Critical Signs Of Low Thyroid And What Can Help

Are you putting on weight or worried about hair loss and lack of energy or sleep? These can all be signs of a sluggish thyroid and low progesterone levels. – maybe Selenium too!

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According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, about one in eight women will develop a thyroid problem in her lifetime. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that influences metabolism and the function of the kidneys, heart, liver, brain and skin.

Dr John Lee, who was the pioneer of bioidentical natural progesterone usage for women at menopause, wrote that he was very surprised in his own medical practice with the much greater numbers of women than men taking thyroid supplements and that they were suffering from oestrogen dominance, where their oestrogen levels are not in balance with their progesterone as happens at menopause, or after a hysterectomy.
He used bioidentical natural progesterone to correct this situation and rebalance their hormones and found that it was then common to see their need for medications such as Thyroxine to be reduced over time.

Critical signs
Many women are showing signs of thyroid imbalance due to a number of factors, including poor diet, stress, over reliance on stimulants such as caffeine, sugar and alcohol.
Do you have any of these?
* adult onset ADHD
* anxiety
* cold hands or feet
* difficulty concentrating
* dry skin/yellow skin
* fatigue
* impaired memory
* insomnia/poor sleep quality or habits
* menstrual irregularities
* muscle and joint pain
* nightmares
* slow healing
* thinning hair, or eyebrows or loss of outer edges of eyebrows
* weight gain or difficulty losing weight

Natural help
You can do a lot to help yourself through your diet as the thyroid gland must have iodine to produce T3 and T4. Good food sources include meat, seafood, yogurt, milk, and eggs, as well as seaweed, Himalayan Crystal Salt and cranberries.
I’ve included a picture of an Himalayan Salt lick – which makes a good bath salt soak to supply you with the minerals you need. (it’s much cheaper than pink crystal bath salts)

If you read my blog regularly you’ll know I recommend Lugols Iodine.

Iodine alone is not enough as selenium is essential for the body to be able to break down T3 into T4. Again meat and seafood are good sources as are Brazil nuts, brown rice, seeds (Sunflower, Sesame, and Flax) and vegetables broccoli, cabbage and spinach

Gluten Dairy Omega 3
Those diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease can find their condition aggravated with the continued consumption of gluten-containing foods. The majority find improvement when off gluten and a reduced milk consumption to control their inflammation. High dose Omega 3 has had good results, report patients, in lowering inflammation, as has combined herbs such as turmeric and ginger and also Krill Oil.

More information
There is no doubt that oestrogen dominance has a role to play and many women diagnosed with low thyroid and on medication have found improvement when supplementing with bioidentical natural progesterone.
http://www.bio-hormone-health.com/2014/08/06/what-is-oestrogen-dominance/
http://www.bio-hormone-health.com/2012/05/01/how-bioidentical-natural-progesterone-helps-with-low-thyroid/

Eat Clean Train Smart Expect Results

Jax

5/5 Fat Loss Truths – Fats

5/5 Fat Loss Truths

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When it comes to fat loss nutrition, there are only five important things you need to think about.
Don’t be put off by confusing advice, expensive meal replacement schemes or slimming clubs that keep dependent on them. You need to learn how to control your own diet, gradually lose body fat and keep it off for good! No more rebound weight gain. EVER!

5th – to support your metabolism, gradually replace your bad fats with healthy ones.
Adding coconut and olive oil, avocados, raw nuts, raw seeds, and fish oils rich in Omega 3 and even grass fed butter will speed metabolism and you’ll lose more fat than ever before.
For your next meal add healthy fats – dress cooked foods with olive oil, roast your veg with coconut oil or add avocado to your salad, wraps, soups and shakes.

Hope you enjoyed this little series – losing body fat doesn’t have to be as difficult as many people would have you believe.

Jax

Fats! Which Ones?

Fats! Which One?

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Through the 90’s the food fad was low fat, sadly even though it didn’t work as a weight loss plan, the diet industry began to produce lots of low fat foods, the rest of food manufacturers followed along.
Press releases and magazine articles based on them re-in forced the idea that at was bad.
Our NHS took evidence from studies, which were faulty, miss-interpreted and at worst, misleading. For years the general public have been told to avoid saturated fats, red meat and butter, even eggs and dairy! This 30 or 40 year experiment has failed, miserably! Hopefully you will see that saturates aren’t the only issue, you have to consider how you’ll use it, how it was produced and how it’s been stored.

From the early 90’s in the UK Queen of the low fat diet, Rosemary Connelly, jumped on board and the spiral into illness and an obese population was on it’s way. To this day many people think low fat is the best way to avoid CHD, Stroke, High Blood Pressure and elevated Cholesterol. Of course this cannot be true – as dietary fat, especially saturated fat will not always effect your cholesterol level. Just as cholesterol levels will not always lead to heart disease and stroke.

