Are you deficient in essential nutrients?

1. Are You Deficient?

1. Vitamin D

This vitamin helps regulate calcium absorption in your gut. It also helps maintain bone strength, healthy muscles, a well functioning nervous system, and is important for immune function and cell growth.

You might be deficient if you are experiencing digestive or gut issues, a weakened immune system, or even feeling depressed.

To get more try eating more eggs, milk, cheese and butter. Mushrooms can also be a great source of Vitamin D. Fish such as cod, salmon, mackerel, and tuna. Perhaps the most efficient way to get more Vitamin D is to get out in the sun. Our bodies naturally produce it when exposed to sunlight so try getting at least 10 to 20 minutes a day.

Go for a walk at lunchtime, park further away from work or the shops, expose your skin – you don’t need factor 50 ALL year round – feel healthy and alive! 
P.s. I’m not suggesting you strip off in public tho’, especially this time of year. The UK is at a latitude meaning we don’t get the Suns rays at an angle where we get enough Vitamin D even if we streak around the garden naked in Autumn, Winter and even part of Spring. 
Think about a supplement – you can get soft gels to chew or an under the tongue spray and you’re golden! 

Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix Liquid

my choice from The Nutrition Centre Cheltenham

Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix Liquid  
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix is an intense electrolyte liquid, sourced from the Great Salt Lake, Utah in the USA.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix contains Electrolytes, which are mineral salts dissolved in the body’s blood and fluid, they carry an electric charge and therefore can affect the blood’s pH and muscle function.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix’s mineral salts includes: Sodium, chloride, magnesium and potassium. These are involved in balancing the fluid throughout the body including the volume of fluid within the blood.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix benefits:

  
 Water movement is controlled by the concentration of electrolytes on either side of the cell membrane. Exercise increases fluid loss through sweat. If this fluid is not replaced then dehydration will occur. Dehydration impairs performance as blood volume

decreases and body temperature increases; extra strain will be put on the heart and lungs. The loss of fluid will also lead to an electrolyte imbalance as sodium and potassium are lost through the skin. This imbalance can cause a disruption to the cell’s ability to carry electrical charges and hence reduce athletic performance.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix contains all the necessary electrolytes in an ionic form as well as all other minerals naturally present in sea water. Ionic refers to the mineral being ionically charged (attached to a negatively charged mineral complex).It is important that the electrolytes are present in an ionic form as this is necessary for effective hydration.
In a study looking into the importance of electrolytes for rehydration, eight participants consumed plain water, and eight participants consumed water plus an electrolyte additive. The addition of an electrolyte mixture to plain water decreased the overall fluid levels required for optimal hydration compared to the plain water group. Supplementing water with electrolytes can therefore minimize carrying excessive weight, possibly reducing fatigue during extended exercise.
Viridian Sports Electrolyte Fix is comprised of a blend of naturally occurring brine from the Great Salt Lake containing sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium as well as vast array of other trace and ultra trace elements.

Is Your Diet Really Healthy? Pt. 1

Is Your Diet Really Healthy? Pt. 1

Identify and remove nutritional deficiencies

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Mission Impossible Plan….
Most people think they need a complete overhaul at first.
“I have to cut out sugar… and dairy… and carbs… and saturated fat.
Plus I have to eat more protein… more healthy fats… and more vegetables.
Not a lot of fruit, though.
I have to start drinking lots of water too.
And exercise… maybe a 6 am boot camp… yeah.”

I don’t know about you, but I get exhausted just thinking about changing all this, all at once. Let’s call it the “Mission Impossible” approach.

After coaching many clients over the years, I’ve come to realize that the Mission Impossible approach isn’t just difficult; it’s misguided.

Because a complete overhaul rarely addresses what’s making most people feel bad in the first place.
Often, people struggle with how they look and feel because their physiology doesn’t work the way it should.
This can be hormonal imbalances, but it’s more often dietary deficiency: not getting the right nutrients, in the right amounts, to get the best results.
Dietary deficiencies, therefore, are the first red flag that something’s wrong.

Just how common are dietary deficiencies?
The research in this area is pretty telling. A study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition showed that it’s really hard to get all the essential vitamins and minerals from food alone.
This study analyzed 70 athlete diets. Every single diet was deficient in at least three nutrients. Some diets were missing up to fifteen nutrients! The most common deficiencies?
iodine
vitamin D
zinc
vitamin E
calcium

Another study, also published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, showed that people following one of four popular diet plans (including Atkins, South Beach, and the DASH diet) were also very likely to be micronutrient deficient, particularly in six key micronutrients:
vitamin B7
vitamin D
vitamin E
chromium
iodine
molybdenum

A study at University of Western Ontario, of nearly 600 fourth-year exercise and nutrition undergraduate students showed less than 10% met the minimum standards for a “complete, balanced diet”. Like the other studies, they were missing such nutrients as:
zinc
magnesium
vitamin D
omega 3 fatty acids
protein

Bottom line: Dietary deficiencies are very common. Chances are, you’ve got one, no matter how good you think your diet is.
That’s a problem because when you’re deficient in key nutrients, your physiology doesn’t work properly. And when your body doesn’t work as it should, you feel rotten.

