Why You Should Eat Eggs EVERYDAY, Yes Everyday….

The simple egg is a neat nutritional powerhouse that has been called ‘nature’s multivitamin’ because they’re packed with antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and healthy fats, and it’s all stored in one very convenient package. Here are five reasons why you should be eating more eggs.

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They help you stay slim
Eggs are very high in protein meaning that they help you stay full for longer. A study in the International Journal of Obesity revealed that overweight adults who ate two eggs for breakfast went on to eat fewer calories throughout the day, compared to those who ate the same amount of calories in bagels. Eating eggs for breakfast will ward off those hunger pangs until it’s time for lunch.

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They’re nutritional sunshine
Vitamin D is vital for all of us and has many benefits including cancer prevention, developing healthy bones and even improving your mood. We tend to rely on the sunshine for vitamin D, but the UK weather means that 50% of us sun-starved island dwellers could be deficient. Eggs are one of the only food sources of vitamin D, making them nutritional sunshine.

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They make you beautiful
Eggs are packed with keratin, a protein that makes up 70% of your hair, and is vital for the growth and repair of every cell in your body. Keratin helps your hair and nails grow strong and healthy, and helps to keep you looking young and beautiful. You don’t just have to eat your eggs to benefit either – putting egg directly onto your hair can help repair and condition it.

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They’re good brain food
As we age, our brains start to shrink which is a phenomenon known as brain atrophy and can be a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease. Eggs are full of vitamin B12 and lecithin, which can fight brain atrophy. The yolk is full of choline, a nutrient that makes acetylcholine, a messenger that communicates between the brains and the nerves, and is also great for your memory.

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They’re incredibly versatile
Selenium, folate, pantothenic acid, vitamins B12, A, E and D, iodine, phosphorous, iron, thiamine, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin: this list of good stuff in eggs is almost endless, as is the variety of ways to cook them. Whether they’re boiled, poached, fried, scrambled, steamed, baked, in an omelette, in a quiche or you’re brave enough to eat them raw, eggs are perfect at any time of the day. Our favourite tip is to keep a few hard-boiled eggs in the fridge – perfect post-workout or when you need an emergency snack.

Eat Clean. Live Well. Feel Great.

Jax

#3 Clean Eating But How? – Lean Protein

Lean Protein

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Lean proteins are low in fat, calories, cholesterol and are great diet foods that are also clean. Most often, people who eat clean food purchase naturally fed and organic animal proteins to avoid added chemicals and growth hormones. For leaner options, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute suggests trying turkey and chicken instead of beef, egg whites instead of a whole egg, beans and fish fillets.

Workout Nutrition Myth! – Eggs

Workout Nutrition Myth!
Ditch Egg Yolks
Egg whites, alone, are a terrible choice due to their low fat and lack of vitamins.
The yolk, which is tastier part of the egg, has all the vitamins and half the protein.
Eating just whites is bad for your health as a lack of fat soluble vitamins wo effect your immune system, recovery potential, will spike your insulin and energy swings throughout the day. The EXACT opposite aim of post w’out nutrition.
Go for Whole Egg. Snack on Boiled Eggs!
Eat Clean – Train Heavy – Feel Great.

#1 Lies That Keep You Fat and Sick!

1. Eggs Are Bad For Your Health

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Eggs are so incredibly nutritious that they’re often called “nature’s multivitamin.”

The nutrients in them are enough to turn a single cell into an entire baby chicken.

However, eggs have been demonized in the past because they contain a large amount of cholesterol, which was believed to increase the risk of heart disease.

But the truth is that despite being high in cholesterol, eggs don’t really raise the bad cholesterol in the blood. In fact, eggs primarily raise the “good” cholesterol (1, 2, 3, 4).

Despite all the warnings about eggs in the past few decades, studies show that they are NOT associated with heart disease (5, 6, 7).

If anything, eggs are pretty much a perfect food for humans. They’re loaded with protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals and unique antioxidants that protect the eyes (8, 9).

They are also an excellent source of Choline, a nutrient that is very important for the health of the brain and about 90% of people aren’t getting enough of (10, 11).

Despite being a “high fat” food, eating eggs for breakfast is proven to cause significant weight loss compared to a breakfast of bagels (12, 13).

Bottom Line: Eggs are among the most nutritious foods on the planet and do not raise your risk of heart disease. Eggs for breakfast will help you lose weight.

References can be found at http://www.jaxallenfitness.com

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Find your egg cups, non stick omelette pan, learn how to make a range of frittata and scramble up a healthy breakfast every day.

Like this post, please follow my blog. Thanks Jax

Studies on Eggs – references 1-4 in posts. Read more link.

