3. Problems With DOMS

3. The Problem With Using Muscle Soreness As A Guide

Muscle soreness tells you if you’ve done more than you can handle.

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It tells you if you can handle a little bit more.

It tells you that you’ve recently done something new, different, or that your body wasn’t used to or even ready for.

But, it doesn’t really tell you how well or poorly you’ve performed. It may define quantity more than quality. So be careful there.

I hope you found these posts interesting. Informative and helpful.

Eat Clean. Train Hard. Feel Great

Jax.

Right and wrong exercise can have the same results.

Wrong exercise may not be good for you in the long run — causing pain, discomfort and injury — but in the short term it can still help you drop weight, shed fat, and build muscle.

In that regard, Biggest Loser works. Crossfit works. Zumba works.
Fit Camps work. Everything works.

And if it’s different enough, you’ll be sore.

Muscle soreness is welcomed sensory feedback.

Just remember, it’s a signal that your muscles are damaged and your performance is compromised. It also means — especially for the beginner — that you’ll be better off helping the healing process through recovery methods, as opposed to continually upping your workout intensity and pushing the envelope. That’s why my clients have rest days, rest intervals and De load sessions.

Muscle soreness is one way of judging your workout. It means something. It just doesn’t mean everything.

2 The Dark Side of DOMS!

2. The Darker Side Of Muscle Soreness

Yes, sore muscles can feel good. In more ways than one. It’s sensory validation of a hard-fought workout.

A pat on the back, if you will.

But do you want to be sore all of the time? I know I don’t !!

Muscle soreness has been shown to be associated with decreased strength, power, range of motion and neuromuscular function.

Ultimately, that constant soreness will have a negative effect on your performance.

If you’re not careful, and push yourself too far too fast, or for too long, you can cross the threshold of Rhabdomyolosis.

If you follow the Crossfit debates, may be familiar with the term.

Rhabdomyolosis occurs when you’ve damaged the muscle tissue to such an extent that it breaks down completely.
Not a good thing.

However, that’s the extreme end of things. And ground only walked by an irresponsible coach and uninformed trainee. Since you’re reading my blog, you don’t fall into either of these camps.
So no worries.

More next time….

1. Why Are Your Muscles Sore?

1. Why Your Muscles Are Sore After A Workout

Muscle soreness occurs when you do something different.

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And by different, I mean anything outside your norm.

That could be ANYTHING.

1. Performing an exercise you’re not used to.
2. Performing an exercise you’re used to, but at a depth and speed you’re not — slower or faster for example.
3.Performing for a duration you’re not used to — more continuous time, less rest, etc.
4.Performing a volume you’re not used to — more weight, more reps, etc.
5.Performing an exercise with more restrictions — improving or degrading your alignment, for example.
Change a single variable in a common equation and you just might be sore the next day.

Technically, it’s called delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS for short). And it’s thought to be a result of microscopic tearing of the muscle fibers.

The amount of tearing — and soreness — depends on how hard and how long you exercise. As well as what type of exercise you do.

And yet, muscle soreness is often seen as a sign of doing things right.

Those jelly-legs you feel when attempting to go up or down stairs signal the onset of an adaptation process, which is helping you to grow stronger and improve endurance.

“If I can feel the soreness in the muscle, it means it’s working and I’m on the right path. If I can’t feel it, then I must be doing something wrong.”

It’s not quite that simple – more next time ….

Four Signs You’re Working Too Hard

Four Signs You’re Working Too Hard

1.) Diminished Training Intensity:
In general, if you need to reduce your training loads from set to set, then you’re probably working too hard. Your goal is to be able to use the sames loads at the end of the workout that you used in the beginning without excessively resting before increasing the loads in the subsequent workout. The only exception here is if the workout actually calls for you to reduce your loads throughout the training session. In addition, it’s better to go into a given work period with a general rep range to work within. For example, if you were using 30-second work periods, a typical rep range within that time frame is 8-12 reps if you’re moving at the typical 3-4 second per rep tempo. If you’re getting more than 15 reps, the loads are too light. If you’re getting less than 6 reps, the loads are too heavy.

2.) Excessive Resting:
If you are being forced to rest/pause a couple times during a work period, or you’re resting longer than your rest periods allow for, you’re probably working too hard. If you choose the appropriate exercise intensity, you should be able to train with minimal if any stopping during the work periods within your workout. As the workout progresses, a brief 3-5 second pause here and there to reset and reload is fine, but if you’re taking any longer than that and stopping constantly, then you need to reduce your loads or regress the exercise appropriately.

3.) Excessive Breathing: A good workout will have you breathing hard as your body’s demand for oxygen increases, but you should never be completely out of breath or gasping for air. If you start wheezing or coughing, that’s a clear sign to stop exercising immediately. If symptoms persist, it could be related to exercise-induced asthma or another serious condition and you should seek immediate medical attention. It’s important to note that larger individuals with more muscle mass will have greater overall oxygen demands and will thus be more prone to being out of breath than their smaller, less muscled counterparts.

4.) Dizziness or Blurred Vision: If you get dizzy or have vision trouble during any portion of exercise, then you’re probably working too hard. Either that or you could be experiencing a migraine or vertigo or have symptoms of low blood pressure, dehydration, or lack of nutrition. If this conditions persists, you must immediately discontinue your fitness program and seek medical attention.