Still throwing your egg yolks away – wake -up! 

Once upon a time, the egg yolk was the premiere boogeyman of the nutritional world. No more! Here’s what you need to know about using yolks to get yoked.People around the world prepare eggs in countless ways. Scrambled and fried are just the start. But nothing cooked them more than the barrage of attacks laid out by the health industry throughout the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. And the most villainized part of the egg, of course, was the yolk.
But after years of abuse, the future is looking sunny-side up for that little yellow orb. Recent research has shed further light on the health benefits of whole eggs and cast plenty of doubt on the biggest arguments against the yolk. Let’s crack open the discussion!
SCIENCE’S 180 ON SATURATED FAT

For years, the media and health-governing bodies issued warnings to avoid saturated fat at all costs because it was thought to be a major player in increasing one’s risk for cardiovascular disease. Eggs, which happen to contain saturated fat in the yolk, were a primary target. “Only eat eggs twice per week” and “never have more than two eggs a day” were common guidelines.
So what changed? For starters, we know more about saturated fat than we once did. There are various types of saturated fats, in fact, not all of which impact cardiovascular disease risk in the same way.1,2 Some forms, such as stearic acid, haven’t been shown to negatively impact cholesterol levels, and are largely converted to monounsaturated fat in the liver.1 It just so happens that stearic acid makes up a significant portion of an egg yolk’s total saturated fat content, and is present in even higher levels in free-range chicken eggs.3

DON’T SKIP THE YOLKS OUT OF FEAR OF WHAT THEY MIGHT DO TO YOUR HEALTH DECADES DOWN THE ROAD.

In either case, one large egg contains less than 10 percent of the recommended daily amount of saturated fat, and the last time I checked, that’s not even close to the biggest source around.4 But let’s look more closely at saturated fat in general. The reason saturated fat got such a bad rap was because of its supposed effect on cholesterol. Chronically elevated cholesterol, in combination with other cardiovascular disease risks, such as a sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, poor dietary choices, and high blood pressure, has been linked to various forms of heart disease.
Eggs contain plenty of dietary cholesterol—that much is clear. But is that enough to raise cholesterol levels? Some studies indicate that it is, to a certain degree. However, this is no longer thought to be a problem for healthy, active, nonobese, nondiabetic populations. Some research even suggests that genetics is a bigger determinant in cholesterol levels compared to dietary intake.5
In fact, cholesterol is important—in the right amounts—for the avid gym-goer looking to improve his or her performance and physique. Why? Cholesterol is a precursor for testosterone, which, as we all know, has a profound impact on supporting and facilitating gains.

IN ADDITION TO BEING A PROTEIN POWERHOUSE, EGGS ARE JAM-PACKED WITH A RANGE OF CRUCIAL NUTRIENTS. HOWEVER, BY THROWING OUT THE YOLK, YOU’RE LOSING OUT ON NUMEROUS VALUABLE NUTRIENTS.

The real question, of course, is how all the saturated fats in foods like yolks potentially contribute to disease, right? A 2015 systematic review published in the British Medical Journal looked squarely at this association, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes.2 Researchers concluded that “saturated fats are not associated with all-cause mortality, CVD, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, or type 2 diabetes.” Dozens of other studies have backed this up.
The takeaway: Don’t skip the yolks out of fear of what they might do to your health decades down the road.
ALL ABOUT EGGS

As long as the fitness industry has been around, eggs have been considered a go-to protein source. In the 1960s and 1970s, larger-than-life characters like Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky Balboa went the extra mile and guzzled them raw.
Fear of foodborne illness eventually knocked out that practice, but in terms of protein quality and amino-acid availability, eggs remain the gold standard to which other food-based protein sources are compared.6
In addition to being a protein powerhouse, eggs are jam-packed with a range of crucial nutrients. However, by throwing out the yolk, you’re losing out on numerous valuable nutrients. Let’s take a look at the differences between the egg white and the yolk.

EGG WHITE

It’s basically water, protein, and a couple of nutrients in small amounts.
EGG YOLK

It’s got triple the calories of the white, almost as much protein, and a wide range of nutrients including:
Choline: Choline is an essential vitamin-like nutrient that plays a number of important roles within the body, including the production of the crucial neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Choline is also a major player in lipid metabolism and helps to increase neurotransmitter production.7 It just so happens that eggs are one of the best sources of choline.