Reference study 1
Metabolism. 2013 Mar;62(3):400-10. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2012.08.014. Epub 2012 Sep 27.
Whole egg consumption improves lipoprotein profiles and insulin sensitivity to a greater extent than yolk-free egg substitute in individuals with metabolic syndrome.
Blesso CN, Andersen CJ, Barona J, Volek JS, Fernandez ML.
Source
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
We investigated if daily egg feeding, along with carbohydrate restriction, would alter lipoprotein metabolism and influence atherogenic lipoprotein profiles and insulin resistance in men and women with metabolic syndrome (MetS).
METHODS:
In a randomized, single-blind, parallel design, participants consumed either 3 whole eggs/day (EGG, n=20) or the equivalent amount of yolk-free egg substitute (SUB, n=17), as part of a moderately carbohydrate-restricted diet (25%-30% energy) for 12 weeks. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apos), oxidized LDL (oxLDL), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities were assessed at baseline and week 12. Lipoprotein particle concentrations and sizes were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
RESULTS:
Atherogenic dyslipidemia improved for all individuals as evidenced by reductions in plasma triglycerides, apoC-III, apoE, oxLDL, VLDL particle diameter, large VDL, total IDL, small LDL, and medium LDL particles (P<0.05). Furthermore, there were increases in HDL-cholesterol, large LDL and large HDL particles (P<0.05) for all individuals. However, there were greater increases in HDL-cholesterol and large HDL particles, and reductions in total VLDL and medium VLDL particles for those consuming EGG compared to SUB (P<0.05). Plasma insulin and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were reduced, while LCAT activity, and both HDL and LDL diameters increased over time in the EGG group only (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:
Incorporating daily whole egg intake into a moderately carbohydrate-restricted diet provides further improvements in the atherogenic lipoprotein profile and in insulin resistance in individuals with MetS.

Reference Study 2
Dietary Cholesterol from Eggs Increases Plasma HDL Cholesterol in Overweight Men Consuming a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet1,2
Gisella Mutungi3, Joseph Ratliff3, Michael Puglisi3, Moises Torres-Gonzalez3, Ushma Vaishnav3, Jose O. Leite3, Erin Quann4, Jeff S. Volek4, and Maria Luz Fernandez3,*
+ Author Affiliations

3Department of Nutritional Sciences and 4Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269
↵*To whom correspondence should be addressed.
E-mail: maria-luz.fernandez@uconn.edu.

Abstract

Carbohydrate-restricted diets (CRD) significantly decrease body weight and independently improve plasma triglycerides (TG) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Increasing intake of dietary cholesterol from eggs in the context of a low-fat diet maintains the LDL cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL-C for both hyper- and hypo-responders to dietary cholesterol. In this study, 28 overweight/obese male subjects (BMI = 25–37 kg/m2) aged 40–70 y were recruited to evaluate the contribution of dietary cholesterol from eggs in a CRD. Subjects were counseled to consume a CRD (10–15% energy from carbohydrate) and they were randomly allocated to the EGG group [intake of 3 eggs per day (640 mg/d additional dietary cholesterol)] or SUB group [equivalent amount of egg substitute (0 dietary cholesterol) per day]. Energy intake decreased in both groups from 10,243 ± 4040 to 7968 ± 2401 kJ (P < 0.05) compared with baseline. All subjects irrespective of their assigned group had reduced body weight and waist circumference (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the plasma TG concentration was reduced from 1.34 ± 0.66 to 0.83 ± 0.30 mmol/L after 12 wk (P < 0.001) in all subjects. The plasma LDL-C concentration, as well as the LDL-C:HDL-C ratio, did not change during the intervention. In contrast, plasma HDL-C concentration increased in the EGG group from 1.23 ± 0.39 to 1.47 ± 0.38 mmol/L (P < 0.01), whereas HDL-C did not change in the SUB group. Plasma glucose concentrations in fasting subjects did not change. Eighteen subjects were classified as having the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at the beginning of the study, whereas 3 subjects had that classification at the end. These results suggest that including eggs in a CRD results in increased HDL-C while decreasing the risk factors associated with MetS.

Manuscript received: August 7, 2007.
Initial review completed: September 26, 2007.
Revision accepted: November 14, 2007.

