Ellie – Testamonial

I met Ellie when she joined my Pilates sessions as a guest. A busy mother of a grown up family, walking her dogs twice daily, a keen dancer and working full time she needed a no nonsense solution to her needs.

This is Ellie’s transformation story.
(In her words)
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In May I went to the Doctor because I felt rubbish, I was tired, grumpy, sleeping poorly, my skin was dry and flaky, my hair was coarse and thinning and my nails were peeling and breaking.
I was overweight and nothing I tried could shift the excess.
The doctor suggested a Well Person MOT and blood tests. I also decided that I would also take matters in my own hands and start following more closely the nutritional and exercise advice offered by Jackie.
I started slowly, making little changes, then attended Jackie’s irks hop in June and it was a revelation. I learnt so much!! I feel better than I have for a long time, many, many friends and family have noticed too!
Everyone wanting to know what I had been doing to make such a transformation, including my GP when I went back for 2nd blood tests in July.
Hair, skin, nails, posture, sleep, energy and flexibility ( which has been noted at by dancing class) all improved. The classes are great fun too!
Thank you Jax

I will let the stats speak for themselves
MAY
Weight: 9st 6lbs
Dress Size: 10/12
Cholesterol: 5.6

JULY
Weight:8st 5lbs
Inches Lost: 13
Dress Size: 8
Cholesterol:4.2
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As you can see Ellie was very pleased with her results. She’s a great example of a client that gradually made nutritional changes, committed to regular exercise sessions and worked hard to stick to her simple plan.
She followed this blog, my twitter feed and joined my support group too.

If you read this and want the same results – get in touch for FREE trial. I have a few trials of 7, 14 and 21days to show just how simple it is to get REAL results without starvation, fad diets, crazy exercise, hours on the treadmill or running through mud!

I offer science based Nutritional Coaching, Intelligent group exercise, Support and guide acne based on over 30years experience working as fitness instructor and teacher trainer.

My sessions are based in my private wellness studio in Cheltenham – arrange your trial today – don’t put it off any longer.
Within a few weeks, just like Ellie, you could feel like a New woman!

Email: Jaxallenfitness@gmail.com
Text: 07831 680086
Friend me on Facebook: Jax Allen
Follow me on Twitter: JaxAllenFitness

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Jax

Why Crossfit May NOT Be Good For You

Why Crossfit May Not Be Good For You

I found this and thought you should have a read….. a few interesting points about who Crossfit is aimed at, how hard you should train and do the coaches have enough training?  Anyone can ‘Beast’ a client  not many can ‘Coach’ clients……

This discussion seems to make sense to me – Coach Boyle is very respected in his field and in the industry as a whole.

 

Michael Boyle
                       

Crossfit gyms are springing up all over the world. They are cheap and easy to open, with only a weekend certification and a few thousand dollars worth of equipment. This appeals to many in the fitness business. You can be part of a rapidly growing trend and you can do it without great expense. I am not a Crossfit fan so some might view this piece as yellow journalism. I will try to keep my personal opinions to myself and deal with what is generally agreed upon as safe in strength and conditioning.

First, a little background. To be honest, I knew very little about Crossfit until I was contacted by representatives of SOMA, the Special Operations Medical Association, in 2005. Crossfit was their concern, not mine. I was asked to come to the SOMA meeting in Tampa, Florida to discuss training special operations soldiers. At a panel discussion in 2005 I offered answers to questions asked about Crossfit and the controversy began. What follows is not from the SOMA meeting but, my thoughts since.

Major Question 1- Is planned randomization a valid concept. Crossfit is based on the idea that the workouts are planned but deliberately random. I think that the term planned randomization is an oxymoron. Workouts are either planned or random. I believe strongly that workouts should be planned and that a specific progression should be followed to prevent injury.

I sometimes plan sessions that relate to each other week to week – but not Day to Day – is this also planned randomisation.

But seriously, I know what Coach Boyle means. To be effective programmes should gradually build in frequency, intensity, duration and type of training, over the short and very long term.

 

Major Question 2- Is Training to Failure Safe? Because Crossfit is, at it’s heart, a competitive or self-competitive program it becomes necessary to train to failure. There are two layers or problem here. One is the simple question of whether training to failure is beneficial to the trainee. Some strength and conditioning experts believe training to failure is beneficial, others caution against. I must admit that I like training to failure.

However, this brings up the larger question of what constitutes failure. Strength and Conditioning Coach Charles Poliquin (another non-Crossfit fan) popularized the term “technical failure” and, this is the definition that we adhere to.

Technical failure occurs not when the athlete or client is no longer capable of doing the exercise but, when the athlete or client can no longer do the exercise with proper technique. In training beyond technical failure the stress shifts to tissues that were not, and probably should not, be the target of the exercise. The third layer of the training to failure question relates to what movements lend themselves to training to failure. In the area of “generally agreed as safe”, high velocity movements like Olympic lifts and jumps are not generally done to failure and never should be taken beyond technical failure. Is it one bad rep versus multiple bad reps? How many bad reps is too many?

It seems mad to train beyond the point of having good form (therefore safe execution of the exercise)

 

Major Question 3- Is an overuse injury (generally an injury caused by repeated exposure to light loads), different from an overstress injury (an injury caused by exposure to heavy loads). Both are injuries.

The first is overuse, the second is trauma. In my mind injuries are injuries, period.

I agree – I am always looking for ways to include mobilisations to improve movement patterns, prepare for training and get more value out of the warm-up/prep phase of every workout.  My 5 week programme gives us a chance to really focus on muscle balance, injury prevention, 3 Dimension training and recovery.

 

Major Question 4- Should adults be Olympic lifters? I don’t think that Olympic lifts are for all adults. Most adults can’t get their arms safely over their head once much less fifty times with load. The other question that begs to be asked is should anyone do high rep Olympic lifts. I know the best Olympic lifters in the world say no. With all that said believe it or not my biggest problem is actually less with the actual workouts than it is with the false bravado and character assassination of dissenters. The community can be pretty venomous when you question Coach Glassman.

 

The Crossfit community is also filled with people who tell you that injury is a normal part of the training process. I have spoken up against endurance athletes who willingly hurt themselves and to me, this is no difference than the current Crossfit controversy. I know that this will generate more controversy but, Crossfit might be the biggest controversy in strength and conditioning since HIT training.

I use HIIT as a method in some programs….

Quite different to HIT.

HIT is High Intensity Training, HIIT is High Intensity Interval Training….  I can vary the interval to build endurance before I progress the load/weigh Intensity to improve strength.

This way, beginners can work alongside experienced clients without fear of injury or embarrassment!

 

 

Hope this will encourage you to question training methods and the quality of the ‘coaching’ available to you.

 

Jax Allen Fitness