Workout BEFORE Breakfast?!!

While the benefits of exercises are known to everyone, many tend to give the morning fitness regime a miss due to the heavy work schedule or late-nights. However, morning workouts have more benefits than any other workout during the day — from controlling weight, enhancing mood and keeping you fit and healthy. Did you know it also helps you find your inner creativity?


Whether it is in just writing an article, painting a canvas or churning out ideas for your office meeting; physical activity activates the creative juices and once they start flowing, there is nothing to stop you.You start to look at things positively and feel refreshed and energised to start a new day at the end of a morning workout. To get that much-needed creative boost, set up a regular exercise schedule and see the difference

Once you take a decision to start, stick to it and ensure you get a good night’s sleep.

We exercise Monday to Friday at 06:15 and we’re ready for the day by 07:00. 

Saturday’s we meet at 08:15, every session is different – no boredom with our workouts! 

No 12 week repeating workouts that your body adapts to within just a few classes, your brain goes automatic and you find yourself daydreaming when you should be engaged, working so hard you just about complete each interval. 

If you’re really lucky you’ll work till you fail! That’s when you get fabulous results, not when you coast through as an invisible part of a big group. 

Next time you decide to do something about your fitness and you really mean it – come and join one of our pre- breakfast Fatloss Fitcamps – group Personal Training as its best. Personal attention in a small group – every repetition coached to perfection, every exercise adapted for best results. 

We look forward to seeing you before breakfast soon

Book NOW by text 07831 680086

Or email me : jaxallenfitness@gmail.com

Visit my website : http://www.jaxallenfitness.com

Train Smart.  Eat Clean. Expect Results 

Jax 

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Which Trainers? Running, trail, gym….

We had an interesting little chat in Fitcamp the other morning and few of the gang were talking about changing their trainers. Various reasons and suggestions were put forward – I thought this info graphic would go somewhat to help the decision making process. 
For years now I have worn and recommended New Balance Minimus Vibram trail shoes. They are light weight, very flexible almost flat for a barefoot style and take the stresses of the multi directional training included in my sessions. 

I first swapped after attending a seminar on barefoot running – although I NEVER run – it was an interesting talk and very persuasive. The main takeaway was that high heels hurt your knees and back! What a surprise – we girls have known this for ever – but trainer makers never related that to sports shoe design.  

So here’s bit of history (science) to persuade you too. My occasional knee niggle is long gone, the impact work we do doesn’t present any problem even tho my shoes have very little traditional support. 


Next time you’re thinking of buying new training shoes, consider what you want to do, what you want to achieve. If you are with us and not planning on spending hours on useless cardio machines, intend on mixing your strength and cardio training into,super effective metabolic conditioning sessions you’ll need a flexible, supportive low profile shoe with good grip and adjustable fit. 

To squat you need a flat foot position, to keep your feet healthy you need to ‘feel’ the floor and you need to be able to wash and wear your trainers. These current designs all allow sweat to wick away and cooling mesh panels reduce heat. Many are treated to prevent bacteria too! Here are a few pictures of what I think you should look for


This is very similar to the shoe I use. I searched online for ‘Sports Shoes Direct’ they have good sales – especially once you know your size. These are NOT cheap shoes – but I wear them everyday and they last very well.  Old style shoes with thick soles break down inside – you think you’ve got a supportive shoe but the cushioning structures have crumbled tipping you even further forward than before.

Other makers to look at are Merrel and Sketchers. Sadly, I don’t really like shoes that I’ve seen from Nike and Adidas – they are still built on a wedge sole, even tho’ much lower than in the past, and usually have an unstructured upper that stretches and warps when under strain of multi-directional training. 

I’ve recently done two Active ageing and Functional ageing training courses, the take home from both was that we need to spend time barefoot or as close to it everyday. To keep muscles working and responsive but also to stimulate the feedback mechanisms in our feet – soles, toes and heels. The ‘use it or lose it’ rule applies to this aspect of fitness too.  

