High Protein Snack Favourite

SAVOURY HIGH-PROTEIN QUINOA PANCAKESLooking for new breakfast ideas? You’ll love these savoury pancakes.


Not only easy to make, but also very versatile. You can add any ingredient you like.
You can even use them as a substitute for burger buns! Just whack a patty between two pancakes, add lettuce, tomato, onion and my healthy Aioli, voila low-carb burger!
Ingredients: (makes 5)
1 cooked full chicken breast

3 eggs

salt, pepper, tumeric powder & chili to taste

1/2 cup cooked quinoa

Method:
Using a food processor, blend all ingredients except the quiona together until completely smooth. Mixture will look just like a pancake batter.

A large tablespoonful of the mixture on a hot greased skillet and press down gently like a pancake. Sprinkle quinoa on top.

Cook for about 1 minute then flip to the other side.

Wake Up From a Dream Smoothie

  
This RecipeSkill Level: Beginner

Serves: 1

Start to Finish: less than 10 minutes

The protein from the milk in this smoothie increases energy by its metabolism-boosting effect, Kleiner says. “It’s also rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and potassium, which supports nerve conduction and muscle contraction and enables you to think more clearly and move more easily.”
Bonus: Cinnamon not only adds warm, sweet flavor, but this spice has also been shown to keep blood sugar levels in check by helping the body burn carbs for fuel.
Ingredients:

1/2 cup soy or almond milk

1/2 cup orange juice

1/2 frozen banana

2 tablespoons (1 scoop) vanilla whey protein isolate powder

1 teaspoon honey

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

1 large pinch ground ginger

5 to 8 ice cubes

Directions:

Place all ingredients together into a blender and blend until frothy and smooth.

Nutrition Facts

Amount per serving:

Total Calories: 285

167mg Sodium

39g Carbs

3g Fiber

3g Fat

0g Saturated Fat

28g Protein

252mg Calcium

1mg Iron

Braised Red Radishes

Red Recipe 5

Braised Red Radishes

20 plump radishes, red or multicolored
1 to 2 tbsp. butter
1 shallot, diced
1 tsp. chopped thyme or several pinches dried
Salt and freshly milled pepper

Trim the leaves from the radishes, leaving a bit of the green stems, and scrub them. If the leaves are tender and in good condition, wash them and set aside. Leave smaller radishes whole and halve or quarter larger ones.

Melt 2 to 3 tsp. butter in a small sauté pan. Add the shallot and thyme and cook for 1 minute over medium heat. Add the radishes, a little salt and pepper, and water just to cover. Simmer until the radishes are tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the leaves if using and cook until they’re wilted and tender, 1 minute more. Remove the radishes to a serving dish. Boil the liquid, adding a teaspoon or two more butter if you like, and until only about ¼ cup remains. Pour it over the radishes and serve.

From Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, by Deborah Madison


Eat Clean

Train Smart

Feel Great


Jax


Eat Well Wednesday – Balsamic Chicken

What to Eat Wednesday
1. Balsamic chicken
Balsamic vinegar makes a great chicken marinade.

1. Balsamic Chicken
Every cook needs a go-to recipe for a savory chicken dish. This recipe uses ingredients found in most pantries: balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and garlic. Chopped fresh rosemary adds a Mediterranean flavour. Try roasted sweet potatoes and a green salad to round out this comforting meal. Any leftovers are delicious in salads or sandwiches.
Ingredients
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced or 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
2 cloves garlic, minced
3/4teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
Directions
Combine rosemary, garlic, pepper and salt in small bowl; mix well.
Place chicken in large bowl; rub chicken with oil and then rub in spice mixture.
Cover and refrigerate several hours.
Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit (232 degrees Celsius). Spray heavy roasting pan or cast iron skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Place chicken in pan; bake 10 minutes. Turn chicken over, stirring in 3 to 4 tablespoons water if drippings begin to stick to pan.
Bake about 10 minutes or until chicken is golden brown and no longer pink in center. If pan is dry, stir in another 1 to 2 tablespoons water to de-glaze the pan.
Drizzle vinegar over chicken in pan. Transfer chicken to plates. Stir liquid in pan; drizzle over chicken. Garnish, if desired.20141022-101257-36777060.jpg

Eat Red Peppers #2!

