Your Hormones, Your Health


Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.

Irregular Periods


Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s — the reason can be perimenopause — the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.
Sleep Problems



If you aren’t getting enough shut-eye, or if the sleep you get isn’t good, your hormones could be at play. Progesterone, a hormone released by your ovaries, helps you catch Zzz’s. If your levels are lower than usual, that can make it hard to fall and stay asleep. Low estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, both of which can make it tough to get the rest you need.

Chronic Acne


A breakout before or during your period is normal. But acne that won’t clear up can be a symptom of hormone problems. An excess of androgens (“male” hormones that both men and women have) can cause your oil glands to overwork. Androgens also affect the skin cells in and around your hair follicles. Both of those things can clog your pores and cause acne.

Memory Fog


Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you’re having trouble thinking clearly.

Belly Problems


Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you’re digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.

Ongoing Fatigue



Are you tired all the time? Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of a hormone imbalance. Excess progesterone can make you sleepy. And if your thyroid — the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck — makes too little thyroid hormone, it can sap your energy. A simple blood test called a thyroid panel can tell you if your levels are too low. If they are, you can get treated for that.
chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Mood Swings and Depression


Researchers think drops in hormones or fast changes in their levels can cause moodiness and the blues. Estrogen affects key brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Appetite and Weight Gain



When you’re feeling blue or irritated, as you can be when your estrogen levels dip, you may want to eat more. That might be why drops in the hormone are linked to weight gain. The estrogen dip can also impact your body’s levels of leptin, a hunger-revving hormone.

Headaches


Lots of things can trigger these. But for some women, drops in estrogen bring them on. That’s why it’s common for headaches to strike right before or during your period, when estrogen is on the decline. Regular headaches or ones that often surface around the same time each month can be a clue that your levels of this hormone might be shifting.
Caginal Dryness


It’s normal to have this occasionally. But if you often notice that you’re dry or irritated down there, low estrogen may be the reason. The hormone helps vaginal tissue stay moist and comfortable. If your estrogen drops because of an imbalance, it can reduce vaginal fluids and cause tightness.

Loss of Libido


Most people think of testosterone as a male hormone, but women’s bodies make it, too. If your testosterone levels are lower than usual, you might have less of an interest in sex than you usually do.
Breast Changes


A drop in estrogen can make your breast tissue less dense. And an increase in the hormone can thicken this tissue, even causing new lumps or cysts. Talk to your doctor if you notice breast changes, even if you don’t have any other symptoms that concern you.

Your Hormones, Your Health

Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.
 

Carb Cycling – Be Prepared for Bloat!

Carb Cycling Notes
This one’s for Yas and Others that feel bloated after their cheat day!

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If you’ve been reading a variety of the fat-loss diet literature that’s available, you’ve very likely come across a technique called ‘carb cycling.’ Essentially carb cycling is a program where you mix higher carbohydrate days with lower carbohydrate days in the effort to lose weight without suffering some of the negative consequences of a pure low carbohydrate diet plan.

Some of these negative side effects include a drop in exercise performance, increased hunger and craving levels, lowered metabolic rate, and difficulty focusing and concentrating at work.

By having those higher carbohydrate days back in there, you offset some of these factors, so generally most people find this approach much more enjoyable to use. Before you hop onto the carb cycling diet program though, there are a few key facts that you must keep in mind and remember. Here’s what to know.

1 / High Carb Days Should Be Placed On Your Heavy Training Days
The very first thing you must know as you go about designing this type of diet program is that in order to see best results, you should be putting your highest carbohydrate diets on the days you perform your hardest workout sessions. For most people, this will mean leg day (or if you’re using a full body workout, it may mean going high carb on all three of those days).

The reason for doing this is simple – your body needs carbohydrates the most on these days. Having them before you do the workout will help fuel your workout so you can work harder and push more weight, and then having an influx of carbohydrates after the workout session will help saturate your muscles with stored carbohydrate (muscle glycogen) and aid recovery.

To ensure these carbs are put to best use and have the least likely chance of turning into body fat, this means timing them correctly throughout your week.

2 / Expect To Experience Some Water Weight Gain.
You must understand, and be prepared that you are likely to experience some water weight gain when doing the higher carbohydrate day. For every gram of carbohydrate you take into the body, you’ll store four grams of water with this. If you’re eating 200-300 grams of carbohydrates on those high carb days, about 1kg of bloats, water weight.

Those who are leaner, that’s you Y, tend to experience this effect the greatest because at that point, any water weight gain is highly noticeable. Try not to let yourself get too alarmed over this. It’s a normal process and is not fat gain. Within a day back on your regular low-carbohydrate plan you should notice this recede.

If you’re someone who really struggles psychologically with weight fluctuations (and how you appear in the mirror), this very well could mean carbohydrate cycling is not for you. It is a side effect of this type of plan, and therefore something for which you must absolutely prepare yourself.

I think, if you are lean – less than 10lbs to lose, try this method to cycle carbohydrates. It might be the way to drop the last few body fat % points.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Jax

Smelly Fart Problem?

Clean Up Your Farts!

Bad carbs, gut inflammation, and poor nutrient absorption.

It’s one thing to fart in public and hope that no one knows its you; it’s a whole different animal to think you’re about to squeak one out that’ll sound juicy, nasty, and make everyone look right at you. Today’s email is intended to make your farts quieter and safer for public 🙂

Bad Carbs Create “Gluten Farts”: These are the worst of the bunch, and I suspect that it’s the gluten that gave beans a bad name. It seems that beans, alone, don’t actually do what people say they do… but they are good for the heart, since they’re rich in protein and low in fat. It’s the white bread, flour, and starches that bloat you up, make you gaseous, and end up making you run to the bathroom to make sure there wasn’t an accident last time you let go.

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Gut Inflammation Creates “Risky Farts”: I define a risky fart as that moment of insecurity where you’re not sure you had the same level of control as normal, and you hope you’re not getting old. Others may refer to this as a SHART, but I disagree; that’s only when sphincter failure occurs. When your gut is inflamed, you’re bound to have less motor control, sensory feedback, and intensity control with contraction.

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Poor Nutrient Absorption Leads To “Stinky Farts”: When your digestive system builds up ‘gook,’ or poorly digested material, it coats the inner layer of your intestines, and prevents the absorption of many of the best nutrients you are eating; the gas you’re emitting contains poorly digested nutrients, which is why it smells so badly.

If you think you’ve been eating well, but it’s not working out, you may want to check out your gut and be sure you’re absorbing all the great superfoods you’re consuming.

One solution that seems to help it all is eating more baby carrots. The fibre content is really good for creating a mechanical effect in your gut, and getting rid of the ‘gook’ that’s built up. However, there are other great options if you’re sick of baby carrots, want to mix it up, or you need to take a more comprehensive approach after years of ‘wear and tear’ on your digestive tracts.

#3 – Cheat Which Foods To Choose?

Step 3: Observe.

You may notice you have a minor inflammatory reaction to certain foods, although it may not qualify as a ‘food allergy,’ per say.
Examples of this may include puffy eyes, cheeks, or missing definition around bony prominences (i.e. love handles) the day after eating a particular food.
Look at belly bloat too!

Note these results in your diary.
You will quickly learn which foods work for you, you will avoid them and notice your fat loss regulates and even increase.

Less systemic inflammation will help fat loss AND reduce your chances of many diseases and conditions.

Eat Clean. Cheat Well. Feel Great