1/10 Top Reasons to Drop Cardio for HIIT Training

Improved Insulin Sensitivity

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Are you finding you have to eat less and less to maintain or reduce your weight?
That suggests your metabolism needs a boost, and that just won’t happen if you starve yourself…

Read on to discover the first of 10 reasons why you need to include HIIT into your training program…

Insulin sensitivity, or how well your cells respond to insulin, has a big impact on how well you tolerate carbohydrates, and whether those carbohydrates will affect your ability to mobilize fatty acids. Reduced insulin sensitivity means you need more and more insulin to do the same job. And since insulin is a storage hormone, when it’s high, it’s more difficult to lose fat.
Following just 2 weeks of HIIT, in which there was a total of only 15 minutes of exercise, insulin sensitivity was improved by 23%

This means that your body will cope with the food you eat better, you’ll be much less likely to store fat and MUCH more likely to burn it!
So, you won’t have to starve yourself to lose fat and scale weight.

Research study….
The electronic version of the research article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/9/3

Study Detail Outline
Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males
John A Babraj1†, Niels BJ Vollaard1†, Cameron Keast1, Fergus M Guppy1, Greg Cottrell1 and James A Timmons12*

* Corresponding author: James A Timmons jamie.timmons@gmail.com

† Equal contributors
Author Affiliations
1 Translational Biomedicine, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2 The Wenner-Gren Institute, Arrhenius Laboratories, Stockholm University, Sweden

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BMC Endocrine Disorders 2009, 9:3 doi:10.1186/1472-6823-9-3

Received: 10 September 2008
Accepted: 28 January 2009
Published: 28 January 2009
© 2009 Babraj et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cheeseburger Better Than Cardio for Burning Fat Shock!

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Cardio Makes Your Entire Body Age Faster

You’ve seen how cardio makes you fat. You’ve seen how cardio ruins your heart and cripples your joints. But cardio also ages your entire body…

A recent article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that:
Cardio causes immense oxidative damage and a flood of free radicals to the body.

(Cakir-Atabek, H., Demir, S., Pinarbassili, R., Bunduz, N. Effects of Different Resistance Training Intensity on Indices of Oxidative Stress. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. September 2010. 24(9), 2491-2498.)

Free radicals are molecules that cause rapid aging in your body. During cardio, your body is filled with free radicals they wander around your bloodstream and attack your cells like a street thug. (They are the reason we all try to eat so many anti-oxidant rich foods)

Not only do free radicals cause damage to all your organs…doing cardio also damages your skin and makes you look older.

Dr. Laurence Kirwan, a plastic surgeon, claims that cardio can damage facial tissue and cause skin to sag. You see, cardio actually ages your skin and gives you that leathery, unattractive wrinkled look before your time.

That’s why you see runners who are in their forties with a wrinkled face like a 60-year old sun-worshipper. Their skin sags down and their face is a wrinkled mess.

I think it could be they spend their run grimacing- I’ve never seen a ‘Happy Jogger’ yet!

It’s a Fact, Cardio Makes You Fat, Tired, Unhappy and OLD

That’s exactly why cheeseburgers are better than treadmills for fat loss. You see, cheeseburgers aren’t the healthiest food choice…but they don’t do all the horrible things to your body that cardio does.

They don’t age you prematurely.

They don’t destroy your joints.

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And if you eat cheeseburgers, in moderation, they certainly don’t destroy your body’s natural ability to burn fat and build muscle.

That’s probably why the Wall Street Journal claimed that cardio is as bad as cheeseburgers. But in reality, cardio is WORSE.

“If Long, Slow and Boring Cardio is So Bad for Me, What Should I Do Instead?”

I’m glad you asked.
I’m going to explain what you should be doing instead of cardio.
It is completely possible, in only 90 minutes PER WEEK and get an amazing body.

This kind of training reverses the aging process, turns your body into a fat burning machine and you can do it in just 3 short 30-minute sessions per week. Or – you can do it in the comfort of your own home in 10 minute express workouts by following my online video workouts- but more about that later.

WARNING: This Isn’t For Everyone

I’m not going to lie to you: this kind of training isn’t for everyone.

– If you enjoy slaving away on a treadmill for hours and flooding your body with dangerous fat storing hormone, this is NOT for you.
– If you think that your joints are immune to damage and your heart won’t be damaged by excessive cardio, this is NOT for you.
– if you are not prepared to work hard in very short bursts, this is NOT for you.

Bottom line
– don’t run – walk…. Just make sure you walk FAST!
Or exercise hard, train fast, and FEEL FAB!

