Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix Liquid

my choice from The Nutrition Centre Cheltenham

Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix Liquid  
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix is an intense electrolyte liquid, sourced from the Great Salt Lake, Utah in the USA.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix contains Electrolytes, which are mineral salts dissolved in the body’s blood and fluid, they carry an electric charge and therefore can affect the blood’s pH and muscle function.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix’s mineral salts includes: Sodium, chloride, magnesium and potassium. These are involved in balancing the fluid throughout the body including the volume of fluid within the blood.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix benefits:

  
 Water movement is controlled by the concentration of electrolytes on either side of the cell membrane. Exercise increases fluid loss through sweat. If this fluid is not replaced then dehydration will occur. Dehydration impairs performance as blood volume

decreases and body temperature increases; extra strain will be put on the heart and lungs. The loss of fluid will also lead to an electrolyte imbalance as sodium and potassium are lost through the skin. This imbalance can cause a disruption to the cell’s ability to carry electrical charges and hence reduce athletic performance.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix contains all the necessary electrolytes in an ionic form as well as all other minerals naturally present in sea water. Ionic refers to the mineral being ionically charged (attached to a negatively charged mineral complex).It is important that the electrolytes are present in an ionic form as this is necessary for effective hydration.
In a study looking into the importance of electrolytes for rehydration, eight participants consumed plain water, and eight participants consumed water plus an electrolyte additive. The addition of an electrolyte mixture to plain water decreased the overall fluid levels required for optimal hydration compared to the plain water group. Supplementing water with electrolytes can therefore minimize carrying excessive weight, possibly reducing fatigue during extended exercise.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix is comprised of a blend of naturally occurring brine from the Great Salt Lake containing sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium as well as vast array of other trace and ultra trace elements.

Eat Yourself Fitter!

How to Eat Yourself Fitter 
Okay, so today’s tip is all about protecting your immune system so you can perform at your best all year round. 
The key is, quite simply, what you eat… especially AFTER you’re been doing exercise. 
Truth is, you can follow all the fancy training programmes you want, but if you’re laid up with coughs and colds each winter, you’re never going to reap the rewards of all that hard work. 
So you need to ensure your body gets enough of those nutrients that support your immune system, including: 
• Vitamin A – well supplied in liver, eggs, all orange and red fruits and vegetables such as carrots, sweet potatoes, apricots. 
• Vitamin C – found in citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruits, kiwis, all the berries, also well supplied in tomatoes and peppers. 
• Vitamin D – good sources include eggs, milk, butter, cod liver oil and some other fish oils. 
• Essential fatty acids (i.e. omega-3 and omega-6 oils) – good sources include all the fatty fish (trout, sardines, herrings, salmon, mackerel, pilchards, etc.) as well as unrefined whole grains and nuts and seeds, especially, hemp, flax, walnuts and pumpkin seeds. 
• Zinc – a vital immune nutrient; good sources are high quality, lean cuts of meat and fish and shellfish; also found in whole grains and some nuts and seeds, such as walnuts and pumpkin seeds. 
• Selenium – well supplied in unrefined whole grains (eg wholemeal bread), all seafood and some nuts and seeds, especially Brazil nuts. 
But as well as the above, you need to consider a post-exercise nutritional strategy. 
That info comes next! …..

Eat Well. Train Hard. Expect Results! 

Jax 

Foods To Avoid #2

#2 – Fruit Juice  
The fruit juice we buy in stores sometimes may not be entirely or completely made from fruit juice. UNFORTUNATELY… IT CAN GET A LOT WORSE when we consider just what the fruit juices we buy may contain. It may be a mix of substances that taste like fruit but not actually fruit.
  

CAN YOU BELIEVE THIS? IT’S HAPPENING and many people are falling victim to this marketing phenomenon. It can seem convenient to simply walk into a grocery store and buy a container of fruit juice. However, WHAT ARE WE ACTUALLY BUYING? Are we simply buying into the potential lie that the fruit juice we buy is good for us?