Just how important is this first step?
Energy levels, appetite, strength, endurance, and mood all rely on getting enough of these essential nutrients. When you don’t get them, things break down.

That’s why you can eat “clean”, go Paleo, avoid meat, lower your carbs, or count calories – you can do “everything right” nutritionally – and still feel lousy.

You need to identify your red flags from the very beginning and start eliminating them, one by one.

What are the common nutritional red flags?
Here are the most common deficiencies I see with new clients:
water (low-level dehydration)
vitamins and minerals
protein (particularly in women and in men with low appetites)
essential fatty acids (95% of the population is deficient here)

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To find out where you stand-
A). you could get your diet analyzed by a dietitian
B). you could also record what you eat each day and enter it into an online diet calculator like the ones at Fitday or Livestrong.com.

Or – let me do a quick survey of what you’re eating, analyse your body composition and measure where you are now.
From there, I can advise you better towards
– eating more of the protein-rich foods you prefer;
– drinking more hydrating fluids;
– taking in more essential fats (through the use of fish or algae oil);
– eating more foods rich in the vitamins and minerals you need most.

Without any other advanced screening or crazy dietary changes, you will start feeling better. You will lose fat and gain lean muscle. Feel more motivated. And your workouts will become easier and better.

The power of removing nutrient deficiencies
Here’s just one example (of many): Research in the British Journal of Psychiatry shows that providing fish oil and a multivitamin to prison inmates reduces aggressive and violent behavior by 35% and decreases antisocial behavior by 26%.
Also, a paper published in Nutrition Reviews shows that giving children fish oil and a multivitamin improves both their behavior and intelligence scores. (Who doesn’t want a smarter, better-behaved children?)

That’s the power of removing nutrient deficiencies. When our bodies don’t have the nutrients they need to do their work, we all suffer.

But as soon as we get these nutrients, we thrive.

Book your Nutrition check up NOW
If you’re training with me you get this included with your plan.

If you’re local you can message or text me to book
07831 680086. Jaxallenfitness@gmail.com

Fees: £25 initial assessment. £20 follow-ups
Time: 40-60minutes

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Jax

Why I Eat 7 Walnuts Every Day!

Why I Eat 7 Walnuts Every Day!

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One-quarter cup of walnuts, that’s about 1 oz for instance, provides more than 100 percent of the daily recommended value of plant-based omega rich fats, along with high amounts of copper, manganese, molybdenum, and biotin

Walnuts may help reduce not only the risk of prostate cancer, but breast cancer as well

Walnuts contain the amino acid l-arginine, which offers multiple vascular benefits to people with heart disease, or those who have increased risk for heart disease due to multiple cardiac risk factors

Walnuts contain several unique and powerful antioxidants that are available in only a few commonly eaten foods

Walnuts may improve sperm quality, help with weight control, and offer support for brain health and type 2 diabetes

All good arguments to include them in your eating plan too!

They also make a great snack as long as you prepare your daily portions.
Don’t make the mistake of carrying a big bag with you, it’s too easy to mindlessly eat a weeks worth!

Eat Clean, Train Smart, Expect Results.

Jax

A Nutritional Mineral Journey

A NUTRITIONAL JOURNEY INTO MINERALS

MINERALS: Why we need the essential minerals in order to be healthy physically and mentally and hormonally!

Like vitamins, minerals cannot be made by the body, therefore we have to get them from our diets. Here we are going to have a look at the ten major minerals and five trace minerals.

Major Minerals: Calcium, Chloride, Fluorine, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Sulphur, Zinc

Trace Minerals: Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Manganese, Selenium

Calcium: Is needed for building and maintaining healthy bones and teeth and works best when combined with phosphorus and magnesium. Helps with muscle contraction, aching muscles and nerve transmission. Can aid with weight loss and high blood pressure. Can also help to lower the risk of bowel cancer and can ease menstrual pain.

Is essential for blood clotting and for balancing our hormones.

Sources: Dairy products, almonds, dark green leafy vegetables, tinned fish, shellfish, pulses and sunflower seeds, linseeds and sesame seeds.

It is essential to obtain enough calcium for people who do a lot of exercise, particularly for regular runners and those who do weight training!

Chloride: Works alongside sodium and potassium to balance the fluids in the body. Helps with the digestive process- digestion and elimination.