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5 Fitness Myths Busted

5 Fitness Myths Busted.

Myth #1: Crunches and Sit Ups & Curl Ups Help Bust Belly Fat

 

TRUTH: While exercises that target the abdomen can help tone and strengthen the muscles near your belly, they won’t make that paunch go away on their own. The human body doesn’t get rid of fat just in certain areas; when you exercise, fat loss is a full-body phenomenon. To reduce belly fat, focus on intense cardio workouts, supplemented by resistance training (which doesn’t have to include core exercises like crunches). And most importantly, fix your nutrition!

Myth #2: Women Should Stick to Light Weights to Avoid Bulking Up

 

TRUTH: The vast majority of women simply don’t have enough testosterone in their bodies to build the Arnold-like muscle mass that some want to avoid. In fact, lifting heavy weights, working with resistance bands and even body weight in suspension trainers will help women lose weight, gain increased definition, and build confidence.

Myth #3: Sweat is a Good Indicator of How Hard You’re Working

 

TRUTH: While a sweat-soaked t-shirt might make you feel super satisfied after a tough workout, there’s really no relationship between how much you sweat and how hard you’re working. So, next time you’re at the gym? Consider leaving that 90s style sweat suit at home.  Keep you’re sweating for the Turkish and Sauna after your workout.

Myth #4 : No pain, No Gain

 

TRUTH: There’s a big difference between pain and discomfort, says Michael Lagomarsine, an expert based out of Boston University’s Athletic Enhancement Center.

While you may have some muscle soreness after a particularly hard workout, anything that actively hurts while you’re doing it could be causing you damage. Extreme muscle pain for more than two or three days after a workout likely indicates that you worked at an intensity you are not used to – keep moving and don’t wait too long for your next workout. Your body is busy adapting, getting stronger and fitter, make sure you sleep and eat well to get the best results.

Myth #5: Stretching Before a Workout Helps Prevent Injuries

TRUTH: Multiple studies have found that stretching before a workout actually does nothing to prevent injuries. In fact, those who stretch before a run actually tend to wind up with more injuries than those who don’t.

I’ve been quoting these studies since the late 80’s, Don’t stretch a cold muscle ever!

 

Stretching after exercising seems to be the best option for those who want to avoid delayed onset muscle soreness.  That’s the soreness that kicks in 2 – 3 days after a workout. Instead of using stretches before a workout,  I include mobility to loosen joints, dynamic movements that focus on preparation for the exercises to follow.  I often use a series of plank exercises to create muscle heat and improve core strength to get off to a good start.

 

Myth #6: Low Intensity Cardio Burns Fat Best

TRUTH: You’re probably familiar with the “fat burn” zone on your favourite piece of cardio equipment, but there’s no proof that these zones are effective for fat burning. The idea that lower intensity cardio is better than high intensity cardio when it comes to losing weight is incorrect. When you stop your moderate cardio training your calories burning stops too. That’s why you pile the weight back on when you stop training or go on holiday!

According to exercise specialist and fitness author Tom Holland, fat loss is all about burning calories, and the more intense your workout, the more calories you’ll burn during your exercise and for up to 3 days after it’s finished.

 

Myth #7: Weight Machines Are Safer Than Free Weights.

 

TRUTH: This myth may actually put you at a higher risk for injury. Many gym enthusiasts stick to weight machines rather than learning how to use free weights, because they believe that the machine will correct their form and ensure that they don’t hurt themselves.

But there are still tons of ways you can use a weight machine that can damage your muscles and joints, from height and length adjustment to using weights that are too heavy to using the wrong muscle groups to push or pull. Whether you choose to use free weights or weights machines make sure you have a qualified trainer show you the ropes before you get started.

 

What other fitness myths have you heard that need to be busted?

 

Sources:

 

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Why Crossfit May NOT Be Good For You

Why Crossfit May Not Be Good For You

I found this and thought you should have a read….. a few interesting points about who Crossfit is aimed at, how hard you should train and do the coaches have enough training?  Anyone can ‘Beast’ a client  not many can ‘Coach’ clients……

This discussion seems to make sense to me – Coach Boyle is very respected in his field and in the industry as a whole.

 

Michael Boyle
                       

Crossfit gyms are springing up all over the world. They are cheap and easy to open, with only a weekend certification and a few thousand dollars worth of equipment. This appeals to many in the fitness business. You can be part of a rapidly growing trend and you can do it without great expense. I am not a Crossfit fan so some might view this piece as yellow journalism. I will try to keep my personal opinions to myself and deal with what is generally agreed upon as safe in strength and conditioning.