I believe you will move better as a result of more feedback from your feet, your muscles will absorb impact rather than your joints and you’ll have less hard skin and callouses too!  These shoes even come in width fittings – so no more bursting out the sides of your running shoes when you train laterally or blisters from your narrow feet moving inside a wide shoe. 

Remember as a species we’ve been moving for thousands of years, no-one needs to run for miles and miles to be healthy and fit. If running is your sport – that’s your choice. But to get the best fitness bang for your buck (time) you’ll be cutting down pure cardio, increasing resistance training and hopefully combining the two, so an adaptable shoe is essential. 

Let me know how you get on.

Jax 

Consistency is Key! 

Don’t Cheat a Diet
I’m not sure how many times I’ve written or read this, but it’s true. The dietary system or nutritional framework that you choose to employ is far less relevant than your level of compliance within it. The reality is that most nutritional approaches have very similar principles, the overriding one perhaps being that you need to eat within your calorie requirements, being in a deficit if your goal is weight loss.
Fitness Truths: the three reasons you’re not burning fat

  
Is this really what you had for breakfast?

Most systems will assume that most of what you consume comes from decent sources, with the key messages being to drink more water, eat your vegetables and get enough protein. Regardless of what you choose, the bottom line is that you’ve actually got to do it, consistently.
Don’t Skip a Workout

  
Cheating on the gym is the same as cheating on your diet: it doesn’t work. Again, most approaches and systems will share common underpinning principles, such as prioritising resistance training for example, so what you choose to do is far less important than you actually doing it consistently.
The simple way to think of nutrition and exercise when it comes to changing your body shape and composition, is that your diet will look after fat loss, while your training or exercise will look after your muscle mass – think toning – and cardiovascular health. Both are important. 
The bottom line is that you need to turn up three times per week, focus your mind on the task at hand, and give it a good go.
Do Invisible Training

  
Invisible training is a term I borrowed from a well-known coach in professional sports, which refers to various recovery and regeneration strategies, or the things that we do outside of the gym that often go unseen. 
Fitness Truths: three reasons you’re not burning fat

I use the term in general fitness circles to describe the exercise or movement that we do outside of our structured workouts – that is, activity that keeps the systems ticking and burns additional calories. Things such as walking to work, taking the dog out, playing tag with the kids, taking the stairs, swimming a few lengths on holiday, and all of the other things that you do not record or perhaps think of as exercise, but are actually equally, if not more important than, your scheduled sessions.
 Written by -Claude Vacassin is founder of W10 Performance,

Eat Yourself Fitter!

How to Eat Yourself Fitter 
Okay, so today’s tip is all about protecting your immune system so you can perform at your best all year round. 
The key is, quite simply, what you eat… especially AFTER you’re been doing exercise. 
Truth is, you can follow all the fancy training programmes you want, but if you’re laid up with coughs and colds each winter, you’re never going to reap the rewards of all that hard work. 
So you need to ensure your body gets enough of those nutrients that support your immune system, including: 
• Vitamin A – well supplied in liver, eggs, all orange and red fruits and vegetables such as carrots, sweet potatoes, apricots. 
• Vitamin C – found in citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruits, kiwis, all the berries, also well supplied in tomatoes and peppers. 
• Vitamin D – good sources include eggs, milk, butter, cod liver oil and some other fish oils. 
• Essential fatty acids (i.e. omega-3 and omega-6 oils) – good sources include all the fatty fish (trout, sardines, herrings, salmon, mackerel, pilchards, etc.) as well as unrefined whole grains and nuts and seeds, especially, hemp, flax, walnuts and pumpkin seeds. 
• Zinc – a vital immune nutrient; good sources are high quality, lean cuts of meat and fish and shellfish; also found in whole grains and some nuts and seeds, such as walnuts and pumpkin seeds. 
• Selenium – well supplied in unrefined whole grains (eg wholemeal bread), all seafood and some nuts and seeds, especially Brazil nuts. 
But as well as the above, you need to consider a post-exercise nutritional strategy. 
That info comes next! …..