Star Nutrients in Red Peppers

Get ready for a long list of nutrients when assessing the red pepper. This powerful vegetable contains vitamin C – and lots of it at over 156% of your total daily requirements.

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In addition to that, it’s also a great source of vitamin A, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin E, fiber, vitamin B2, pantothenic acid, vitamin B3, potassium, vitamin K, manganese, as well as vitamin B1. You’ll also get a small amount of phosphorus as well as magnesium when serving up this pepper as well.

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How Red Pepper Helps You Lose Weight

One of the most remarkable and notable benefits of red peppers in terms of fat loss is their capsaicin content, which is a compound that will increase your metabolic rate after consumption. While this vegetable doesn’t contain as much of this as a chili pepper does, it still does contain lower amounts and could spark an increase to your daily calorie burn.

Furthermore, as this vegetable does contain some fiber as well, it’ll help to manage your blood sugar levels, keeping your hunger down and making it easier to stick to your fat loss diet plan.

It also provides very strong anti-cancer benefits, so if you have a family history of this fatal disease, you’ll definitely want to make sure that you are taking in this vegetable regularly.

Combine this with the antioxidant benefits that also fend off heart disease and stroke and you have yourself a very powerful, health boosting vegetable.

So there you have the key facts to know about red peppers. Try serving them up stuffed with some ground turkey and diced vegetables, added to stir-fries, or simply grilled or tossed with a salad. There are so many delicious ways to prepare this vegetable that it’s unlikely you’ll become bored.

Eat Red Bell Peppers!

HEALTH BENEFITS OF RED PEPPER
Red pepper is easily what many people consider to be one of the tastiest vegetables and is definitely one that you should be including in your diet on a regular basis.

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Red peppers are the sweetest of the bell pepper family and offer plenty of potential in terms of how you can go about adding them to your meal plan.

Let’s go over all the key facts about red peppers and how they will help you move ahead with your diet protocol.

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Did You Know?

Bell peppers, red included, contain over 30 different types of carotenoids, so will offer a very high level of antioxidant support. In addition to that, only one other vegetable contains the level of carotenoids of this vegetable, illustrating just how powerful it is – the other vegetable being the tomato.

Bell peppers will give off the strongest nutritional benefits as they ripen, so for best nutritional support, try and eat this vegetable in its most ripe state whenever possible.

Also take note that cooking them with very high heat can reduce their nutritional potential, so you should also try serving them up raw or by using lower heat cooking techniques whenever possible.

More to follow including why red peppers are so good!

Jax

Why Should You Care About Pesticides? Dirty Dozen : Clean Fifteen

Why Should You Care About Pesticides?
This is an excerpt from interesting websites http://www.foodnews.org
And http://www.foodmatters.tv
If you’re interested in this kind of info. visit their sites.

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The growing consensus among scientists is that small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can cause lasting damage to human health, especially during fetal development and early childhood. Scientists now know enough about the long-term consequences of ingesting these powerful chemicals to advise that we minimize our consumption of pesticides.

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What’s the Difference?
EWG research has found that people who eat five fruits and vegetables a day from the Dirty DozenTM list consume an average of 10 pesticides a day. Those who eat from the 15 least contaminated conventionally-grown fruits and vegetables ingest fewer than 2 pesticides daily. The Guide helps consumers make informed choices to lower their dietary pesticide load.
Will Washing and Peeling Help?
The data used to create these lists is based on produce tested as it is typically eaten (meaning washed, rinsed or peeled, depending on the type of produce). Rinsing reduces but does not eliminate pesticides. Peeling helps, but valuable nutrients often go down the drain with the skin. The best approach: eat a varied diet, rinse all produce and buy organic when possible.

How Was This Guide Developed?
EWG analysts have developed the Guide based on data from nearly 89,000 tests for pesticide residues in produce conducted between 2000 and 2008 and collected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. You can find a detailed description of the criteria EWG used to develop these rankings and the complete list of fruits and vegetables tested at their dedicated website, http://www.foodnews.org.

Eat Clean, Train Mean, Feel Great

Jax