Beetroot Cherries & Caffeine

http://www.creators.com/Beetroot Juice May Be a Better Sports Drink

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This article continues from the TV program last Monday evening about Beetroot juice and the research done at Coventry university in the UK.
For an energy boost during and to reduce muscle soreness after hard exercise beetroot juice shots and maybe Cherry juice are the way to go.
There’s also an update on caffeine, however I prefer the non- stimulant route.
Go over and visit the site to read the article.

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3. Problems With DOMS

3. The Problem With Using Muscle Soreness As A Guide

Muscle soreness tells you if you’ve done more than you can handle.

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It tells you if you can handle a little bit more.

It tells you that you’ve recently done something new, different, or that your body wasn’t used to or even ready for.

But, it doesn’t really tell you how well or poorly you’ve performed. It may define quantity more than quality. So be careful there.

I hope you found these posts interesting. Informative and helpful.

Eat Clean. Train Hard. Feel Great

Jax.

Right and wrong exercise can have the same results.

Wrong exercise may not be good for you in the long run — causing pain, discomfort and injury — but in the short term it can still help you drop weight, shed fat, and build muscle.

In that regard, Biggest Loser works. Crossfit works. Zumba works.
Fit Camps work. Everything works.

And if it’s different enough, you’ll be sore.

Muscle soreness is welcomed sensory feedback.

Just remember, it’s a signal that your muscles are damaged and your performance is compromised. It also means — especially for the beginner — that you’ll be better off helping the healing process through recovery methods, as opposed to continually upping your workout intensity and pushing the envelope. That’s why my clients have rest days, rest intervals and De load sessions.

Muscle soreness is one way of judging your workout. It means something. It just doesn’t mean everything.

2 The Dark Side of DOMS!

2. The Darker Side Of Muscle Soreness

Yes, sore muscles can feel good. In more ways than one. It’s sensory validation of a hard-fought workout.

A pat on the back, if you will.

But do you want to be sore all of the time? I know I don’t !!

Muscle soreness has been shown to be associated with decreased strength, power, range of motion and neuromuscular function.

Ultimately, that constant soreness will have a negative effect on your performance.

If you’re not careful, and push yourself too far too fast, or for too long, you can cross the threshold of Rhabdomyolosis.

If you follow the Crossfit debates, may be familiar with the term.

Rhabdomyolosis occurs when you’ve damaged the muscle tissue to such an extent that it breaks down completely.
Not a good thing.

However, that’s the extreme end of things. And ground only walked by an irresponsible coach and uninformed trainee. Since you’re reading my blog, you don’t fall into either of these camps.
So no worries.

More next time….

Did You get A Good Workout Today?

Did you get in a good workout today?

Let’s talk about muscle soreness and what it means … Today, and all week we’ll look at the issues that surround training intensity and effect.

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How do you know whether it was good or not?

There are many ways to judge…..

1. Did you break a good sweat?
2. Did you do more than usual?
3. Did you get a good burn on?
4. Did you decrease your time?
5. Did you increase your distance?
Some of these are more subjective measures than others. But that doesn’t mean one is a better or worse way of judging your physical activity.

While numbers are an objective way of judging and mapping progress, how you feel matters, too.

And, interestingly, a lot of us — especially beginners — judge a workout by how they feel after the session has ended. Both immediately and for the next several days. And this is despite how much effort they put in or what their form was like!

For a metabolic effect you must hit a few targets..
Heat – you must get hot ( some of us don’t sweat much)
Burn – muscle burn
Heavy – overload your muscles
Hard – intensity must be high.

More next tomorrow …….

Eat Clean. Train hard. Expect Results

Jax

Should You Work A Sore Muscle?

Should You Work A Sore Muscle?

This week I decided it was time to get some serious training into my own program. I woke up the Tuesday sore as @#$%.

Quite sore, then – Oh yes!

So naturally, I worked out – But not Bootcamp – I joined in with a complete Yoga class…….. Huh? Surely not, I hear you say?       You’re meant to rest for 48hrs or until the soreness eases off….. I don’t agree with this idea – anymore.

Most of us have only specific days and times free to train, time is so precious. Fortunately, I don’t adhere to that silliness anymore, and as a result, I’m able to offer great body transformation results in just a few weeks.

You see, it’s not uncommon for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) to last four or even five days after the completion of an intense training session; however, many studies have concluded that complete metabolic recovery (what you care about) occurs within 48 hours of exercise. In other words, you ARE recovered, yet there is still some residual soreness. Plain and simple, if metabolic recovery has taken place, a muscle can be worked again via the same training method, even if the muscle is still sore from a previous session.