Sources: A balanced diet of whole foods supplies enough of this mineral as a deficiency is extremely rare. Just a pinch of salt provides a third of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)

Flourine: This mineral is stored in our teeth and bones.

Sources: Is generally found as flouride in water and food as tiny amounts come from the soil and from animals skin and tissues.

Iron: Is vital for transporting oxygen to and from our cells and for the making of red blood cells. Is crucial also for energy production.

People who do a lot of running or high impact sport should be aware that losses can occur due to the pounding of the feet so may require more than the average person.

Sources: Meat, liver, nuts, seeds, dried fruit, dark green leafy vegetables, brown rice, wholegrains, fortified cereals and oatmeal.

Magnesium: Is essential for healthy teeth and bones. Is needed to help muscles contract and relax and is essential for the nervous system.

Can also help with pre menstrual symptoms/syndrome.

Sources: Milk, meat, wholemeal bread, nuts and raisins.

Phosphorus: Works together with calcium to make calcium phosphorus. Helps to maintain strong bones and teeth, helps with energy production and can help with the metabolism.

Sources: Most foods contain phosphorus, particularly protein rich foods such as fish, poultry, meat, eggs, milk and wholegrain cereals.

Potassium: Is needed to balance the fluids in the body alongside sodium. Is crucial for healthy nerves, muscle function, muscle relaxation and heart functioning. Also aids in ingestion and digestion and transporting nutrients to all cells.

Sources: Is generally found in all fruits such as bananas, apples and pineapples and leafy green vegetables. Wholegrains and sunflower seeds.

Sodium: Is needed to balance the water in the body alongside the minerals and blood and is vital for nervous system.

Sources: Is found in most foods such as meat, dairy products, nuts so is extremely rare to deficient in this mineral.

Sulphur: Helps to balance blood sugar levels, helps with the metabolism and is part of every cell in the body.

Is found in all protein rich foods therefore if you eat sufficient protein such as meat, fish, eggs, you will be obtaining enough sulphur.

Zinc: Is essential for the healing of wounds, for the nervous system and for the immune system. Helps to balance the hormonal system, the menstrual cycle and for male and female fertility.

Sources: Meat, chicken, fish, seafood, eggs, seeds, nuts, wholegrains, oats, pumpkin and sunflower seeds and dairy products.

Chromium: The main role is to balance our blood sugar and hormone balance as well as our metabolism. Helps to reduce sugar cravings and may help with diabetes.

Is important for heart function.

Sources: Wholegrain cereals, wholemeal bread, rye bread, brewers yeast, eggs, chicken, lamb, honey, grapes, raisins, apples, swiss cheese and potatoes.

Copper: Is vital for DNA and RNA (part of our genetic make up) and essential for the synthesis of every cell in our bodies. Is an antioxidant therefore may help in the prevention of cancer and heart disease. Antioxidants help our bodies to fight infections and ward off free radicals.

Sources: Many foods contain copper such as meat, green vegetables, nuts, raisins, bread and cereals.

Iodine: Helps to make up the thyroid hormones which in turn help to control our metabolism.

Sources: Milk and milk products, seafood and seaweed, kelp and iodized salt.

Manganese: Is vital for reproduction and for DNA and RNA. Is essential for brain function, reproduction and for the making of red blood cells. Helps to keep blood sugar levels stable.

Sources: Wholegrains, oats, rye, green leafy vegetables, eggs, nuts, carrots, watercress, berries, pineapple and grapes.

Selenium: An antioxidant which helps to ward off free radicals, helps to boost the immune system and is essential for male and female fertility. Helps against heart disease and certain cancers.

Sources: Wholegrains, wheatgerm, eggs, brazil nuts, fish-especially tuna, meat, chicken, mushrooms.

So to sum up this weeks article on ‘minerals’ we can again see that if we are lacking in any one of these then our health and well being will be at a disadvantage.

We can see that we need to have a varied ‘diet’ in order to obtain the essential minerals to function at optimum levels. Remember, our health isn’t just about how we look on the outside but also about how our bodies are functioning on the inside!!!

 

A Nutritional Journey Into Minerals

A NUTRITIONAL JOURNEY INTO MINERALS

MINERALS: Why we need the essential minerals in order to be healthy physically and mentally and hormonally!

Like vitamins, minerals cannot be made by the body, therefore we have to get them from our diets. This week we are going to have a look at the ten major minerals and five trace minerals.

Major Minerals: Calcium, Chloride, Fluorine, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Sulphur, Zinc

Trace Minerals: Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Manganese, Selenium

Calcium: Is needed for building and maintaining healthy bones and teeth and works best when combined with phosphorus and magnesium. Helps with muscle contraction, aching muscles and nerve transmission. Can aid with weight loss and high blood pressure. Can also help to lower the risk of bowel cancer and can ease menstrual pain.