  
Pure fruit juice is the healthier option and with this option, there is still the need to watch consumption levels because natural fruit juice can still contain significant levels of sugar. Such sugar content can have an impact on diseases like diabetes as research shows [2]. Research studies also reveal that sugar can also have an impact in affecting other medical conditions including cardiometabolic risk factors [3].
By focusing on the juice of the fruit alone, we also eliminate the fiber and other benefits we get from eating the whole fruit and not only extracting the juice.
I suggest while trying to reduce body fat – eliminate fruit juice from your nutrition plan. 
When re-introducing juice make sure it’s natural and complete then add the same volume of water to reduce sugar content by half. 
Enjoy
Jax 

Healthy Dips

By Cara Rosenbloom, RD
Posted: September 2013

A tasty dip is great way to make the veggies go down. Here’s how to choose dips that add nutrition – not just fat and salt.
Cara Rosenbloom, RD

A tasty dip can make the veggies go down. But it’s important to choose one that adds healthy nutrition, not just fat and salt.
The research is in: Kids really will eat more vegetables if they are paired with dip.
In one study, researchers gave plain vegetables, as well as veggies with different dips, to preschool children. The children were three times more likely to reject the vegetable alone, compared with the vegetable-dip combo. In a different study, children who were sensitive to the bitter taste of vegetables ate 80 per cent more broccoli when it was paired with a dip or dressing. I haven’t found a similar study on adult palates, but the concept is certainly worth a try!
However, some dips are high in fat and salt, and add little nutritional value to meals and snacks. There are better options!
Healthiest store-bought choices
Whether you are buying a container of dip or a bottled dressing, it’s important to read the ingredient list and the Nutrition Facts panel to look for options that are low in saturated fat, sodium and sugar, but high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.
For example, hummus is a source of fibre from chickpeas; nut-based dips such as peanut butter (yes it tastes great with celery or green pepper) contain heart-healthy magnesium; and dips made from yogurt contain calcium and protein.
On the other hand, ranch dip or dressing offers only fat and sodium, while mustard contains sodium and nothing else.
Pick a dip that lists one of these healthy options as the first ingredient:
Chick peas

White, black or pinto beans

Yogurt or Greek yogurt

Fresh produce: tomato, avocado, spinach, roasted red peppers, pumpkin, etc.

Cottage or light ricotta cheese

Edamame, tofu or soynuts

Nuts or seeds (such as almond or sunflower seed butter)

If the first ingredient is sour cream, cream cheese or mayonnaise, keep shopping. These dips will be high in fat, but lower in protein and other valuable nutrients. If your recipe calls for these ingredients, try using low-fat Greek yogurt instead. It’s thick, creamy and plain-tasting, so it marries nicely with dip-friendly flavours such as dill, garlic, chili flakes, pepper and cumin.
Some dips are high in sodium, so a little goes a long way. If you are a big dipper, choose options with less sodium. Here’s how some popular dips compare in terms of sodium content.
Dip (2 tbsp)

Sodium (mg)

Processed cheese sauce

541

Yellow mustard

330

Low-fat ranch dressing

290

Ketchup

280

Cream cheese onion dip

260

Original ranch dressing

260

Spinach dip

190

Salsa

190

Hummus

130

Nut/seed butter (salt added)

120

Guacamole

85

Yogurt tzatziki

55

Nut/seed butter (no salt added)

0

You can see that the whole food-based dips near the bottom have the least amount of sodium. They also have more protein, vitamins, minerals and healthy fat! It’s win-win.
Make your own
I like to experiment with my own dip recipes, as does Heart and Stroke Foundation recipe developer Emily Richards. Try her delicious Navy bean hummus and Greek yogurt ranch dip.
My kids love dipping carrots and peppers into pureed chickpeas with cumin and lemon juice (it’s like hummus without the garlic), or almond butter blended with Greek yogurt and a touch of cinnamon. I love watching them eat their vegetables – and knowing the dip is giving them a little extra nutrition in every bite. 

This article comes from the heart and stroke foundation Canada. A great resource. 

Jax 

Foods To Avoid #1

#1 – Commercially Processed Salad Dressing

  What are salads? Typically, we would describe salads as a healthy meal, comprising mainly of vegetables and sometimes fruits, nuts and other accompaniments that provide nutrition or some appeal. YES! Salads can be good for us. However, when considering foods we MUST NOT eat, consider the commercially processed salad dressings that are being sold to accompany the salads we eat. These types of dressings can contain TONS AND TONS of unwanted calories.

