4/10 Top Reasons to Drop Cardio for HIIT

4/10 Improved Vo2 Max

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VO2 max is your body’s max capacity to transport and use oxygen during exercise. It is a great measure of physical fitness.
Generally speaking, the higher your VO2 max, the better your fitness level. A higher VO2 max also means that you can exercise at greater intensities for longer periods of time.
The good news is that doing HIIT will result in significant improvements in VO2 max [4]

This improvement can be achieved whether you are a beginner exerciser or an advanced athlete.

I have keen runners (not joggers) that were worried that if they swapped their daily miles for Smart HIIT with me their speed would drop off – they have found they are able to run less often – saving their joints – and still improve performance in terms of overall speed and distance but sprint finish in races.

They also find that they feel motivated and fresh when they do run! Result.

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Reference Study [4]
J Strength Cond Res. 2012 Jan;26(1):138-45. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318218dd77.
Effect of high-intensity interval training on cardiovascular function, VO2max, and muscular force.
Astorino TA, Allen RP, Roberson DW, Jurancich M.
Source
Department of Kinesiology, California State University, San Marcos, California, USA. astorino@csusm.edu
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiovascular function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular force. Active, young (age and body fat = 25.3 ± 4.5 years and 14.3 ± 6.4%) men and women (N = 20) of a similar age, physical activity, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) completed 6 sessions of HIIT consisting of repeated Wingate tests over a 2- to 3-week period. Subjects completed 4 Wingate tests on days 1 and 2, 5 on days 3 and 4, and 6 on days 5 and 6. A control group of 9 men and women (age and body fat = 22.8 ± 2.8 years and 15.2 ± 6.9%) completed all testing but did not perform HIIT. Changes in resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), VO2max, body composition, oxygen (O2) pulse, peak, mean, and minimum power output, fatigue index, and voluntary force production of the knee flexors and extensors were examined pretraining and posttraining. Results showed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in VO2max, O2 pulse, and Wingate-derived power output with HIIT. The magnitude of improvement in VO2max was related to baseline VO2max (r = -0.44, p = 0.05) and fatigue index (r = 0.50, p 0.05) in resting BP, HR, or force production was revealed. Data show that HIIT significantly enhanced VO2max and O2 pulse and power output in active men and women.
PMID: 22201691 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

3/10 Top Reason to Drop Cardio for HIIT

3/10 Specifically Targets Stomach Fat

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Yes, we all know that you can’t target fat loss per se. However, that’s not what we’re talking about here.

Doing situps isn’t going to target belly fat. However, there are things you can do that will change the way you store and mobilize fat. The way you store fat is determined by many factors – genetics and hormones being two big ones. The type of exercise you do affects your hormone profile.

Doing HIIT can create a metabolic environment that stimulates a higher proportional release of abdominal fat. You still lose fat all over, but a higher proportion comes off in the midsection.

High-intensity interval exercise three times per week for 15 weeks was compared to the same frequency of steady-state exercise, and only HIIT produced significant reductions in total body fat, subcutaneous leg and trunk fat, and insulin resistance [3].

Add to this clever changes to your food choices and you will set yourself up for great losses in belly fat. While abdominal exercises won’t burn fat off your belly – avoiding certain foods and adding others can and will make a big difference to your body shape.

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2/10 Top Reasons to Dump Cardio for HIIT Training.

2/10 Produces the Afterburn Effect

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Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), is the increased oxygen your body uses after an intense workout to erase its oxygen debt. It uses this oxygen to return the body to homeostasis. That means it uses additional calories to perform tasks such as muscle repair and replenishment of fuel stores. EPOC is better known as the afterburn effect, which is the process of burning extra calories long after your workout is over.

When comparing HIIT to low-intensity exercise (cardio), your exercise intensity positively affects both the magnitude and duration of EPOC [2]. In other words, the greater your intensity, the greater the afterburn effect.

Wouldn’t you rather burn X9 times more fat doing just 20 – 30 mins HIIT than grinding away for hours running, rowing or stepping, think of your poor joints!, and the fun you could be having with the time saved!!

Only 30 minutes of a Smart HIIT session will keep your metabolism boosted for up to 38hrs (that’s when the studies stopped recording- it will go on even longer!)
Just make sure you’re getting truly effective, metabolic HIIT and not just random circuit training – they are NOT the same thing.

I’ve seen and heard about some sketchy sessions with trainers that need to update their knowledge and do better fir their clients. Mine know I’m always studying the latest studies and updating my certifications – that’s why I offer a 200% money back guarantee – does your trainer do that?

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Reference Study [1]
Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males
John A Babraj1†, Niels BJ Vollaard1†, Cameron Keast1, Fergus M Guppy1, Greg Cottrell1 and James A Timmons12*

* Corresponding author: James A Timmons jamie.timmons@gmail.com

† Equal contributors
Author Affiliations
1 Translational Biomedicine, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2 The Wenner-Gren Institute, Arrhenius Laboratories, Stockholm University, Sweden

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BMC Endocrine Disorders 2009, 9:3 doi:10.1186/1472-6823-9-3

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/9/3

Received: 10 September 2008
Accepted: 28 January 2009
Published: 28 January 2009
© 2009 Babraj et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract
Background
Traditional high volume aerobic exercise training reduces cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk but involves a substantial time commitment. Extremely low volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) has recently been demonstrated to produce improvements to aerobic function, but it is unknown whether HIT has the capacity to improve insulin action and hence glycemic control.