Eat Well. Train Hard. Expect Results! 

Jax 

Exercise Could Slow The Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise Could Slow The Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

An article From The Real Diabetes Truth
admin | November 20, 2014 | Comments (0)

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Running around outside in the open air seems like a natural thing for children to do. And recent scientific findings suggest that exercise and sunshine could have some previously unknown health benefits. Scientists at the University of Birmingham Medical School tell us that exercise can have a protective effect on the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas and could help to prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in both children and adults. Meanwhile, on the other side of the globe, researchers in Perth, Australia have found that ultraviolet rays might boost metabolism in a way that prevents weight gain.

In the mid-20th century, children still ‘went out to play’. Play was active, often energetic and mostly outdoors. Then, in the wake of a few tragic cases of child abduction, parents started to worry whether unsupervised outdoor play was safe. Not long after, the first computerised games appeared. Then there were the dire warnings about sun exposure and skin cancer. As a result, for today’s children, ‘play’ often means sitting indoors with an electronic gadget. In parallel with this decline in physical activity, there has been a relentless rise in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes; and it seems that this could be more than coincidental.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin. As a result, beta cell function is reduced but may still be around 50 per cent of normal when type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. And studies have shown that beta cells may not be permanently killed off and could be capable of regeneration under the right conditions. As I mentioned here, around three-quarters of people with type 1 diabetes still have some functioning beta-cells.

Exercise appears to have a beneficial impact on the beta cells in several different ways, by altering levels of various hormones, glucose and fats in the blood and by affecting inflammatory substances and immune system activity. In an article published recently in the journal Diabetologia, the University of Birmingham researchers review the evidence that exercise promotes beta cell proliferation, reduces beta cell death and could help to preserve beta cell function in diabetic patients.1 The evidence for this is now so strong that the authors call for clinical trials to determine the type, intensity and duration of exercise that has the greatest benefit. The idea that something as simple as exercise could have a huge effect on the global epidemic of diabetes may not please the pharmaceutical companies but it make a lot of sense to me.

Sunshine – it’s not just about vitamin D

The Australian research found that exposing overfed mice to ultraviolet (UV) light slowed their weight gain.2 Not only that – it also suppressed the development of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and reduced blood levels of glucose, insulin and cholesterol. Although previous studies have associated vitamin D, which is manufactured in the skin when it is exposed to UV light, with weight loss, vitamin D was not the hero of this story. Instead, the researchers found that increased levels of nitric oxide resulting from UV exposure were responsible for the improvements seen. Nitric oxide is known to reduce blood pressure and benefit the heart and blood vessels, but it also regulates the body’s basic metabolic rate and the burning of glucose and fats for energy.

The results of this study need to be interpreted cautiously, since mice are nocturnal animals covered in fur, so their skin isn’t normally exposed to UV light. However, it does suggest that the nitric oxide produced in our skin by sunshine, in addition to the vitamin D, could have important health benefits for people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome.

At this time of year, the sunshine may not be strong enough in the UK to produce much vitamin D, but you could still benefit from some nitric oxide production. Getting outside on fine days and exercising in the fresh air – whether it’s a run, walk, cycle ride or a kick-about with a football – can do you a power of good in other ways, too. To remind yourself of the many benefits of exercise, see my earlier post here.

While exercise and sunshine are free for everyone, Big Pharma would prefer you to take its patented drugs. The latest one to get approval is called Trulicity – an innocent and appealing name for a particularly dangerous medication that could cause thyroid cancer and other tumours. In my next blog post I shall explain why Trulicity is truly one you should avoid.

Wishing you the best of health,

Martin Hum
PhD DHD Nutritionist
for Real Diabetes Truth

Bear in mind we are not addressing anyone’s personal situation and you should rely on this for informational purposes only. Please consult with your own physician before acting on any recommendations contained herein.

References
1. Narendran P, Solomon TP, Kennedy A, Chimen M, Andrews RC. The time has come to test the beta cell preserving effects of exercise in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia. 2014 Nov 4 (Online ahead of print).