  
Commercially Processed Salad Dressing

  
The loophole we face with salads is that these foods are usually not served alone. The dressing seems and most times IS the perfect thing to associate with a salad. Without a salad dressing, the salad can taste bland and uninviting. To satisfy to this market need, commercially produced salad dressings can contain ingredients to make this salad dressing product taste appealing. Hence, we NEED to be aware of this food.

New Swim Technique

this saves energy

Keeps you safer in open water swims

Makes you feel powerful like a Dolphin

Works your core and protects your delicate shoulder complex
   
    
    
    
 
I’m upload from LIW UK so I will add mor words later !

Growing Portions Cause Obesity!

Retailers could be forced to charge more for bigger servings to counter damage being done, say Cambridge University experts





Larger sizes are threatening people’s health by encouraging them to overeat, according to experts from Cambridge University, including the government’s chief advisor on obesity.

In a warning about the dangers of overserving, the authors calculated that ridding bigger portions from our diet would make consumers reduce their energy intake from food by 16%, and thereby help fight against obesity.

The damage caused by overserving is so great that the government may have to limit how big servings can be or force retailers to charge much more for them in an attempt to reduce consumption, the authors said. 

Ian Shemilt, who led the research, said: “At the moment it is all too easy – and often better value for money – for us to eat and drink too much. The evidence is compelling now that actions which reduce the size, availability and appeal of large servings can make a difference to the amounts people eat and drink.”

Shemilt pointed to evidence collated by the British Heart Foundation in 2013 showing that curry ready meals had expanded by 50% in the previous 20 years, as had the number of crisps in a family bag. 

An individual shepherd’s pie ready meal grew by 98%, chicken pies were 40% bigger and a meat lasagne ready meal for one had increased by 39%. 

Food campaigners said the study, published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, showed the food industry had to do more to reduce the overconsumption of calories by limiting the size of its products. 

Malcom Clark, the co-ordinator of the Children’s Food Campaign, said: “Bigger plates, bigger packs, bigger portions, bigger us. It’s nudge theory, encouraging us – like so many other prevalent marketing tactics used by the food industry – to consume far more sugar, fat and calories than we ought to, and making it much easier to do so. 

“Initiatives such as limiting chocolate bar single-serve portion size to 250 calories are a start. To counter the huge rise of sharing sizes and snacking bags, especially those aimed at children and family consumption, the government needs to take a hard look in its childhood obesity strategy at how less healthy items are marketed and at what price.”

Downing Street policy officials are drawing up the new strategy, which David Cameron is expected to launch in November. There has been sustained criticismthat the Responsibility Deal approach adopted in 2010, involving voluntary agreements with the food industry, is not countering rising childhood obesity

The authors arrived at their conclusions after examining the results of 61 previous studies, involving 6,711 participants, looking at the influence of the size of portion, packaging and tableware on how much food people eat. They include Prof Susan Jebb, who advises ministers on food and nutrition policy. 

If British consumers could avoid outsized portions, they would cut the amount of energy they get every day from food by 12%-16%, or up to 279 calories, the authors said. If American adults did the same, they could reduce their intake by 22%-29%, or a maximum of 527 calories each daily. 

Prof Brian Ratcliffe, an emeritus professor of nutrition at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, said: “This review provides evidence to support what might seem to be a self-evident truth, that serving larger portions leads to greater levels of consumption, and the effect seems to be more pronounced in adults than children.

“Presumably related to a lack of effective self-restraint, people seem to be reluctant to leave or waste food and so consume what they are served or find larger portions more attractive.” 

More restaurants and fast-food premises should follow the lead set by the few that already offer more than one portion size, he added. 

The Food and Drink Federation, which represents manufacturers, said in a statement that “this research once again confirms the complexity of tackling obesity and that multiple solutions are required, from considering the food we eat to the size of spoons we use to serve food.”

It said firms were providing clear nutritional information on the side of their products, including about portion sizes, and offering a range of portion sizes. 

Dr Alison Tedstone, the chief nutritionist at Public Health England, said: “This study clearly demonstrates that reducing portion sizes is a successful way to cut calories. Given that almost two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, it’s important to keep an eye on portion sizes when cooking, shopping and eating out to avoid overeating and help maintain a healthy weight.”