Having said that, plenty of studies have shown that training a muscle while it is still recovering does NOT adversely affect recovery.

Here are just a few: Nosaka K, Clarkson P.M. Muscle damage following repeated bouts of high force eccentric exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exrc., 27(9):1263-1269,1995. Smith LL., Fuylmer MG., Holbert D., McCammon MR., Houmard JA., Frazer DD., Nsien E., Isreal RG.

The impact of repeated bout of eccentric exercise on muscular strength, muscle soreness and creatine kinase. Br J Sp Med 28(4):267-271, 1994. Chen, TC and S.S. Hsieh.

The effects of a seven-day repeated eccentric training on recovery from muscle damage. Med. Sci. Sports Exrc. 31(5 Supp) pp. S71, 1999. Nosaka K and M Newton.

Repeated eccentric exercise bouts do not exacerbate muscle damage and repair. J Strength Cond Res. 2002 Feb;16(1):117-22.

Conclusion: even if complete metabolic recovery has not yet occurred, the muscle can be trained again.

Now, technically, you could do the same exact workout again, but frankly, there are better ways to approach working a muscle for a second time within 48 hours of a previous session: and I’m sure you know my view on repeating workouts – WE DON’T DO THAT!

Option #1 – Conduct an “active recovery” session. With this approach you’d conduct a light, less taxing training session after a heavy, demanding session in order to facilitate recovery, decrease DOMS, and actually maximize strength gains. Simply put, as long as you continue to stimulate the nervous system, even if your body is not totally recovered (metabolically speaking), you’re going to see much better overall results. An example of this “continued stimulation” would be to do half the number of reps that you normally could do with a given weight, or perhaps train for half the normal time.

To illustrate, let’s say you did a killer workout on Monday. Like Ladders!! LOL. And let’s say you used resistance ( Bands and Med Balls) about 30 minutes of maximal effort. The active recovery method would suggest that on Tuesday, you’d only do 15 minutes with the same intensity. This type of workout both stimulates the nervous system and increases the flow of nutrient rich blood to the recovering muscles, leading to increased strength and recovery.

Option #2 – Change the stimulus and go all out again. If a muscle is still recovering, it wouldn’t be profitable to train it again via the same training method prior to recovery taking place. Yes, the above studies show that doing so will not substantially, adversely affect metabolic recovery, but at the same time, you won’t benefit either.

So what to do? Answer: use a different approach. Stimulate different muscle fibers and in turn yield a different overall physiological response. For example, if your workout was Ladders on Monday you’d want 20:10 Fast and Furious on Wednesday, and you would want 40:20 Metabolic Madness on Friday, and then perhaps Pilates Fitcamp on Saturday all with a variety of intervals and resistance loads.

I mix up the workouts for you and gradually increase the load over each 5 week cycle. You choose the weight/resistance, how many days you train and MOST importantly – what you do on rest days. Just remember this programme isn’t about coasting through or pacing so you finish every interval.. I like to see you challenge yourself and fail sometimes….. Really Go For It!! Every Rep Every Round…

Option #3 – Go for a Brisk Walk. Follow the rest day exercises as part of this system, put your outdoor trainers on, get outside and walk (briskly) for at least 15 minutes on rest days. As you get fitter walk faster – so it will always fit into your lunch break!!

I’m NOT suggesting you get into steady state Cardio Training – we all know that doesn’t give measurable Fat Loss results

Option #4 Try a Yoga or Pilates Session. New campers benefit from a good deep stretch every week, so Yoga with me or at home. Pilates will accelerate your Core Strength progress and allow you to work harder in your other workouts.

Lastly, a quote from a great coach on the subject: “Your body will only increase recovery if you force it to work more frequently. Initially, you may still have residual soreness from the previous workout, but don’t worry. Instead, work through it and your body will improve its recovery rate to the point where soreness will subside.” We all want to increase recovery capacity, gain more muscle, increase strength, and lose more fat? So, forget about “sitting on the bench” because of a little soreness. If you’re a new camper – a LOT of soreness!!! Instead, get yourself back in the studio quickly with one of the above two methods. In return, you can expect a lot more progress with a lot less soreness.

So what about you?

Do you ever train a sore muscle?

Do you judge the effectiveness of your workouts by how sore you feel the next day?

I know I feel great when I can’t sit without yelping! Maybe that’s just me?

Let Me Know…… Jax Allen    080212 ©