Use this Spice to Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity! 

A simple, scientifically proven trick to not only fight belly fat, but control blood sugar levels (and fight carbs)…
This spice that I’m going to mention is one of the most overlooked, but healthiest spices in the world…
You might even call it a “fat burning spice”… in a roundabout


And yes, it can actually help you win the battle against abdominal fat if you use it daily…I’ll explain why.
Here are some other benefits of this miracle spice:
controls blood sugar levels

helps maintain insulin sensitivity

a VERY powerful antioxidant

may have antibacterial and antifungal properties

and dozens of other benefits

So what is this miracle spice that beats abdominal fat?
Well… it’s good old tasty Cinnamon!


Although cinnamon does NOT directly increase fat burning (such as by increasing metabolic rate, etc), it CAN actually help you to burn off abdominal fat and get leaner in an indirect way
Here’s how…
Although cinnamon has dozens of health benefits, the main benefit that will help you to get leaner is through it’s strong effect on controlling blood sugar levels in your body.
In a study published in 2003 in the medical journal Diabetes Care, groups were split into people taking 1, 3, or 6 grams of cinnamon per day in capsule form (the equivalent of approx 1/4th to 1 teaspoon of cinnamon).
The results of the study showed that all 3 amounts of cinnamon reduced fasting blood glucose levels by 18-29% after 40 days.
Cinnamon can also increase insulin sensitivity, which essentially means that it is helping your body to control blood sugar while simultaneously allowing your body to produce less insulin.
As you know, chronically high insulin levels can make your body pack on the blubber.

How to harness cinnamon to lose stubborn belly fat…
One possible way to benefit from cinnamon to lose more fat is to use cinnamon daily in your meals when you can, such as in yogurt or cottage cheese, in smoothies, oatmeal, or anything else you can think of where it would go well.
Also, you could use a cinnamon capsule before each of your meals, particularly if you’re going to have more than 30 grams of carbs in that meal.
This could help to control blood sugar and insulin response from your meals and thereby control your appetite and cravings throughout the day… hence, helping you to lose body fat more effectively over time.
So now you can see that not only is cinnamon a powerful antioxidant that can help you stay youthful longer, it can also help you to control blood sugar and get a leaner body!

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Can You Snack Healthy?

There are more options than you think!!

Sometimes, the whole world of snacking seems to be based on the one thing you’re supposed to limit: refined carbs. Even the “healthier” packaged items, like granola bars, smoothies, and crackers, are full of them. If you look past the vending machine, though, you’ll find plenty of other tasty options, like these smart snacks. The best part? They’re as easy to toss together as they are delicious. 

#1 Low carb snack

Apples and Cheese

  
Sweet and salty flavors add up to a great snack. Pair half a cup of apple slices with string cheese for about 10 grams of carbs. The combination of protein, fat, and fiber makes it a filling and satisfying nosh.
#2 low carb snack

Avocado on a Crisp

  
Avocados have a place in your diet outside the guacamole bowl. Mash one-quarter of a ripe avocado and spread it on two light rye crisps for a crunchy, creamy snack with 18 grams of carbs, plus plenty of fiber and heart-healthy fat. It’s like a mini open-faced sandwich.
#3 low carb snack

Yogurt and Cucumbers
  Take your yogurt in a savory direction. Use a cup of low-fat, plain Greek yogurt as a creamy dip for 1 cup of refreshing cucumber spears. It adds up to12 grams of carbs and a mega dose (20 grams) of appetite-satisfying protein. It’s like a version of the famous Greek dish, tzatziki.

#4 low carb snack

Turkey Roll-Ups

  
Deli turkey has uses beyond a sandwich filling. Lose the bread and roll up 1 ounce of sliced turkey in lettuce leaves with mustard. This light, crisp snack has about 3 grams of carbs and will get you through the afternoon.

#5 low carb snack 

Cottage Cheese With Berries

  
Cheesecake doesn’t make for a healthy snack option, but you can mimic a little of the flavor in a healthier way. Pair a cup of low-fat cottage cheese with half a cup of fresh or frozen blueberries and a little of your favorite no-calorie sweetener. The result? A dessert-like snack with 18 grams of carbs.