Methods
Sixteen young men (age: 21 ± 2 y; BMI: 23.7 ± 3.1 kg·m-2; VO2peak: 48 ± 9 ml·kg-1·min-1) performed 2 weeks of supervised HIT comprising of a total of 15 min of exercise (6 sessions; 4–6 × 30-s cycle sprints per session). Aerobic performance (250-kJ self-paced cycling time trial), and glucose, insulin and NEFA responses to a 75-g oral glucose load (oral glucose tolerance test; OGTT) were determined before and after training.

Results
Following 2 weeks of HIT, the area under the plasma glucose, insulin and NEFA concentration-time curves were all reduced (12%, 37%, 26% respectively, all P < 0.001). Fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations remained unchanged, but there was a tendency for reduced fasting plasma NEFA concentrations post-training (pre: 350 ± 36 v post: 290 ± 39 μmol·l-1, P = 0.058). Insulin sensitivity, as measured by the Cederholm index, was improved by 23% (P < 0.01), while aerobic cycling performance improved by ~6% (P < 0.01).

Conclusion
The efficacy of a high intensity exercise protocol, involving only ~250 kcal of work each week, to substantially improve insulin action in young sedentary subjects is remarkable. This novel time-efficient training paradigm can be used as a strategy to reduce metabolic risk factors in young and middle aged sedentary populations who otherwise would not adhere to time consuming traditional aerobic exercise regimes.

1/10 Top Reasons to Drop Cardio for HIIT Training

Improved Insulin Sensitivity

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Are you finding you have to eat less and less to maintain or reduce your weight?
That suggests your metabolism needs a boost, and that just won’t happen if you starve yourself…

Read on to discover the first of 10 reasons why you need to include HIIT into your training program…

Insulin sensitivity, or how well your cells respond to insulin, has a big impact on how well you tolerate carbohydrates, and whether those carbohydrates will affect your ability to mobilize fatty acids. Reduced insulin sensitivity means you need more and more insulin to do the same job. And since insulin is a storage hormone, when it’s high, it’s more difficult to lose fat.
Following just 2 weeks of HIIT, in which there was a total of only 15 minutes of exercise, insulin sensitivity was improved by 23%

This means that your body will cope with the food you eat better, you’ll be much less likely to store fat and MUCH more likely to burn it!
So, you won’t have to starve yourself to lose fat and scale weight.

Research study….
The electronic version of the research article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/9/3

Study Detail Outline
Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males
John A Babraj1†, Niels BJ Vollaard1†, Cameron Keast1, Fergus M Guppy1, Greg Cottrell1 and James A Timmons12*

* Corresponding author: James A Timmons jamie.timmons@gmail.com

† Equal contributors
Author Affiliations
1 Translational Biomedicine, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2 The Wenner-Gren Institute, Arrhenius Laboratories, Stockholm University, Sweden

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Endocrine Disorders 2009, 9:3 doi:10.1186/1472-6823-9-3

Received: 10 September 2008
Accepted: 28 January 2009
Published: 28 January 2009
© 2009 Babraj et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cheeseburger Better Than Cardio for Burning Fat Shock!

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Cardio Makes Your Entire Body Age Faster

You’ve seen how cardio makes you fat. You’ve seen how cardio ruins your heart and cripples your joints. But cardio also ages your entire body…

A recent article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that:
Cardio causes immense oxidative damage and a flood of free radicals to the body.

(Cakir-Atabek, H., Demir, S., Pinarbassili, R., Bunduz, N. Effects of Different Resistance Training Intensity on Indices of Oxidative Stress. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. September 2010. 24(9), 2491-2498.)

Free radicals are molecules that cause rapid aging in your body. During cardio, your body is filled with free radicals they wander around your bloodstream and attack your cells like a street thug. (They are the reason we all try to eat so many anti-oxidant rich foods)

Not only do free radicals cause damage to all your organs…doing cardio also damages your skin and makes you look older.

Dr. Laurence Kirwan, a plastic surgeon, claims that cardio can damage facial tissue and cause skin to sag. You see, cardio actually ages your skin and gives you that leathery, unattractive wrinkled look before your time.

That’s why you see runners who are in their forties with a wrinkled face like a 60-year old sun-worshipper. Their skin sags down and their face is a wrinkled mess.

I think it could be they spend their run grimacing- I’ve never seen a ‘Happy Jogger’ yet!

It’s a Fact, Cardio Makes You Fat, Tired, Unhappy and OLD

That’s exactly why cheeseburgers are better than treadmills for fat loss. You see, cheeseburgers aren’t the healthiest food choice…but they don’t do all the horrible things to your body that cardio does.

They don’t age you prematurely.

They don’t destroy your joints.

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And if you eat cheeseburgers, in moderation, they certainly don’t destroy your body’s natural ability to burn fat and build muscle.

That’s probably why the Wall Street Journal claimed that cardio is as bad as cheeseburgers. But in reality, cardio is WORSE.

“If Long, Slow and Boring Cardio is So Bad for Me, What Should I Do Instead?”

I’m glad you asked.
I’m going to explain what you should be doing instead of cardio.
It is completely possible, in only 90 minutes PER WEEK and get an amazing body.

This kind of training reverses the aging process, turns your body into a fat burning machine and you can do it in just 3 short 30-minute sessions per week. Or – you can do it in the comfort of your own home in 10 minute express workouts by following my online video workouts- but more about that later.

WARNING: This Isn’t For Everyone

I’m not going to lie to you: this kind of training isn’t for everyone.

– If you enjoy slaving away on a treadmill for hours and flooding your body with dangerous fat storing hormone, this is NOT for you.
– If you think that your joints are immune to damage and your heart won’t be damaged by excessive cardio, this is NOT for you.
– if you are not prepared to work hard in very short bursts, this is NOT for you.

Bottom line
– don’t run – walk…. Just make sure you walk FAST!
Or exercise hard, train fast, and FEEL FAB!

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