors did and eat a lot of those. Correct?

Maybe so… but not necessarily for the reasons that Paleo proponents recommend.

First of all, most modern fruits and vegetables are not like the ones our ancestors ate.
Early fruits and vegetables were often bitter, much smaller, tougher to harvest, and sometimes even toxic.
Over time, we’ve bred plants with the most desirable traits — the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh, and fewest natural toxins.

We’ve also diversified plant types — creating new cultivars from common origins (such as hundreds of cultivars of potatoes or tomatoes from a few ancestral varieties).

Likewise, most modern animal foods aren’t the same either.
Beef steak (even if grass-fed) is not the same as bison steak or deer meat. And so on.

This doesn’t make modern produce or modern meat inherently good or bad. It’s just different from nearly anything available in Paleolithic times.
So the claim that we should eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and meats because we are evolved to eat precisely those foods is a little bit suspect. The ones we eat today didn’t even exist in Paleolithic times!

Grains and grasses
Proponents of the Paleo diet argue that our ancestors’ diets could not have included a lot of grains, legumes, or dairy foods. And they contend that the past 10,000 years of agriculture isn’t enough time to adapt to these “new” foods.
This argument is compelling but doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.
To begin with, recent studies in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, using more advanced analytical methods, have discovered that ancient humans may have begun eating grasses and cereals before the Paleolithic era even began — up to three or even four million years ago!
Further research has revealed granules of grains and cereal grasses on stone stools starting at least 105,000 years ago.
Meanwhile, grain granules on grinding tools from all over the world suggest that Paleolithic humans made a widespread practice of turning grains into flour as long as 30,000 years ago.

In other words, the idea that Paleolithic humans never ate grains and cereals appears to be a bit of an exaggeration.

Are beans really bad for you?
Grains are not the only plant type that the Paleo diet typically limits. Advocates also recommend that you avoid legumes (beans, peanuts, peas, lentils) — and for a similar reason.

However, the idea that legumes were not widely available or widely consumed in Paleolithic times — like the argument that humans didn’t eat grains in the Paleolithic era — is false.
In fact, a 2009 review revealed that not only did our Paleolithic ancestors eat legumes, these were actually an important part of their diet! (Even our primate cousins, including chimpanzees, got into the bean-eating act.)
Legumes have been found at Paleolithic sites all over the world, and in some cases were determined to be the dominant type of plant food available. In fact, the evidence for wild legume consumption by Paleolithic humans is as strong as it is for any plant food.

What about anti-nutrients?
Okay. Maybe our ancient ancestors did eat a little bit of grain and some legumes — so the argument from history doesn’t really hold.
But Paleo proponents also offer another reason to avoid these foods: Their high concentration of anti-nutrients, which supposedly reduces their nutritional value to zilch.
There’s just one problem with this argument. It’s wrong.
Indeed, research suggests that the benefits of legumes far outweigh their anti-nutrient content, especially in light of the fact that cooking eliminates most anti-nutrient effects.
Lectins and protease inhibitors, in particular, are greatly reduced with cooking. And once cooked, these chemicals may actually be good for us. Lectins may reduce tumor growth, while protease inhibitors become anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic.

Phytic acid
But what about phytate?
Grains, nuts, and legumes are rich sources of this anti-nutrient, which can bind to minerals such as zinc and iron and prevent their absorption. Surely that, in itself, is enough reason to avoid grains and legumes?
Not necessarily.
While phytic acid can be toxic if we eat too much of it, in more reasonable amounts it actually offers benefits.
For example, it can:
have antioxidant activity
protect DNA from damage
be prebiotic (i.e. bacteria food)
have anti-cancer properties
reduce bioavailability of heavy metals like cadmium and lead.
And, in a mixed diet composed of other nutrient-dense whole foods, phytic acid is unlikely to cause problems.

In fact, nearly all foods contain anti-nutrients as well as nutrients — particularly plant foods.
For example, incredibly healthy foods such as spinach, Swiss chard, many berries, and dark chocolate are also sources of oxalate, an anti-nutrient that inhibits calcium absorption.
Green tea and red wine contain tannins, another anti-nutrient that inhibits zinc and iron absorption.
And so on.

Overall, phytic acid and other so-called anti-nutrients probably have a “sweet spot” (just like most nutrients).
Eating none or a small amount might be inconsequential.
Eating a moderate amount might be good.
Eating too much will hurt you.

Grains and inflammation
Another argument for a Paleo diet is that eating grains can lead to inflammation and related health problems.
While this can be true for people with celiac disease (about 1% of the population) and for those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (estimated to be about 10% of the population, if it even truly exists), on the whole, the research does not support this argument any more than it supports the argument about anti-nutrients.

In fact, observational research has suggested that:
whole grains may decrease inflammation, but
refined grains may increase inflammation.
In other words, it appears that processing may cause problems, not the grain itself.
Meanwhile, controlled trials consistently show that eating grains, whether whole or refined, does not affect inflammation at all!

What can we make of that?
At worst, whole grains appear to be neutral when it comes to inflammation.
And overall, a substantial body of evidence from both observational and controlled trial research suggests that eating whole grains and legumes improves our health, including:
improved blood lipids;
better blood glucose control;
less inflammation; and
lower risk of stroke and coronary heart disease.

Eliminating these important foods completely from our diet to conform to anybody’s dietary ideology is probably a poor idea.

Moderation, variety, quality and as little processing as possible are the most important factors.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great

Jax

Lose Fat with Yoga!