Is essential for blood clotting and for balancing our hormones.

Calcium Sources: Dairy products, almonds, dark green leafy vegetables, tinned fish, shellfish, pulses and sunflower seeds, linseeds and sesame seeds.

It is essential to obtain enough calcium for people who do a lot of exercise, particularly for regular runners and those who do weight training!

Chloride: Works alongside sodium and potassium to balance the fluids in the body. Helps with the digestive process- digestion and elimination.

Chloride Sources: A balanced diet of whole foods supplies enough of this mineral as a deficiency is extremely rare. Just a pinch of salt provides a third of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)

Flourine: This mineral is stored in our teeth and bones.

Flourine Sources: Is generally found as flouride in water and food as tiny amounts come from the soil and from animals skin and tissues.

Iron: Is vital for transporting oxygen to and from our cells and for the making of red blood cells. Is crucial also for energy production.

People who do a lot of running or high impact sport should be aware that losses can occur due to the pounding of the feet so may require more than the average person.

Iron Sources: Meat, liver, nuts, seeds, dried fruit, dark green leafy vegetables, brown rice, wholegrains, fortified cereals and oatmeal.

Magnesium: Is essential for healthy teeth and bones. Is needed to help muscles contract and relax and is essential for the nervous system.

Can also help with pre menstrual symptoms/syndrome.

Magnesium Sources: Milk, meat, wholemeal bread, nuts and raisins.

Phosphorus: Works together with calcium to make calcium phosphorus. Helps to maintain strong bones and teeth, helps with energy production and can help with the metabolism.

Phosphorus Sources: Most foods contain phosphorus, particularly protein rich foods such as fish, poultry, meat, eggs, milk and wholegrain cereals.

Potassium: Is needed to balance the fluids in the body alongside sodium. Is crucial for healthy nerves, muscle function, muscle relaxation and heart functioning. Also aids in ingestion and digestion and transporting nutrients to all cells.

Potassium Sources: Is generally found in all fruits such as bananas, apples and pineapples and leafy green vegetables. Wholegrains and sunflower seeds.

Sodium: Is needed to balance the water in the body alongside the minerals and blood and is vital for nervous system.

Sodium Sources: Is found in most foods such as meat, dairy products, nuts so is extremely rare to deficient in this mineral.

Sulphur: Helps to balance blood sugar levels, helps with the metabolism and is part of every cell in the body.

Sulphur Sources: found in all protein rich foods therefore if you eat sufficient protein such as meat, fish, eggs, you will be obtaining enough sulphur.

Zinc: Is essential for the healing of wounds, for the nervous system and for the immune system. Helps to balance the hormonal system, the menstrual cycle and for male and female fertility.

Zinc Sources: Meat, chicken, fish, seafood, eggs, seeds, nuts, wholegrains, oats, pumpkin and sunflower seeds and dairy products.

Chromium: The main role is to balance our blood sugar and hormone balance as well as our metabolism. Helps to reduce sugar cravings and may help with diabetes.

Is important for heart function.

Chromium Sources: Wholegrain cereals, wholemeal bread, rye bread, brewers yeast, eggs, chicken, lamb, honey, grapes, raisins, apples, swiss cheese and potatoes.

Copper: Is vital for DNA and RNA (part of our genetic make up) and essential for the synthesis of every cell in our bodies. Is an antioxidant therefore may help in the prevention of cancer and heart disease. Antioxidants help our bodies to fight infections and ward off free radicals.

Copper Sources: Many foods contain copper such as meat, green vegetables, nuts, raisins, bread and cereals.

Iodine: Helps to make up the thyroid hormones which in turn help to control our metabolism.

Iodine Sources: Milk and milk products, seafood and seaweed, kelp and iodized salt.

Manganese: Is vital for reproduction and for DNA and RNA. Is essential for brain function, reproduction and for the making of red blood cells. Helps to keep blood sugar levels stable.

Manganese Sources: Wholegrains, oats, rye, green leafy vegetables, eggs, nuts, carrots, watercress, berries, pineapple and grapes.

Selenium: An antioxidant which helps to ward off free radicals, helps to boost the immune system and is essential for male and female fertility. Helps against heart disease and certain cancers.

Selenium Sources: Wholegrains, wheatgerm, eggs, brazil nuts, fish-especially tuna, meat, chicken, mushrooms.

So to sum up this weeks article on ‘minerals’ we can again see that if we are lacking in any one of these then our health and well being will be at a disadvantage.

We can see that we need to have a varied ‘diet’ in order to obtain the essential minerals to function at optimum levels. Remember, our health isn’t just about how we

look on the outside but also about how our bodies are functioning on the inside!!!