Reference Study 3
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2006 Jan;9(1):8-12.
Dietary cholesterol provided by eggs and plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations.
Fernandez ML.
Source
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. maria-luz.fernandez@uconn.edu
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
Extensive research has not clearly established a link between egg consumption and risk for coronary heart disease. The effects of egg intake on plasma lipids and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) atherogenicity in healthy populations need to be addressed.
RECENT FINDINGS:
The lack of connection between heart disease and egg intake could partially be explained by the fact that dietary cholesterol increases the concentrations of both circulating LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in those individuals who experience an increase in plasma cholesterol following egg consumption (hyperresponders). It is also important to note that 70% of the population experiences a mild increase or no alterations in plasma cholesterol concentrations when challenged with high amounts of dietary cholesterol (hyporesponders). Egg intake has been shown to promote the formation of large LDL, in addition to shifting individuals from the LDL pattern B to pattern A, which is less atherogenic. Eggs are also good sources of antioxidants known to protect the eye; therefore, increased plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in individuals consuming eggs are also of interest, especially in those populations susceptible to developing macular degeneration and eye cataracts.
SUMMARY:
For these reasons, dietary recommendations aimed at restricting egg consumption should not be generalized to include all individuals. We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but, in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet.

Reference Study 4
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2006 Jan;9(1):8-12.
Dietary cholesterol provided by eggs and plasma lipoproteins in healthy populations.
Fernandez ML.
Source
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. maria-luz.fernandez@uconn.edu
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
Extensive research has not clearly established a link between egg consumption and risk for coronary heart disease. The effects of egg intake on plasma lipids and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) atherogenicity in healthy populations need to be addressed.
RECENT FINDINGS:
The lack of connection between heart disease and egg intake could partially be explained by the fact that dietary cholesterol increases the concentrations of both circulating LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in those individuals who experience an increase in plasma cholesterol following egg consumption (hyperresponders). It is also important to note that 70% of the population experiences a mild increase or no alterations in plasma cholesterol concentrations when challenged with high amounts of dietary cholesterol (hyporesponders). Egg intake has been shown to promote the formation of large LDL, in addition to shifting individuals from the LDL pattern B to pattern A, which is less atherogenic. Eggs are also good sources of antioxidants known to protect the eye; therefore, increased plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin in individuals consuming eggs are also of interest, especially in those populations susceptible to developing macular degeneration and eye cataracts.
SUMMARY:
For these reasons, dietary recommendations aimed at restricting egg consumption should not be generalized to include all individuals. We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but, in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet.

Read more: http://authoritynutrition.com/top-13-nutrition-lies-that-made-the-world-sick-and-fat/#ixzz2jLBcoPyk

#3 Nutrition Myth: Egg Yolks are Cholesterol Bombs

here`s another myth busting piece

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#3 Myth: You Should Ditch Egg Yolks
Egg whites are really a terrible workout meal due to their low fat and lack of vitamins. The yolk- which is the tastiest part of the egg, anyway- has all the vitamins and half the protein. Eating just the egg whites is an absolutely terrible idea for your health, since it’s lack of fat tends to cause insulin spikes and energy swings throughout the day.

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I`ve heard clients saying they won`t`t eat egg yolks because they still follow the guidancetheywere given back in the90`s.
Back then Heart Patients were told not to eat more than 2 eggs each week!

Since then many studies have disproved the link between cholesterol eaten in food and high blood cholesterol levels.

If you are unlucky enough to have a body that produces lots of `bad` cholesterol you can expect to influence your numbers by about 25%. If your numbers are high, your health practitioner will refer you for drug treatment – statins of some kind (that`s another blog post in itself)

Given popular breakfast choices – so called `HEALTHY CEREALS` which are really justpudding for breakfast – high sugar, little nutrient, high carb, milky puddings! But they are packaged and re-packaged to be convenient. Look at the range of breakfast biscuits on the shelves. SHOCKING

So, what about workout meals?
If we`re talking post workout nutrition – the current thinking is to eat within 30-90 minutes of a workout. To take in about 25g of protein with 50g of carbs. So eggs whole and split can play there part.
i love an egg and veggy scramble/frittata affair – fast and easy. never boring due to the range of veggies you can add – use last night`s leftover cooked veg.
make a really big one – have half for breakfast and the remainder for lunch?

My message – eat MORE EGGS – Free range of course.
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What they NEVER Told You About Eggs

What They NEVER Told You About Eggs

By Cassandra Forsythe-Pribanic, PhD, RD

The Egg: this three letter word invokes almost as much fear into the hearts of Americans as our other favorite “deadly” three-letter word: F-A-T.

However, it’s finally time to crack the misconception that eggs are bad for our health, because they’re absolutely not.
It’s unfortunate, but many people still think that you cannot eat more than one egg per day, or even more than 3 eggs per week because if you do, you’ll develop high blood cholesterol levels and fatty arteries. But, this could not be farther from the truth.

So, why do we think this way?

In the 1960’s consumers were first “warned” about eggs as being a major player in the development of heart disease… without any conclusive evidence to back up this claim. News articles overwhelmingly focused on the egg- cholesterol – heart disease link when there was no real proof for this message.

Eggs were so demonized that egg substitute products became all the rage for cooking and baking, but they were no better, and sometimes far worse, than the whole egg itself.