#6 low carb snack

Better Beef Jerky

   
Jerky has been going upscale in recent years, and there are better options now than the over-processed mystery-meat versions you’ve had before. Look for jerkies made from grass-fed beef, which have big flavor and just 10 grams of carbs per serving (about 1.5 ounces). 

#7 low carb snack

Celery and Peanut Butter

  
Remember eating this snack with your homework after school? It’s still a good idea! Fill two medium celery stalks with 2 tablespoons of natural-style peanut butter for a nibble that will take you back to your childhood, with only 9 grams of carbs.

#8 low carb snack

Hardboiled Egg With a Kick Nuts

  
Mixed nuts are an all-time snack classic for good reason. They’re just as satisfying at your desk as they are at a party. One ounce of crunchy, salty, mixed nuts will keep your energy up for hours for only 5 grams of carbs per ounce.

Hard-boiled eggs are the original grab-‘n’-go power snack. Cut one in half and spread on a little hot sauce (such as sriracha) to make it as full of flavor as it is of protein. That’s a zesty bite for less than 1 gram of carbs.

#9 low carb snack

Nuts

  
Mixed nuts are an all-time snack classic for good reason. They’re just as satisfying at your desk as they are at a party. One ounce of crunchy, salty, mixed nuts will keep your energy up for hours for only 5 grams of carbs per ounce.

#10 low carb snack
Kale Chips

  
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.

#11 low carb snack

  
Edamame

Also called steamed soybeans, edamame taste great, are full of fiber and protein, and have just 8 grams of carbs in a half cup of shelled edamame. They’re easy to make in your microwave, so keep a bag in your freezer.

#12 low carb snack

Hummus and Red Bell Pepper Wedges

  
Though they’re often spotted together, hummus isn’t married to high-carb pita bread. Spread 1/4 cup of hummus onto wedges cut from one red bell pepper for a filling, tasty snack that has 16 grams of carbs.

#13 low carb snack 

  
Stuffed Tomato

Get the health benefits from tuna without all the carbs that come with your typical tuna sandwich. Pack 3 ounces of canned tuna into a ripe tomato half for a hearty snack with only 3.5 grams of carbs.

Coca-Cola ‘trying to manipulate public’ on sugar-obesity link

Coca-Cola has spent millions of pounds funding research institutes and scientists who cast doubt on the link between sugary drinks and obesity.


The drinks firm is said to have links to more than a dozen British scientists, including government health advisers, who counter claims that its drinks contribute to obesity.

The revelation of Coca-Cola’s scientific funding comes weeks after the government rejected a tax on sugar sweetened drinks, despite support from Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies, the British Medical Association and TV chef Jamie Oliver.

An investigation by The Times published on Friday revealed the full scale of Coca-Cola’s funding of scientists.

According to the investigation, Coca-Cola spent £4.86 million setting up the European Hydration Institute (EHI), a seemingly independent research foundation which has recommended sport and soft drinks of the sort the company sells to the public, including children.

The newspaper claimed that Ron Maughan, chairman of the EHI’s scientific advisory board, is an emeritus professor from a university which received almost £1 million from Coca-Cola while he provided nutritional advice to leading sports bodies.

Maughan has advised UK Athletics and the Football Association and has also been a consultant for Coca-Cola and other drinks companies since the 1990s, according to The Times.

Coca-Cola is said to have provided support, sponsorship or research funding to a variety of British organizations including UKActive, the British Nutrition Foundation, the University of Hull, Homerton University Hospital, the National Obesity Forum, the British Dietetic Association, Obesity Week 2013 and the UK Association for the Study of Obesity.

Through its trade organizations, Coca-Cola representatives have met government officials and ministers more than 100 times between 2011 and 2014, according to The Times. Coca-Cola is also said to host a parliamentary dinner.

Faculty of Public Health board member Simon Capewell accused Coca-Cola of trying to shape public opinion.

Coca-Cola is trying to manipulate not just public opinion but policy and political decisions. Its tactics echo those used by the tobacco and alcohol industries, which have also tried to influence the scientific process by funding apparently independent groups. It’s a conflict of interest that flies in the face of good practice,” he said.

New York-based nutrition researcher Marion Nestle warned scientists should not take money from Coca-Cola.

In my opinion, no scientist should accept funding from Coca-Cola. It’s totally compromising. Period. End of discussion,” said Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health.