First, a little background. To be honest, I knew very little about Crossfit until I was contacted by representatives of SOMA, the Special Operations Medical Association, in 2005. Crossfit was their concern, not mine. I was asked to come to the SOMA meeting in Tampa, Florida to discuss training special operations soldiers. At a panel discussion in 2005 I offered answers to questions asked about Crossfit and the controversy began. What follows is not from the SOMA meeting but, my thoughts since.

Major Question 1- Is planned randomization a valid concept. Crossfit is based on the idea that the workouts are planned but deliberately random. I think that the term planned randomization is an oxymoron. Workouts are either planned or random. I believe strongly that workouts should be planned and that a specific progression should be followed to prevent injury.

I sometimes plan sessions that relate to each other week to week – but not Day to Day – is this also planned randomisation.

But seriously, I know what Coach Boyle means. To be effective programmes should gradually build in frequency, intensity, duration and type of training, over the short and very long term.

 

Major Question 2- Is Training to Failure Safe? Because Crossfit is, at it’s heart, a competitive or self-competitive program it becomes necessary to train to failure. There are two layers or problem here. One is the simple question of whether training to failure is beneficial to the trainee. Some strength and conditioning experts believe training to failure is beneficial, others caution against. I must admit that I like training to failure.

However, this brings up the larger question of what constitutes failure. Strength and Conditioning Coach Charles Poliquin (another non-Crossfit fan) popularized the term “technical failure” and, this is the definition that we adhere to.

Technical failure occurs not when the athlete or client is no longer capable of doing the exercise but, when the athlete or client can no longer do the exercise with proper technique. In training beyond technical failure the stress shifts to tissues that were not, and probably should not, be the target of the exercise. The third layer of the training to failure question relates to what movements lend themselves to training to failure. In the area of “generally agreed as safe”, high velocity movements like Olympic lifts and jumps are not generally done to failure and never should be taken beyond technical failure. Is it one bad rep versus multiple bad reps? How many bad reps is too many?

It seems mad to train beyond the point of having good form (therefore safe execution of the exercise)

 

Major Question 3- Is an overuse injury (generally an injury caused by repeated exposure to light loads), different from an overstress injury (an injury caused by exposure to heavy loads). Both are injuries.

The first is overuse, the second is trauma. In my mind injuries are injuries, period.

I agree – I am always looking for ways to include mobilisations to improve movement patterns, prepare for training and get more value out of the warm-up/prep phase of every workout.  My 5 week programme gives us a chance to really focus on muscle balance, injury prevention, 3 Dimension training and recovery.

 

Major Question 4- Should adults be Olympic lifters? I don’t think that Olympic lifts are for all adults. Most adults can’t get their arms safely over their head once much less fifty times with load. The other question that begs to be asked is should anyone do high rep Olympic lifts. I know the best Olympic lifters in the world say no. With all that said believe it or not my biggest problem is actually less with the actual workouts than it is with the false bravado and character assassination of dissenters. The community can be pretty venomous when you question Coach Glassman.

 

The Crossfit community is also filled with people who tell you that injury is a normal part of the training process. I have spoken up against endurance athletes who willingly hurt themselves and to me, this is no difference than the current Crossfit controversy. I know that this will generate more controversy but, Crossfit might be the biggest controversy in strength and conditioning since HIT training.

I use HIIT as a method in some programs….

Quite different to HIT.

HIT is High Intensity Training, HIIT is High Intensity Interval Training….  I can vary the interval to build endurance before I progress the load/weigh Intensity to improve strength.

This way, beginners can work alongside experienced clients without fear of injury or embarrassment!

 

 

Hope this will encourage you to question training methods and the quality of the ‘coaching’ available to you.

 

Jax Allen Fitness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Should You Work A Sore Muscle?

Should You Work A Sore Muscle?

This week I decided it was time to get some serious training into my own program. I woke up the Tuesday sore as @#$%.

Quite sore, then – Oh yes!

So naturally, I worked out – But not Bootcamp – I joined in with a complete Yoga class…….. Huh? Surely not, I hear you say?       You’re meant to rest for 48hrs or until the soreness eases off….. I don’t agree with this idea – anymore.

Most of us have only specific days and times free to train, time is so precious. Fortunately, I don’t adhere to that silliness anymore, and as a result, I’m able to offer great body transformation results in just a few weeks.

You see, it’s not uncommon for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) to last four or even five days after the completion of an intense training session; however, many studies have concluded that complete metabolic recovery (what you care about) occurs within 48 hours of exercise. In other words, you ARE recovered, yet there is still some residual soreness. Plain and simple, if metabolic recovery has taken place, a muscle can be worked again via the same training method, even if the muscle is still sore from a previous session.