Now, times are changing. More and more people are realizing the importance of fat in the diet – good fat that is.

When adding fat into your diet plan, which you should do to maintain optimal health, you must choosing the correct sources.

Chosen unwisely, fat will not only contribute to a body weight and composition problem, but it could put your health at stake as well.

I really want to help you forget all the Lo fat nonsense of the last 30 years and re- learn what your grand parents knew – how to make meals from real food, to eat meat, dairy, fresh vegetables and enjoy very occasional sweet/fatty treats.

So, let’s talk about FATS…..

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Fish Oil – The King Of Fats

If there’s one type of dietary fat that you definitely want to be taking in, omega fatty acids are it. Omega fats, which are commonly found in fatty sources of fish (such as salmon and sardines), walnuts, and flaxseeds (along with fish oil supplements), are going to ensure that your body grows and develops as it should be.

These fats are considered essential because your body will not produce them on its own so without an intake through the diet, you’re going to be falling short.

Furthermore, omega-3 fatty acids can help to prevent a number of different diseases including arthritis, heart disease and some forms of cancer all while helping to keep your cholesterol level in check.

Omega fats, in a ratio of 1:1 Omega3 to Omega 6, can also boost your level of insulin sensitivity, which will go a long way towards encouraging a leaner overall body composition.

You should avoid adding Omega 6 as they are linked to increased inflammation.

Olive Oil – A Secret Of The Mediterranean Diet

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If you’ve ever heard of the Mediterranean diet approach before, you know that at the heart of it is olive oil. People of this area consume diets that are very rich on olive oil and suffer some of the lowest rates of health issues worldwide.

Olive oil is known as an unsaturated fat and will not only prevent heart disease, but also help to keep cholesterol levels in a healthy range and ward off cancer.

It’s essential that you don’t heat olive oil over its smoke point (around 210C) however, as this can cause it to break down and produce free radicals that will then damage your health.

I like to use Olive Oil as a dressing to already cooked food – that way you get the goodness, the flavour and no nasties.

Coconut Oil – The Hidden Healthy Fat

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Another fat that must be mentioned is coconut oil. Most people would recognize this as an unhealthy fat as it’s considered to be of the saturated variety. But don’t be fooled, coconut oil is actually a very healthy and is considered a medium chain fatty acid. These fatty acids react differently in the body than most and can actually be broken down and used as a fuel source immediately rather than being stored directly as body fat tissue like longer chain fatty acids are, which are found in plant based oils. ( avoid ALL plant based fats- margarine, cooking oils etc).

Adding coconut oil to your daily diet can help to increase your metabolic rate and promote faster overall weight loss, so if you’re serious about getting lean, get some and use it.
It also has anti-fungal properties, can help to enhance your energy level and endurance, and also offers antioxidant support.

I cook with coconut oil all the time as it can be heated to high temperatures without harming the oil. You cab even buy oil that’s has no coconut flavour; however I find when cooking meats the coconut flavour can be a great addition.

It makes a great moisturiser too – visit your local West Indian or Asian store for great bargain prices compared to Supermarkets.

Canola Oil – The Fat On Your Banned List

Finally, to finish off our discussion of fats, we must make note of one that you should be avoiding at all costs – canola oil. The issue with canola oil is that it’s heavily processed and contains trans fatty acids, which are extremely detrimental to your health and well-being.

The body has absolutely no requirement for these trans fats and you should eliminate them from your diet altogether.

In addition to this, canola oil is very unstable when under heat, light, and pressure, and can cause oxidization to take place, creating free radicals in the body. This then puts you at risk for a wide number of diseases including cancer, heart disease, and may also lead to a greater likelihood of weight gain.

So, I’d like you to check your pantry – remove all vegetable oils and spreads, margarine and low fat sprays. Then replace them with olive oil for dressings, coconut oil for cooking and real – grass fed- butter for everything else!

Eat Better – Feel Better

Like this post? Follow my blog, thanks Jax

Day 14 New Year New You : Which Fish Oil? How Much? Which Omega?

Fish Oils – How Much and Which One?

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Q: How much fish oil should I take?

A: Our general recommendations are to aim for around 2-4 grams of EPA/DHA per day. However, if you eat lots of wild-caught salmon, grass-fed beef and other natural sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and generally avoid sources of omega-6 (like vegetable oils, factory-farmed meat, nuts and seeds), you may not need any fish oil supplementation at all.

Q. When should I increase the dosage?

A. If you’re diet isn’t too good, you’re overweight, you’re recovering from injury or illness then increase the factor in your calculation.