Coca-Cola of Great Britain said: “We rely on scientific research to make decisions about our products and ingredients and commission independent third parties to carry out this work.”

Professor Maughan recognized “the need for caution” over industry funding but said that much good research would not otherwise have taken place. Loughborough said its research studies were subject to a strict code of conduct.

Is Sugar Your Enemy?

Sugar Facts
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Sugar is empty calories and a poison for your health, vitality, longevity and fat loss. When you consume sugar, glucose levels rise. Your body tries to balance your glucose so your insulin levels go up. Shortly after, glucose levels plummet and crash causing low blood sugar, which triggers intense and increased cravings for more sugar. If you give in to your craving your glucose levels rise back up. This vicious cycle continues. The end result is low energy, moodiness, fatigue, hormonal imbalances, weight gain, insulin resistance and an increased risk of diabetes.
Sugar stimulates pleasure centers in the brain. Cravings provide insight into your unique metabolism and are a sign of imbalances often in conjunction to specific nutrient deficiencies and neurotransmitter imbalances.
If you find yourself craving sugar, it’s important to determine the root cause and understand why you crave sugar to break the cycle of addiction.

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Reasons for sugar cravings:
• You’re not properly nourished with a balance of nutrient-rich food.
• Candida, intestinal yeast and parasites.
• Hormone fluctuations and imbalances.
• Neurotransmitter imbalances.
• Insufficient sleep.
• Dehydration.
• Insulin resistance, blood sugar fluctuations and imbalances.
• Unmanaged stress and adrenal dysfunction. High or low cortisol, or a problem with the cortisol rhythm.
• Nutrient deficiencies.
• Digestive problems, bacterial imbalances and hypochlorhydria.
• Recovering alcoholic. Former alcoholics often replace alcohol with sweets and sugary beverages without realizing that sugar disrupts nutrient balance and intestinal flora, promoting Candida and other fungi. Under certain conditions these pathogenic yeasts actually convert sugars in the gut to alcohol. Walk into any AA meeting and you’ll find a spread of candy, cakes and cookies. Some recovering alcoholics will even convert the sugar to alcohol metabolically and maintain their alcohol addiction in this way. There are well-documented cases of inebriation caused by sugar consumption and Candida overgrowth in persons who abstain from alcohol.

The body is a wonderful thing!

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Jax

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 4

To Go Paleo Or Not? PT 4

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Evolution of the human GI tract
In Paleo circles, it’s sometimes said that while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10,000 years, our genes have changed very little. And further, that we really only thrive in a world with similar conditions to the Paleolithic era.
Quite frankly, this is not how evolution or genetic expression works.
If humans and other organisms could thrive only in circumstances similar to the ones their predecessors lived in, life would not have lasted very long.
Examples of the ways we have evolved in the past 10,000 years abound.
For example, over the past 8,000 years or so, about forty per cent of us have developed the capacity to consume dairy for a lifetime. As a species, we’re evolving a mutation whereby we continue to produce the lactase enzyme to break down lactose for far longer periods than our ancestors ever could. True, not everyone can digest lactose well, but more of us can do so than ever before.
And studies have shown that even people who don’t digest lactose well are capable of consuming moderate amounts of dairy, tolerating an average 12 grams of lactose at a time (the amount of lactose in one cup of milk) with few to no symptoms.

Additionally, the emerging science of epigenetics is showing that a “blueprint” alone isn’t enough — genes can be “switched off” or “on” by a variety of physiological and environmental cues.

Gut knowledge
Our digestive systems have adapted over millennia to process a low-energy, nutrient-poor, and presumably high-fibre diet. Meanwhile, Western diets have become high-energy, low-fibre, and high-fat.
Our genes produce only the enzymes necessary to break down starch, simple sugars, most proteins, and fats. They aren’t well adapted to cope with a steady influx of chicken nuggets, Potato chips, and ice cream.
So how is it that we can still digest our food, albeit imperfectly at times?
Thank the trillions of bacteria that live in our gut. These friendly critters interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibres, releasing bound phytonutrients and anti-oxidants, and helping us to assimilate many important compounds.
Now, we don’t have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be pretty confident that our ancestors’ microbial communities would not exactly match our own.
That’s because bacteria evolve and adapt at a rate much faster than our slow human genes. And for us, that’s a good thing.