Having said that, plenty of studies have shown that training a muscle while it is still recovering does NOT adversely affect recovery.

Here are just a few: Nosaka K, Clarkson P.M. Muscle damage following repeated bouts of high force eccentric exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exrc., 27(9):1263-1269,1995. Smith LL., Fuylmer MG., Holbert D., McCammon MR., Houmard JA., Frazer DD., Nsien E., Isreal RG.

The impact of repeated bout of eccentric exercise on muscular strength, muscle soreness and creatine kinase. Br J Sp Med 28(4):267-271, 1994. Chen, TC and S.S. Hsieh.

The effects of a seven-day repeated eccentric training on recovery from muscle damage. Med. Sci. Sports Exrc. 31(5 Supp) pp. S71, 1999. Nosaka K and M Newton.

Repeated eccentric exercise bouts do not exacerbate muscle damage and repair. J Strength Cond Res. 2002 Feb;16(1):117-22.

Conclusion: even if complete metabolic recovery has not yet occurred, the muscle can be trained again.

Now, technically, you could do the same exact workout again, but frankly, there are better ways to approach working a muscle for a second time within 48 hours of a previous session: and I’m sure you know my view on repeating workouts – WE DON’T DO THAT!

Option #1 – Conduct an “active recovery” session. With this approach you’d conduct a light, less taxing training session after a heavy, demanding session in order to facilitate recovery, decrease DOMS, and actually maximize strength gains. Simply put, as long as you continue to stimulate the nervous system, even if your body is not totally recovered (metabolically speaking), you’re going to see much better overall results. An example of this “continued stimulation” would be to do half the number of reps that you normally could do with a given weight, or perhaps train for half the normal time.

To illustrate, let’s say you did a killer workout on Monday. Like Ladders!! LOL. And let’s say you used resistance ( Bands and Med Balls) about 30 minutes of maximal effort. The active recovery method would suggest that on Tuesday, you’d only do 15 minutes with the same intensity. This type of workout both stimulates the nervous system and increases the flow of nutrient rich blood to the recovering muscles, leading to increased strength and recovery.

Option #2 – Change the stimulus and go all out again. If a muscle is still recovering, it wouldn’t be profitable to train it again via the same training method prior to recovery taking place. Yes, the above studies show that doing so will not substantially, adversely affect metabolic recovery, but at the same time, you won’t benefit either.

So what to do? Answer: use a different approach. Stimulate different muscle fibers and in turn yield a different overall physiological response. For example, if your workout was Ladders on Monday you’d want 20:10 Fast and Furious on Wednesday, and you would want 40:20 Metabolic Madness on Friday, and then perhaps Pilates Fitcamp on Saturday all with a variety of intervals and resistance loads.

I mix up the workouts for you and gradually increase the load over each 5 week cycle. You choose the weight/resistance, how many days you train and MOST importantly – what you do on rest days. Just remember this programme isn’t about coasting through or pacing so you finish every interval.. I like to see you challenge yourself and fail sometimes….. Really Go For It!! Every Rep Every Round…

Option #3 – Go for a Brisk Walk. Follow the rest day exercises as part of this system, put your outdoor trainers on, get outside and walk (briskly) for at least 15 minutes on rest days. As you get fitter walk faster – so it will always fit into your lunch break!!

I’m NOT suggesting you get into steady state Cardio Training – we all know that doesn’t give measurable Fat Loss results

Option #4 Try a Yoga or Pilates Session. New campers benefit from a good deep stretch every week, so Yoga with me or at home. Pilates will accelerate your Core Strength progress and allow you to work harder in your other workouts.

Lastly, a quote from a great coach on the subject: “Your body will only increase recovery if you force it to work more frequently. Initially, you may still have residual soreness from the previous workout, but don’t worry. Instead, work through it and your body will improve its recovery rate to the point where soreness will subside.” We all want to increase recovery capacity, gain more muscle, increase strength, and lose more fat? So, forget about “sitting on the bench” because of a little soreness. If you’re a new camper – a LOT of soreness!!! Instead, get yourself back in the studio quickly with one of the above two methods. In return, you can expect a lot more progress with a lot less soreness.

So what about you?

Do you ever train a sore muscle?

Do you judge the effectiveness of your workouts by how sore you feel the next day?

I know I feel great when I can’t sit without yelping! Maybe that’s just me?

Let Me Know…… Jax Allen    080212 ©