2. Geldenhuys S, Hart PH, Endersby R, Jacoby P, Feelisch M, Weller RB, Matthews V, Gorman S. Ultraviolet radiation suppresses obesity and symptoms of metabolic syndrome independently of vitamin D in mice fed a high-fat diet. Diabetes. 2014; 63(11):3759-3769.

Are so-called sports drinks making you fat?

Are so-called sports drinks making you fat?

Carb-dense sports drinks are an increasingly common sight in the gym – but are they doing you more harm than good, asks Ross Edgley
(Article from Men’s Health – it’s a good one)

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This is why I don’t tell my clients to use pre- exercise drinks or post exercise sugary sports drinks… Just a recovery carb and protein shake or meal in the magic recovery window for best fat lost and recovery results.

Sports drinks are the liquid of choice for elite athletes. We see them in perfectly polished adverts, sipping from their ‘bottled fitness’, and treat their lean physiques as beacons of inspiration for us average gym dwellers.
So on what grounds are researchers from Harvard Medical School claiming that the exact same drinks are responsible for making people fat? It seems almost contradictory: surely sports drinks don’t make you put on the pounds?

The answer lies in a category error. Carbohydrate-dense sports drink formulas were originally created to fuel the hours of intense training professional athletes subject themselves to. We’re talking about regular and sustained exertion – and not a 40-minute spin on the treadmill designed to burn off the weekend’s indulgences.

But advertising is a powerful thing, and as we’ve increasingly turned to the gym to counteract our sedentary lifestyles, so too have we collided the idea of fitness success with sports drinks and those pictures of professional athletes. Lucozade Sport and Powerade may be intended for elite athletes, but they’re now frequently seen next to the treadmill at the office gym.

Should your gym bag contain a sports drink or not? Put simply, if you’re training for Olympic Gold, then yes. But if you’re sole aim is to lose the fat accumulated in daily life, the answer, according to research published in the American Journal of Applied Physiology, is an emphatic no.
Related Articles

Jax.

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Sports drinks are typically high in carbohydrates, so they provide athletes with an efficient source of energy. The problem for those looking to lose the blubber is that carbs cause a rise in the hormone known as insulin, which limits the rate at which you burn fat.
To test this theory, researchers from the University of Texas monitored the impact that ingesting carbohydrates had on people’s ability to burn fat during exercise. They took six healthy, active men and had them complete 60 minutes of cycling in a fasted state — waking up and training without breakfast — and one hour after ingesting 0.8g of carbohydrates per kilogram of body weight. The results were conclusive: “Small elevations in plasma insulin before exercise suppress lipolysis (fat loss) during exercise to the point at which it equals and appears to limit fat oxidation (burning fat).”

The Texas study isn’t the only research to suggest that carbs plus exercise don’t equal fat loss. Scientists from the Department of Human Biology at the University of Limburg in the Netherlands similarly found that carbohydrates interfere with the body’s process for burning fat.

They support the idea that forgoing a pre-workout sports drink gives your body a hormonal fat burning advantage.

But the bad news doesn’t stop there. As well as hindering your efforts in the gym, sports drinks can also make you more prone to storing fat. That’s according to researchers from the Department of Food and Nutrition at Purdue University, who discovered liquid carbohydrates add more calories to the diet because they have a lower satiating effect compared to solid foods. Essentially, people are naively drinking litres of this ‘liquid fitness’ without accounting for the additional carbohydrates and calories in their regular diet.

Now, at this point it’s worth making it clear that sports drinks aren’t the devil’s water – far from it, as long as you’re interested in performance. Nutrition for performance is very different to nutrition for fat loss, and carb-heavy drinks can help fuel endurance efforts, allowing the body to go harder for longer

Just ask scientists from Loughborough University, who wanted to measure the impact a carbohydrate sports drink has on running performance. They took seven experienced endurance runners and had them complete two 30km road races, once with a 250ml sports drink and once with tap water. After monitoring blood lactate and other biological markers they concluded: “Performance time for a 30km road race is improved after ingesting a 5pc carbohydrate solution.”
Sports drinks also aid strength and power athletes who want to shift iron in the gym. Researchers from the University of Queensland subjected athletes to a two-day carbohydrate restricted diet to see if it had an impact on strength. What they found was a carbohydrate restriction program caused a “significant reduction in the number of squat repetitions performed.” Put simply, limiting your carbs in the kitchen can also limit your performance in the weights room.