It helps to explain why, even if the ancient human diet didn’t include grains, legumes, dairy, and other relatively modern agricultural products, we still might thrive on such a diet today – at least, with a little help from our bacterial friends.

The magical microbiome
Thanks to the Human Microbiome Project and other massive research projects around the world, we now know that trillions of microorganisms from thousands of different species inhabit the human body.
In fact, the total genetic makeup of these little creatures is at least 100 times greater than our own! (Essentially, we’re only 1% human. Think about that.)
This vast genetic diversity ensures that our GI tracts can adapt rapidly to changes in diet and lifestyle.
A single meal can change the type of bacteria that populate your gut. And as little as several days on a new diet can lead to dramatic changes in the bacterial populations in your GI tract.
The diverse, complex, and dynamic nature of our microbiome helps to explain why some of us seem to do well on one type of diet, while others will feel and perform better with another type of diet — even though, genetically, we’re all 99% the same!
Many of us can break down the more “modern” food compounds that Paleo advocates claim we do not tolerate well — simply because our intestines harbour bacteria that have evolved to do that job.

For instance, some Japanese people host unique bacteria that can help them digest seaweed.
And many people can alleviate symptoms of lactose intolerance by eating yogurt or other probiotic-rich foods that provide lactose-digesting bacteria.
So even if you don’t naturally break down lactose well, it’s possible, through the right combination of foods and/or probiotic supplements, to persuade the bacteria in your gut to do this job on your behalf.
What’s more, the same strategy could also address gluten intolerance. Recent research shows that some bacteria actually produce enzymes that break down gluten — as well as phytic acid — reducing any inflammatory or anti-nutrient effects.
Which, as we know, are two of the main reasons people recommend starting Paleo diets in the first place.

Modern Paleo research
No matter how you slice it, the Paleo proponents’ evolutionary arguments just don’t hold up.
But that doesn’t mean that the diet itself is necessarily bad.
Maybe it’s a good diet for completely different reasons than they say.
To find out if that is so, a number of researchers have been putting Paleo diets to the test with controlled clinical trials. And so far, the results are promising, though incomplete.

Paleo vs. Mediterranean diets
Perhaps the best known of these researchers is Dr. Lindeberg — the one who also studied the Kitavan Islanders. He and his colleagues have conducted two clinical trials testing the efficacy of the Paleo diet.
In the first, they recruited diabetic and pre-diabetic volunteers with heart disease and placed them on one of two diets:
A “Paleolithic” diet focused on lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, starchy root vegetables, eggs, and nuts, or
A “Mediterranean” diet focused on whole grains, low-fat dairy, vegetables, fruit, fish, oils, and margarine.

After 12 weeks, the Mediterranean group lost body fat and saw an improvement in markers of diabetes. Four of the nine participants with diabetic blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study had normal levels by the end. That’s a very good result and must have made the participants happy.

But those in the Paleo group fared even better.
They lost 70 percent more body fat than the Mediterranean group and also normalized their blood sugars. In fact, all ten participants with diabetic blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study reached non-diabetic levels by the end of the study.
By any estimation, that is an astonishing result.
Now, these volunteers were suffering from mild, early cases of diabetes. But a second study of long-term diabetics showed that a Paleo diet didn’t cure them but it did improve their condition significantly.

Other research has found:
The Paleo diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean diet.
The Paleo diet improves blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and blood lipids.
However, one caveat: Like most low-carb trials, the macronutrients (especially protein) in these studies weren’t matched.
The Paleo group ate a lot more protein, compared to the other diet groups. Plenty of protein helps keep our lean mass dense and strong, stay lean, and feel satisfied by our meals.
So, we’re not just comparing apples to oranges when protein intakes are different; this is more like comparing grains to goat meat. Literally.

The Paleo diet may indeed be the best plan, but it’s hard to know for sure without direct comparisons that match macronutrients and calories.

Conclusion & recommendations
What does the Paleo diet get right?
A. Despite the faulty evolutionary theory it’s based on, in the end, the Paleo diet likely gets more right than it gets wrong.
B. Paleo-style eating emphasizes whole foods, lean proteins, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and other healthy fats, which is a massive improvement over the average Western diet.
C. Paleo-style eating has been extremely effective for improving several chronic diseases. That alone is a huge plus.
D. Paleo-style eating has made us more aware of how processed and crappy a lot of our 21st century food is.
However, we need more rigorous (and carefully matched) trials before we can reach any definitive conclusions.