Vitamin D: This fat-soluble vitamin offers far too many health-supporting and muscle-building benefits to list here. Unfortunately, it’s hard to find in food sources without enrichment.8 For this reason—and because we don’t get enough time in the sun—deficiencies are rampant, which can have serious health implications, particularly on the immune system. Egg yolks won’t solve the problem on their own, but they’re an important part of a multifaceted approach.

Additional fat-soluble vitamins: Egg yolks are also a solid source of vitamins A, E, and K, all of which require adequate dietary fat for absorption. You’ve no doubt heard that taking your daily multivitamin with a meal is a great way to optimize absorption. Yolks are like a multivitamin all on their own—or a great way to make sure yours is working.

If building muscle is your goal, including the yolks is a no-brainer. Whole eggs are rich in leucine, have a rock-solid amino-acid profile, and are about as affordable a superfood as you could ever hope to find. As for those extra calories, well, you’ll need them if you want to add muscle.


YOLKS AND WEIGHT LOSS

Whether whole eggs can help you lose weight is a question I’ve heard many times. The answer isn’t a simple “yes” or “no.” To be clear, the deciding factor in your weight-loss journey is whether or not you’re eating a variety of nutritious foods while in a caloric deficit.
There is a case for whole eggs, though. Consuming more fat has been shown to help keep dieters feeling full longer than a diet low in fat, while also optimizing their hormonal profile. Going very low-fat, we now know, is a bad idea for multiple reasons, and can leave you feeling awful.

DON’T CUT YOLKS OUT ON ACCOUNT OF THEIR FAT. AS FOR THEIR EXTRA CALORIES, WELL, IF YOU’RE SKEPTICAL, YOU CAN ALWAYS OPT FOR A HALF-HALF MIXTURE OF WHITES AND WHOLE EGGS.

So don’t cut yolks out on account of their fat. As for their extra calories, well, if you’re skeptical, you can always opt for a half-half mixture of whites and whole eggs.
But here’s what will always be in favor of eggs: They’re just easy. Making a fast, egg-based breakfast in the morning is simple, satisfying, and can be matched to just about any palate.
My advice? Don’t be chicken about eggs, so long as they fit your macros. The biggest choice now is how you want ’em made.

Eat Fat to Lose Fat!

REFERENCES

Kris-Etherton, P.M. & Innis, S. (2007). Dietary Fatty Acids—Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada. American Dietetic Association Position Report. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(9), 1599-1611.

de Souze, R.J., Mente, A., Maroleanu, A., Cozma, A.I., Ha, V., Kishibe, T., Uleryk, E., Budylowski, P., Schunemann, H., Beyene, J. & Anand, S.S. (2015). Intake of saturated and trans unsaturated fatty acids and risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. The British Journal of Medicine, 351. doi: 10.1136/bmj.h3978.

Samman, S., Kung, F. P., Carter, L. M., Foster, M. J., Ahmad, Z. I., Phuyal, J. L., & Petocz, P. (2009). Fatty acid composition of certified organic, conventional and omega-3 eggs. Food Chemistry, 116(4), 911-914.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs2010-PolicyDocument.htm. Accessed Sept. 12, 2013.

McCaffery, J. M., Pogue-Geile, M. F., Muldoon, M., Debski, T. T., Wing, R. R., & Manuck, S. B. (2001). The nature of the association between diet and serum lipids in the community: A twin study. Health Psychology, 20(5), 341.

Egg Nutrition Council. (2014). Position Statement for Healthcare Professionals: Eggs and Protein. http://enc.org.au/position-statements/eggs-and-protein/.

Zeisel, S.H. & Corbin, K.D. (2012). Choline. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. John Wiley and Sons. 10th Edition, 405-418.

Hamilton, B. (2011). Vitamin D and Athletic Performance: The Potential Role of Muscle. Asian Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(4), 211-219.

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Half the UK Too Tired to Train!

Half of the UK feel too tired to train

Half of the UK feel too tired to train

 

 

Half of the UK feel too tired to train

By TRAINFITNESS Support

 

 

What’s your exercise excuse? We surveyed 2,000 UK adults who work out at least once per week, to reveal the top reasons for avoiding the gym and giving in to tempting treats.

Almost three quarters of the UK don’t have gym membership, but why?

17% of people claim they feel intimidated by other gym users and two thirds deem the gym to be too expensive.

67% of people in Aberdeen are adamant that their excuse for avoiding the gym is the cost of it, despite the rise of no-frills, low-cost membership options at budget gyms.