Today, consumers need to understand that eggs are not evil, but in fact are healthy and important components of our diets.

High Protein Quality

First and foremost, eggs an inexpensive source of high quality protein that almost everyone can enjoy in various ways – from scrambled eggs to deviled eggs to green eggs and ham, eggs are a versatile way to quickly and easily get more protein in your diet. And, they’re not just for breakfast, but for lunch and dinner too!

In terms of protein quality, most foods rich in protein are measured in terms of the availability of that protein to effectively promote growth (cell growth), and this term is known as biological value.

Based on the amino acids contained in an egg and its ability to stimulate growth, egg protein is only second to mother’s milk for human nutrition.

On a scale, with 100 representing top efficiency, these are the biological values of proteins in several foods:

Whole Egg

94

Milk

85

Fish

76

Beef

74

Soybeans

73

Beans, dry

58

Biological Value of Protein Foods

Nutrition Powerhouses

Secondly, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition:

• Eggs are among the few sources of naturally occurring vitamin D and K, which are known for cancer protection and longevity.

• Eggs contain the highest source of dietary choline (125mg/egg), which is a nutrient necessary for proper nervous system development and structural integrity of cell membranes; particularly, choline is necessary for brain development in infants to impart lifelong enhancement of memory and attention.

• They supply 6.3grams of high quality protein, 5 grams of fat primarily consisting of an even balance of saturates and monounsaturates, with less polyunsaturates, and barely no carbohydrates at all; they’re the perfect low carbohydrate food.

• Some designer eggs contain up to 200 mg of DHA, the essential omega-3 fatty acid needed by all humans for normal development and functioning, and prevention of depression and memory loss.

• The whole egg contains 166 mcg of lutein and zeaxanthin, two super antioxidants that contribute to eye health and prevent common causes of age-related blindness; research shows that the bioavailability of these nutrients from eggs is higher than other foods with higher contents.

Eggs Do NOT Cause Heart Disease

In November 2010, a paper was published by Canadian medical researchers entitled, “Dietary cholesterol and egg yolks: not for patients at risk of vascular disease”.

The authors stated that: “Patients at risk of cardiovascular disease should limit their intake of cholesterol. Stopping the consumption of egg yolks after a stroke or myocardial infarction would be like quitting smoking after a diagnosis of lung cancer: a necessary action, but late.”

However, prior to this paper, over the past 10 years, numerous studies, both clinical and observational, were published with the findings that there is no connection between egg consumption and heart disease risk, especially in healthy individuals.

For example, Dr Maria-Luz Fernandez and colleagues have been investigating egg nutritional health for more than a decade and have published findings such as:

• “Revisiting Dietary Cholesterol Recommendations: Does the Evidence Support a Limit of 300 mg/d?”. Overall, no study has yet shown an association between egg intake and risk for heart disease and there is no compelling epidemiological or clinical trial results that show compelling evidence for limiting cholesterol intake to 300 mg/day or restricting egg consumption.

• “Dietary Cholesterol from Eggs Increases Plasma HDL Cholesterol in Overweight Men Consuming a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet”. Raising HDL cholesterol is often called impossible, but is necessary to protect against plaque build-up in your arteries (HDL carries it away). This study shows that it can be easily increased in overweight men (a population very susceptible to heart disease) by reducing carb intake and using eggs in the diet regularly.

• ‘Pre-menopausal women, classified as hypo- or hyper-responders, do not alter their LDL/HDL ratio following a high dietary cholesterol challenge”. When 50 pre-menopausal women (another very susceptible heart disease population) were given either an egg a day plus cholesterol from other foods, or a cholesterol-free egg substitute for 30 days, did not experience the development of an ‘atherogenic lipoprotein profile” regardless if they were hyper or hypo-responders to dietary cholesterol.

Overall, dietary cholesterol from eggs does NOT cause heart disease, rather a lifestyle and a diet high in foods that elicit increased inflammation, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress induces increased atherosclerotic build-up and increased risk for heart attack or stroke (among other diseases).

As such, it is wise to follow a diet low in sugar, void of processed foods, artificial chemicals (flavors and colors), preservatives and pesticides and avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and replace it with a whole foods, natural, plant-rich diet balanced in protein, carbohydrates and fat to minimize heart disease risk.

Avoiding eggs is not the answer – in fact, including eggs in your wholesome diet will actually benefit you more . Two eggs provide 13 grams of protein, ~10 grams of fat, and plenty of nutrients you barely find in any other foods. This will keep you satisfied, healthy and energized for hours after any meal and will help you choose other healthy foods at the right times.

However, If you choose not to live a healthy lifestyle with whole foods, adequate sleep, plenty of exercise and minimal toxins, and/or you already have heart disease, you may be advised to limit your intake of egg yolks because it may acerbate your current situation.