What are the challenges?
Despite its obvious benefits over the typical Western diet, the Paleo diet has some flaws.
The evidence for excluding dairy, legumes, and grains isn’t (yet) strong. So as a nutrition coach, I can’t say it’s a one-size-fits-all prescription. Certainly, some people should avoid dairy and gluten, and control legume and grain consumption. But most of us can improve the way we look, feel, and perform without completely eliminating these foods.
The evolutionary arguments don’t hold up. The human body isn’t simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic era. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits (and microorganisms) that have been tweaked, transformed, lost, and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have continued over the past 10,000 years — and won’t stop any time soon.

In the broader sense, strictly following a list of “good” and “bad” or “allowed” and “not allowed” foods tends to be problematic for most people. Generally, this approach leads to anxiety and all-or-nothing thinking. Maybe it makes us feel more confident and (falsely) sure of ourselves in the short term. But it’s less effective over the long-term — because ultimately, it decreases our consistency.
This may explain why we are seeing the Paleo diet itself evolve.
It’s evolution, baby
Many Paleo advocates have recently come to appreciate and encourage the addition of moderate amounts of starch (albeit a more limited variety of options than I would prefer), as well as some dark chocolate, red wine and non-grain spirits (such as tequila), and grass-fed dairy.
These additions make life much more pleasant. They make healthy eating more attractive and achievable.
In fact, this new “leniency” may partly explain why the Paleo diet continues to gain traction in mainstream nutrition circles.
Because in the end, moderation, sanity and your personal preferences are more important than any specific food list, anti-nutrient avoidance, or evolutionary theory.

What to do today
Consider the good things about ancestral lifestyles. This includes fresh food, fresh air, lots of movement, good sleep, and a strong social network.
How could you get just a little bit of these in your life today?
Think about how you could move along the spectrum — from processed 21st century life and food — to choices that are a little more in tune with what your ancient body needs and loves.
Learn a little more about your ancestors. Evolution is cool. Dig into your roots: Where did your people come from? What were their ancestral diets?
Keep it simple and sane. Doing a few good things pretty well (like getting a little extra sleep or fresh veggies) is much better than trying to get a lot of things “perfect”.
Stay critical and informed. Avoid dogmatic or cultish thinking. Be skeptical. Look for evidence. Question everything. Primal eating is a super cool idea and may turn out to be more or less right; just keep your late-evolving prefrontal cortex (aka your thinky brain) in the game as you consider all the options.
Help your old body (and your trillions of little buddies) do their jobs. Our bodies are resilient. We didn’t get to be one of the dominant species on the planet by being fussy, delicate flowers.

Nevertheless, think about how you can nourish your body optimally in order to give your body and microbiome the best chance of surviving and thriving.

Eat Clean, Stay Active. Feel Great
Jax

Common Spice Cures Diabetes! NO WAY?

The Kitchen Cupboard Remedy for Diabetes


 

Another article from my current favourite website…..

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Dear Reader,

What if I told you that an all-natural spice found in apple pie — and probably sitting in your kitchen cabinet right now — could give you all of these benefits…

  • Better blood sugar control…
  • Better triglyceride (blood fat) levels…
  • Better LDL cholesterol levels…
  • Better total cholesterol levels…


Well, that’s exactly what you get with Cinnamon, the dried inner bark of a tree from Sri Lanka.

And it’s all down to cinnamon’s active compound, called Methyhydroxy Chalcone Polymer — or MHCP, for short — which boosts the activity of insulin by about 20 times, allows glucose to pass more easily from the bloodstream into the cells, and helps your body burn excess sugar levels in your bloodstream.

Proven In Scientific Studies…

Cinnamon’s incredible effects on blood sugar levels isn’t just wishful thinking. It’s been proven in scores of well-documented studies to help tame out-of-control blood sugar and help keep it in the safety zone.

For example, according to a study at the University of Hannover, Germany, and published in theEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation, cinnamon was shown to have a powerful effect on elevated blood sugar levels.

In the placebo-controlled, double-blind study, researchers gave 79 patients either cinnamon or a placebo pill for four months. The results? Patients taking cinnamon experienced a 10.3% reduction in blood sugar levels while the placebo group only received a 2.4% reduction.

