2. Aerobics: Myths,Lies and Misconceptions

Another interesting article… Take heed you Queens of Cardio!

2. Aerobics: Myths,Lies and Misconceptions

By Mike Mentzer

That’s how my associates and I train our fitness-oriented clients. To help them achieve a more productive, healthy and happy life, optimize the time they spend in the gym and achieve total fitness, we carefully supervise them through a series of high-intensity, low-force weight-training exercises. We accomplish that in two workouts a week averaging 20 to 30 minutes.

The major problem in the field of bodybuilding and fitness is the near-universal—but erroneous—belief that more is better. As children many people acquire the notion that more candy is better than less, then blindly misapply that notion to other areas. Past a very definite, limited point, candy makes you sick and fat and causes dental problems.

It’s a similar situation with exercise. Imposing just the right amount of exercise stress will cause a positive result, and anything beyond that will cause a negative result. As it turns out, the proper amount of exercise required to achieve optimal results isn’t nearly as much as you’ve been led to believe—hence your lack of satisfactory progress in the past.

If more is better, why train only two or three hours a day? Why not take a vacation from work and train 18 hours a day? Then you’re sure to succeed, right? By the way, those stories about movie stars training five hours a day to get in shape for films are bunk. No one except a slave under a whip can sustain the motivation to train that much day in and day out. Females, especially, with their naturally lower testosterone levels, simply can’t tolerate as much high-intensity-exercise stress as some are reported to be engaging in.

I’ve visited gyms in every corner of the world. Most people train at least three days a week for one hour per session. Why? It just so happens that in our culture the number three has a certain traditional magic. We have the Three Bears, the Three Stooges, the Holy Trinity, three square meals a day and the mystic concept that catastrophes happen in threes. Therefore, it’s only logical and scientific that we should train three times a week.

The lunatic fringe in the field of bodybuilding has turned exercise into a religion of sorts, spending hours every day of the week mindlessly pumping iron, stretching, jogging and so on. Those people don’t exercise as a means of achieving a single, albeit important, value with a hierarchy of numerous other life-affirming goals. For them going to the gym is a social ritual that helps them manage the anxiety that inevitably results from the refusal to learn how to think and judge as mature, independent adults.

While it may be laudable on one level to make it to the gym four to six times a week for two hours of training per session, on another it isn’t. The idea shouldn’t be to go to the gym to prove that you’re a good Puritan but to go conscientiously prepared to do what nature requires in the way of imposing the requisite training stress—and in the right amount.

Whether your goal is a more modest one—to build greater strength and lean mass, lose fat and improve overall conditioning—or a grand one—to build strength and muscle for high-level sports or bodybuilding competition—keep in mind that overtraining isn’t merely wasted effort, it’s counterproductive.

There’s no question that being in good physical condition is an absolute requirement for living a rewarding, happy and healthy life; however, it’s neither necessary nor desirable to spend an hour or two every day to achieve it. It’s not necessary, as optimal results—total fitness—can be achieved by doing well under two hours of resistance training a week. Any more than that and you’re spending more time pursuing a particular value than a normal life demands.

Even Kenneth Cooper—the man responsible for single-handedly launching the aerobics movement—recanted, stating that he was wrong all those years, that more exercise is not better than less. A while back Dr. Cooper and his associates at the Cooper Aerobics Center in Dallas became alarmed at the rising incidence of serious medical problems—heart disease and cancer—among clients who jogged six days a week, some of whom threw in three days a week of weight training for good measure. They were purists, people who exercised, didn’t smoke, drink alcohol or eat much in the way of fats. Cooper was stymied at first, but by the end of the investigation he determined that overtraining was the cause.

Interesting, Eh?

Please follow this blog if you like it, thanks

Jax x

Cardio DAMAGES Your Heart, Joints, and Back

Cardio DAMAGES Your Heart, Joints, and Back

Some of this article is a little extreme in it’s point of view- but the basics see to be gaining more and more scientific support and evidence!

In 1977, Jim Fixx published The Complete Book of Running. In 1984, Jim Fixx died of a massive heart after his daily run.

He was 52 years old.

Fixx is the misguided man behind the entire cardio craze.

He’s the guy behind our dangerous obsession with cardio.

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Now, scientists realize how insane Fixx’s exercise guidance really was. If you struggle with your weight and still do cardio…then it’s not your fault.

Even Dr. Kenneth Cooper, the founder of aerobics, recently admitted that he was WRONG about cardio. In his latest book, he said there is “no correlation between ‘aerobic’ endurance performance and healthy, longevity or protection against heart disease.”

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You’ve been LIED to…

And this lie has put your health in jeopardy.

If you don’t want to suffer the same fate as Jim Fixx, then you need to pay close attention now.

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Your life is at risk.

You see, cardio overworks your heart and can lead to death by massive heart attack, all because your body has not evolved to handle long, slow and boring cardio.

The man who ran the first marathon, the Greek soldier Pheidippides, dropped dead as he arrived in Athens with news of victory. We weren’t meant to run marathons.

You’ve heard about young, seemingly healthy marathon runners suddenly dying during their races. And yet people still run to “be healthy.”

That’s crazy right?

Take Normann Stadler for example. Stadler was a previous Ironman winner and serious cardio enthusiast. In 2011, he underwent emergency surgery to repair an enormous aortic aneurysm. He had ruined his heart by doing too much cardio.

John Mandrola, a heart doctor, said “Studies have shown elevated levels of coronary plaque in serial marathoners – a problem that rigorous exercise theoretically could cause. Heart disease comes from inflammation and if you’re constantly, chronically inflaming yourself, never letting your body heal, why wouldn’t there be a relationship between over exercise and heart disease?”

Kelly Barrett, a 43 year old mother of 3 suffered from cardiac arrest during the Chicago Marathon. She died a few days later.

Carlos Jose Gomes of Brazil collapsed shortly after finishing the New York City Marathon. Cause of death? Heart attack.

Ryan Shay, an Olympic Marathon hopeful, died suddenly during the early stages of the Olympic Trials Marathon in New York City.

Dr. Matthew Hardy, age 50, died after running the New York City Marathon.

And those are just a few of the people that cardio has killed in recent years.

This saddens and frustrates me because these deaths were completely avoidable.

So not only does cardio damage your heart, it also wrecks your joints.

When running, did you know that every time your foot hits the treadmill it experiences 3 times your bodyweight in impact stress?

That means that if you weigh 200 pounds, every stride you take puts 600 pounds of pressure on your legs and back.

What do you think happens next?

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Your joints aren’t used to having 600 pounds of pressure on them. Your cartilage breaks down and you get searing pain in your knees, hips, ankles, feet and back.

Every single step sends a shockwave through your entire lower body which can cripple you. You’ve seen former runners suffer and limp along. They need knee replacements at 45 or have chronic overuse injuries that prevent them from walking without pain.

Do you want that?

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Cardio is a recipe for being crippled – or dead – in middle age. Yet the fitness industry still tries to convince you that doing this dangerous activity is good for your health.

Did you know that the 2nd most common cause of baby boomer doctor visits are sport’s related injuries? As people get older, the consequences of their cardio come back to bite them in the butt. Dr. Nicholas DiNubile, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital even gave it a catchy name: “Boomeritis.”

He also said: “Baby boomers are falling apart – developing tendinitis, bursitis, arthritis.”

You could end up spending your “golden years” shuffling around in a walker and look ancient before your time.

I don’t even need to tell you how expensive orthopedic surgery can be. Your cardio could cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars in surgery, rehabilitation and job loss because you can’t work anymore.

And that’s if a heart attack from cardio doesn’t kill you first.