4. Yoga Fatloss
Most people naturally assume they should be doing cardio on their off days to encourage fat loss, which is actually not the most effective choice. In fact, the absolute best option is something you might not expect: YOGA.

20140914-182606-66366926.jpg

Yes, yoga! I know, you’ve probably never considered yoga as a fat-burning tool. You might think that yoga is lame or isn’t really effective for building lean muscle or losing fat—but I want you to think again.

20140914-182707-66427554.jpg

Yoga isn’t just stretching, and it isn’t always slow. It can be challenging and fast paced, and can even help burn a ton of calories. You’ll challenge your body in far different ways than you would at the gym, and it’s that kind of diversity of movement that will really help take your fat loss attempts to the next level.

20140914-182829-66509579.jpg

Yoga is, without a doubt, the perfect way to add low-impact, high-yield exercise into your routine on days when you aren’t hitting the gym. It’ll help you to recover from intense, metabolic resistance workouts, and won’t steal from the energy necessary to crush it at the gym

Stay Bendy

Jax

20140914-183221-66741343.jpg

5 Reasons Girls Should Weight Train!

Why should you add resistance training to your routine?

20140914-180409-65049210.jpg</a

If you've read my posts before, you'll know that I'm a firm believer in strength training for everyone – not just for body builders but for anyone that's interested in developing or maintaining a healthy body composition.

We had a great session in my studio a few days ago, I had my breakfast group dead lifting and squatting relatively (for them) heavy weights.

Now, before I hear your calls of 'lifting heavy weights makes women bulky', I'd like to remind you that female body builders have to train for hours most days to make significant muscle gains and obsess about their diets, eating huge amounts of calories to keep their increased muscle.

Other comments I've heard in the past have been 'it's dangerous, it's bad for your joints, and once you have muscle, you can't stop lifting or it will all turn to fat'

Let's get a few things straight. It's all rubbish and it helps fuel the myths that keep too many women from experiencing the profound benefits of strength training.

20140914-180228-64948204.jpg

So, girls when you sit down to list your fitness objectives, you may be surprised to learn that strength training will not only help you reach them, but may help you reach them faster than performing cardio exercise alone.

Yoga and the treadmill have their place, but they’re not enough on their own. Here are five reasons you should prioritise strength training in your fitness regime.

1- MORE EFFECTIVE FAT LOSS: Think weightlifting only benefits those who want shirt-ripping arms? Think again.

Although many people consider weightlifting only a means to add size, when contrasted head-to-head against cardiovascular exercise, resistance/strength training comes out on top in the battle to burn calories.

The huge advantage to weight training is your body’s ability to burn fat during and most importantly, after exercise.
Studies show that compared to cardio you’ll burn NINE times more fat after weight training and continue burning fat for at least 36hrs after training!

20140914-175845-64725864.jpg

2- MORE MUSCLE, MORE CALORIE EXPENDITURE: As you increase strength and lean muscle mass, your body uses calories more efficiently. Daily muscle contractions from a simple wink to a heavy squat contribute to how many calories you burn in a given day. Sitting burns fewer calories than standing; standing burns fewer than walking and walking burns fewer than squatting and lunging with added resistance.

The more muscle contractions you experience during a day, the more calories you’ll burn. If you have more lean muscle mass, you’ll have more muscle contractions and thus burn more calories.

20140914-175751-64671917.jpg

3- CURVES – AS YOU INCREASE STRENGTH AND LEAN MUSCLE MASS, YOUR BODY USES CALORIES MORE EFFICIENTLY: As you build muscle, your body begins to take a nice hourglass shape. Though endurance exercise can help you lose weight, that weight comes in the form of both fat and muscle tissue.

If you’re losing both fat and muscle, you can lose those lovely, and they are lovely, curves as well. Strength training can help create and sustain them.

4- STRESS RELIEF: Exercise in general is a great way to manage stress. Researchers have consistently found that those who regularly strength train tend to manage stress better and experience fewer adverse reactions to stressful situations as those who do not.

In addition, resistance-training studies on older adults show that moderate intensity weightlifting improves memory and cognitive function. Next time you need to blow off some steam, hit the weights.

5- QUALITY SLEEP: Strength training greatly improves sleep quality, aiding in your ability to fall asleep faster, sleep deeper, and wake less often during the night.

A study published in the International SportMed Journal suggests that morning resistance training or high intensity training greatly affects the quality of sleep and lengthens the time of sleep the night after training.

Here comes the science. If fat loss is your goal, a primary purpose of these training programs is to produce a large metabolic hormone response, notably growth hormone (GH). At night during deep slow wave sleep is your biggest opportunity for GH production.

If you’re not sleeping soundly, you won’t get the GH release and In addition, stress hormones such as cortisol will be elevated. The HPA axis that governs hormone levels will get agitated, adaptations will be compromised, and fat loss will stall.

THE BOTTOM LINE IS, GET LIFTING GIRLS.
I’m sure you all want to feel strong, determined, and confident in everything you do from fitting into jeans, to moving heavy furniture, to playing with kids, to dealing with a stressful career.

Resistance training can benefit you in all aspects of your life and make you feel stronger, healthier, and more confident. It’s a key component that guarantees results from our rest based, breakfast and evening training sessions.

If you’re local get in touch for a FREE Trial!
Otherwise, find a local gym, personal trainer or weight training group, you’ll see results fast!

Eat Clean. Train Hard. Feel Great
Jax

>