Q. What is the dosage calculator?

A. Generally we recommend you take between 0.5 – 1g EHA & DHA per every 10lbs of body weight. So, if you’re (an overweight) 200lbs you would need 20 X 0.75g in even amounts with food through each day.

Q: Are there any contraindications for taking fish oil?

A: Because fish oil capsules have an effect on reducing the stickiness of platelets, it is recommended that if you have any of the following conditions, that you see your physician to discuss whether you should take fish oil capsules:

-You have a bleeding tendency

-You are on blood thinning medications

-You are about to have surgery

Of course, before starting any new medication or supplement, it is always a smart idea to consult your physician, right?

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Q: I’m pretty inflamed/sick/overweight. Can I take more than you recommend to jump-start results?

A: Hear us clearly – you can’t fish oil your way out of poor dietary choices, lack of sleep, over-training or any combination of the above. It’s of the utmost important that you get your dietary and lifestyle house in order! More fish oil is not better – and in some instances, can do more harm than good. So make better food choices, get to bed earlier, allow yourself more time to rest and recover and do your best to minimize stress – and don’t rely on any pill or supplement to fix your stuff.

Q: Where do Omega-3 fatty acids come from?

A: Omega-3 fatty acids are found in the green leaves of plants, like grass, phytoplankton, algae and seaweed. This is the food that OUR food is designed to eat, which makes grass-fed beef, pastured organic eggs, and most importantly, certain types of fish (wild-caught fish and fish lower on the food chain, like herring, anchovy, sardine and mackerel) are good, natural sources of omega-3′s. Unfortunately, due to poor meat quality, and over-consumption of fast foods, processed foods, and vegetable oils, most of our diets are lacking in these essential fatty acids (and overly rich in pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids).

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Q: Why do I need EPA and DHA?

A: You only need a quick web search for this one, because there is a wealth of information on this subject. Fish oil is not a magic bullet, but there are an infinite number of well-documented benefits for a whole host of lifestyle diseases and conditions. The short answer is that EPA and DHA are specific types of polyunsatured omega-3 fatty acids. Your body cannot produce these fatty acids – you must get them from the food you eat, or via supplementation. EPA and DHA are natural anti-inflammatory agents, and as such, play a role in brain health, heart health, protection against cancer, Alzheimer’s and depression, improvement of skin conditions like psoriasis and acne, fetal brain development, inflammatory bowel disorders, and arthritis, to name a few.

Our typical diets are rich in another type of pro-inflammatory polyunsaturated fatty acid called omega-6. When our dietary intake of omega-6′s far exceeds our intake of omega-3′s, our bodies experience a wide range of negative consequences, all with the underlying cause of increased systemic inflammation. Minimizing dietary intake of omega-6 fatty acids, and supplementing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, helps to reduce inflammation, and the wide range of downstream effects.

Q: Is there an ideal EPA to DHA ratio?

A: This isn’t particularly important – but a supplement in the general neighborhood of 1:1 would be a good find. DHA converts to EPA easier than vice versa, so if you had to choose, choose a high-DHA oil.

Like this post? Follow my blog.

Thanks Jax

The TRUTH About Bacon

The TRUTH About Bacon

When people today think of bacon, they think of clogged arteries, love handles, and sin.
But is that right – eating bacon means that you’re destined for heart disease, a fat belly, and a lifetime on heart meds and endless visits to your GP.

But, thinking this way is a terrible misconception. In truth, bacon is a very good addition to your diet, and should be something enjoyed more often than you indulge in toast and jam, porridge and honey.

Bacon is not an unhealthy food when chosen correctly. By reading this article, you’ll learn why and how to properly add bacon to your diet.

What Is Bacon?

Bacon is a cured meat usually from the pig, naturally treated to prevent the meat from going off using salt, and often nitrites. It also includes natural fat (known as lard).

Bacon usually comes from either the belly of the pig, the back, or the sides. The amount of fat (lard) in bacon depends on how fat the pig is, with the belly usually being fattier than the back. Most traditional breeds lay down more fat if intensively fed.  Free range pigs tend to be less fat.

Today, you can also find bacon made from turkey. But if you read the label of turkey bacon, it contains a laundry list of ingredients, many of which are not good for you such as hydrolysed corn gluten, soy protein, wheat gluten, disodium inosinate, silicon dioxide and nitrites.

Europeans Have It Right

All over Germany, pork reigns supreme. From bacon to sausage to lard – no part of the pig is left unused. And, if you take a good look at traditional Germans, you will notice that they are not as overweight as many of us in the UK, nor suffer the same incidences of chronic disease.

Many Europeans still use lard for most of their baking and cooking. We also used to incorporate a lot of lard into our daily diets, but then our government started telling us that pig fat was too “saturated” and unhealthy, so, we shifted to the use of hydrogenated plant oils (aka., vegetable fat) which actually made us sicker, fatter, and more diseased.