In another study published in The Journal of Diabetic Medicine, researchers tested cinnamon against popular diabetes drugs. They gave one group the drugs. The other group took only cinnamon. And the results were conclusive: The participants in the cinnamon group had much better blood sugar control than the drug-only group.

And in another study, Dr. Richard Anderson and colleagues at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Maryland, USA, performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on patients with blood sugar problems. They gave the patients either one, three, or six grams of cinnamon or an equal dose of a placebo and tested blood sugar levels at 0… 40… and 60-day intervals.

The results were interesting to say the least. In the placebo group, patients experienced zero or only very miniscule improvements in blood glucose levels, triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels.

Yet, the patients taking cinnamon had impressive improvements in blood glucose readings and had better triglyceride, total cholesterol and lower LDL (bad cholesterol) levels.

Long-Term, Spectacular Results…

What’s more, the researchers found that the longer the patients took cinnamon, the better their results.

Indeed, 60-day readings proved better than 40-day readings. All told, there have been more than 50 separate studies done on cinnamon’s effects on blood glucose levels. And in every case, patients got much better blood sugar control and cholesterol levels.

In addition, cinnamon works fast — in a matter of mere days or even hours! So it doesn’t just work better the longer you take it… it works almost from the very first dose!

So inspired were they by cinnamon’s unique healing qualities that two health pioneers teamed up to research the scientific proof for dozens of other natural blood sugar-busting remedies.

And what they discovered has now been turned into a single, 11 ingredient drug-free formulation which has been scientifically proven to be 3 times more effective than top-selling diabetes drugs in to ONE perfect drug-free solution… There’s a full report about this here.

A breakthrough that could change your life for ever…

Dr. Vern Cherewatenko and Ken Hampshire — two of the most knowledgeable experts on the planet when it comes to dealing with type 2 diabetes — set out to formulate the perfect blend of natural substances that would equip your body’s own ability to achieve perfect regulation of your blood sugar.

Dr. Vern Cherewatenko is pretty famous in the US. Not only is he a practising doctor at his own private clinic, his book The Diabetes Cure: A Natural Plan That Can Slow, Stop, Even Cure Type 2 Diabetesbecame an instant bestseller.

You see, Dr Vern completely understands what it’s like to be diabetic since he himself is a former type 2 diabetic. But, Dr Vern managed to rid himself of type 2 diabetes using the same secrets that he now shares with thousands of his patients who visit him at his clinic in Renton, Washington.

But as good as his book is, Dr. Vern never rests on his laurels…

That’s why, along with Ken Hampshire, he set out to look at all the latest cutting-edge research emanating from all the leading medical authorities on diabetes.

And what they came up with after years of research was a breakthrough new super formula designed to help patients to…

  • Control blood sugar…
  • Boost the action and release of insulin…
  • Help patients lose weight without restrictive diets…
  • Help improve blood pressure and lower “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides…
  • Fight the deadly and debilitating complications of diabetes…
  • And, above all, to do it naturally — free from drugs that can trigger other nasty side effects.


But here’s the game changer. It’s all very well designing a new formula and telling people that it should work for them in theory… but it’s quite another matter proving it in a rigorous, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. 

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So, I think it might be worth adding a supplement of 3 or 6g of cinnamon daily for week or two and see what it does to bodyfat stores. As high or fluctuating blood sugar stimulates fat storage, anything that will control and reduce blod sugar will help our attempts to reduce body fat stores.

I’ll let you know how I get on – perhaps you’lltry it too and report back here?

 

Eat Clean   Live Well   Feel Great

 

Jax

 

Sugar – Your Biggest Enemy?

Study Shows Sugary Drinks Cause Inflammation

A placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial, carried out recently at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, showed that drinking low to moderate amounts of sugary drinks for just three weeks disrupted glucose and lipid metabolism and promoted inflammation in healthy young men, in ways that could lead to type 2 diabetes5.

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Fructose Leads to Abdominal Fat & Obesity

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Even more worrying is evidence that fructose, the main sugar in sweetened soft drinks, alters the way developing fat cells in children’s bodies behave, leading to insulin resistance and abdominal obesity, both of which can contribute to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Eat Clean. Feel Great.

Jax