And what about the guy who hits the treadmill for 40 minutes on Monday morning and then hangs his shoes up for the rest of the week? Well, the research suggests that sports drinks shouldn’t be on his banned substance list – as long as they’re consumed after the run. Scientists have found that consuming carbohydrates in the first 30 to 60 minutes after training can help replenish muscle glycogen and kick-start the entire recovery process. In its post-exercise state, the body effectively becomes a sponge, soaking up all the carbs you have earned on the treadmill and putting them to good use by sending them to the muscles to aid recovery.

All things considered, sports drinks are great if you’re an athlete and know how to use them properly.

But if your goal is to lose fat then don’t be fooled by the glossy, inspirational adverts which come complete with a professional athlete and his washboard abs.

Instead ditch the energy-rich sports drink until at least after the gym and visit the water fountain instead.

http://www.jaxallenfitness.com

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Live Like A Puppy – Feel Great

From a fitness instructor and educator I admire.
She has a fabulous sense of humour and explains how to eat, live and be healthy here …

By Jenny Burrell BSc (Hons), Founder of Burrell Education, Specialist For Pregnancy and Post Natal Fitness & Therapy, London, UK.

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Live Like Princess Puppy
I do believe that dear Poppy has greater emotional and literal intelligence than most human beings….and all the dog owners out there know what I mean here… this is the regime she employs to keep her figure:

1. She employs INTERMITTENT FASTING, somedays she eats masses, somedays not much at all.

2. Poppy always drinks her water, all day long.

3. Poppy doesn’t eat sweet things, processed food, trans fats or anything rubbish – just high class OPTIMUM NUTRITION dog food.

4. Oddly for a dog, she loves fish! A bit of smoked salmon goes down very well 🙂

5. She rests, lols around and sleeps most of the day in the comfiest spot in the house – some posh furry cushions ON MY BED!

6. She takes formal exercise 3 times a day and is always gagging for it, if I just mention the word OUT and she’s on my heels til we head out.

7. When on the lead, she heads off at a pace, employing the POWER WALKING STRATEGY.

8. When released from her lead she bombs around the park for 20 mins employing the HIGH INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING STRATEGY.

9. Nevermind 8 hours sleep, I’m sure she’s on more like 14! Truly and obviously obeying her CIRCADIAN RYTHMNS!

10. She is friendly, outgoing, extremely good natured and likes EVERYONE! She therefore is welcomed everywhere she goes and is always treated well by humans and her other doggy pals – OBVIOUSLY HAS VERY GOOD SELF-ESTEEM.

11. She is never angry, growly or bitey…..unless you are the postman…..what is that?

12. She has high emotional intelligence ie., shifts very quickly when I start swearing and stays very very close when I cry.

13. She only gets stressed when little children are around…she is scared of them for some reason! If they are in the park when she arrives, she turns around to leave. A perfect demonstration of knowing what’s good for her and walking away from things that aren’t. I BET HER CORTISOL ISN’T VERY HIGH!

14. She accepts all kind words and deeds offered graciously – tail wags when you praise her and you could easily get a numb arm just sitting there rubbing her belly for over an hour 🙂 SHE OBVIOUSLY HAS HIGH SELF-WORTH!

15. Finally, she hates going in the car!!!! Just pure organic walking for this simple girl.

Hhmmmm….so back to the title, don’t you agree – EAT, REST AND LIVE like Poppy and we’ve got it licked!

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Simply learn from your Dog! – obviously if you over feed and under exercise your dog, if it feels unloved and is stressed it’s probably overweight (like you.)

Jax.