Figures reveal that women have the most concerns in regards to joining a gym: almost a quarter said they would feel self-conscious compared to just 14% of men. Furthermore, over a fifth of females also revealed that they find the gym intimidating, whereas just 12% of men admitted to this.

The problems start to show up when we assess Crossfit’s training methodology. One of the most important principles we learn as trainers is the SAID (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand) principle. The high level of variability in Crossfit’s programming means there is potentially very little specificity other than the workout itself. 

25-34 year olds are the most likely to feel awkward or uneasy going to the gym, whereas more people aged 65 and over said they would feel confident.

Undeterred by their concerns, more women own gym membership than men. Their biggest motivation is to improve appearance, yet 37% would be willing to shun their gym sessions for social commitments.

Do we give in too easily? Almost half of respondents revealed that their top excuse for swerving a workout was because they felt too tired to train, and the majority would be willing to quit to make time for work commitments.

Being in a relationship wouldn’t stop the workouts though. Under 10% of respondents would be willing to give up the gym if they were in a comfortable relationship.

Of the 64% of people in the UK who go to the gym, 24-34-year-olds are the most likely to go. 57% will train six or more times a month, costing them between £240 and £360 each year.

Almost 70% of people in Birmingham have a gym membership – the highest percentage within the UK. But Leicester takes the title for the most committed gym-goers, where over 80% of members train more than six times a month.

What about our waistlines? Despite dedicating time to physical exercise, almost a quarter of us admit to six or more cheat days per month, with a preference for pizza.

A third blame unhealthy eating habits on a lack of time to prepare meals ahead of work, 18% justify turning to treats because of their home environment and a further 15% say it’s down to the bad influence of their work colleagues.

More than 80% of people are motivated to exercise to improve health and wellbeing – but it seems that work and social commitments are to blame for making us too tired to train.

Your Hormones, Your Health


Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.

Irregular Periods


Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s — the reason can be perimenopause — the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.
Sleep Problems



If you aren’t getting enough shut-eye, or if the sleep you get isn’t good, your hormones could be at play. Progesterone, a hormone released by your ovaries, helps you catch Zzz’s. If your levels are lower than usual, that can make it hard to fall and stay asleep. Low estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, both of which can make it tough to get the rest you need.

Chronic Acne


A breakout before or during your period is normal. But acne that won’t clear up can be a symptom of hormone problems. An excess of androgens (“male” hormones that both men and women have) can cause your oil glands to overwork. Androgens also affect the skin cells in and around your hair follicles. Both of those things can clog your pores and cause acne.

Memory Fog


Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you’re having trouble thinking clearly.

Belly Problems


Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you’re digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.

Ongoing Fatigue



Are you tired all the time? Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of a hormone imbalance. Excess progesterone can make you sleepy. And if your thyroid — the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck — makes too little thyroid hormone, it can sap your energy. A simple blood test called a thyroid panel can tell you if your levels are too low. If they are, you can get treated for that.
chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Mood Swings and Depression


Researchers think drops in hormones or fast changes in their levels can cause moodiness and the blues. Estrogen affects key brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Appetite and Weight Gain



When you’re feeling blue or irritated, as you can be when your estrogen levels dip, you may want to eat more. That might be why drops in the hormone are linked to weight gain. The estrogen dip can also impact your body’s levels of leptin, a hunger-revving hormone.

Headaches


Lots of things can trigger these. But for some women, drops in estrogen bring them on. That’s why it’s common for headaches to strike right before or during your period, when estrogen is on the decline. Regular headaches or ones that often surface around the same time each month can be a clue that your levels of this hormone might be shifting.
Caginal Dryness


It’s normal to have this occasionally. But if you often notice that you’re dry or irritated down there, low estrogen may be the reason. The hormone helps vaginal tissue stay moist and comfortable. If your estrogen drops because of an imbalance, it can reduce vaginal fluids and cause tightness.

Loss of Libido


Most people think of testosterone as a male hormone, but women’s bodies make it, too. If your testosterone levels are lower than usual, you might have less of an interest in sex than you usually do.
Breast Changes


A drop in estrogen can make your breast tissue less dense. And an increase in the hormone can thicken this tissue, even causing new lumps or cysts. Talk to your doctor if you notice breast changes, even if you don’t have any other symptoms that concern you.

Your Hormones, Your Health

Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.