 

Why Bacon is Better

To understand why bacon, and the fat it’s rich in (lard), is a healthy choice for us to use in our diets along with other beneficial fats and proteins, let’s look at the nutritional science of this food.

If we take 1 tablespoon of pure lard, we see that is consists of an even balance of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, with some polyunsaturates and cholesterol (all animal fats contain cholesterol – remember not ALL cholesterol is bad!), but no trans fats.

Specifically Lard contains*:

• 5.9 grams of saturated fatty acids
• 6.4 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 2 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (mostly omega-6)
• 14 mg cholesterol
*analysis from Mass Spectrometry at University of Alberta, 2003

Vegetable shortening contains**:

• 3.8 grams saturated fatty acids
• 6.7 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 3.9 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (most omega-6)
• 2 grams trans fatty acids (man-made)
• 0 mg cholesterol
**analysis from ESHA Food Processor

These trans fats found in this man-made, fake lard substitute, have now been linked directly to heart disease, morbidity and mortality, and there is a strong move to rid our shelves of this dangerous fat as soon as possible. You should NEVER consume trans fats EVER!

Saturated Fat is Not Bad

Some people still think saturated fats are evil, and as a result have banned bacon from their homes. However, fat experts today emphasize that saturated fat from natural sources like meats, dairy, and tropical oils (coconut, palm) are not detrimental for our health, but instead much better than the polyunsaturated and hydrogenated substitutes we’ve been using in recent years.

I can hear you saying ‘ Here we go, yet more conflicting information’ it can be confusing to tell yourself that saturated fat isn’t bad like we once thought. However, it’s important that you realize we have been fed bad advice and processed foods that have only made us fatter, sicker, and unhealthy. We need to change this way of thinking.

The bottom line is that saturated fats, like that found in bacon, CAN and SHOULD fit into a healthy diet – a diet low in sugar, processed carbohydrates, and synthetic chemicals, but high in fresh low-pesticide vegetables, organic meats and fish, and nuts and seeds.

Essential Omega-6 and Omega-3 Balance

What about the omega-6 fats in bacon? Some people feel that bacon and other foods containing omega-6 polyunsaturated fats should be minimized, and a focus placed on omega-3 fats such as fish, flax, and certain nuts – which is both true and untrue.

It is correct that we should try to keep a fairly close balance between the omega-6 fats (found in most meats and some nuts and seeds) and the omega-3 fats, but we can’t completely eliminate omega-6s in favour of omega-3s.

Your body needs omega-6s because they are ESSENTIAL – meaning necessary for proper metabolic and physiologic function.
It’s more important to maintain a healthy ratio of omega-6 fats found in foods like bacon, with omega-3 fats found in DHA-enriched eggs (those fed with extra rations of linseeds) and omega-3 rich fish.

For example, a great breakfast combination would be a few slices of bacon with omega-3 DHA eggs topped with organic salsa and avocado. Delicious and nutritious!

The Science of Bacon Fat

In 2003, a research study at the University of Alberta, USA looking at the effects of a high bacon fat diet vs. a high palm oil diet had on the cholesterol levels and inflammation profiles of ten healthy men.

The men were given meals like:

• (BLLTs) Bacon, Lettuce, Lard and Tomato sandwiches
• Hash Browns cooked in lard
• Bacon and Egg Omelets cooked in lard

After 6 weeks on each diet, their blood was analysed for cholesterol synthesis rates, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations, and markers of inflammation.

What was found was that the high lard diet compared to the high palm oil diet produced significantly lower total cholesterol, and total-cholesterol/HDL cholesterol levels, with slightly lower LDL-cholesterol and inflammatory marker levels.

What this means is that fat from lard may be less harmfull and inflammatory than fat from palm oil. This does not mean that palm oil is a bad fat, but instead suggests that lard may be better when consumed often.

Choosing Healthy Bacon

Now that you know that the fat in bacon is not bad for you, or harmful for your health, don’t immediately go out and purchase bacon and eat it everyday.

First, you need to look for bacon that is nitrite-free.

Nitrite (sodium nitrite) is a preservative used in bacon to not only prevent spoilage, but also keep bacon a nice red colour.

However, nitrite is also a known carcinogen and is related to increased risk and incidences of cancer.

So, if you do decide to choose bacon to help you either stick to a lower carbohydrate diet, or just eat instead of toast and jam, make sure you choose wisely – natural nitrite free bacon is the best.

With bacon, you don’t have to worry about the pig being full of artificial or natural growth hormones, because these are not allowed to be used on pigs.

Eat a Better Breakfast

Now you know that bacon is a good breakfast food, but it can also be used to enhance the taste of your favourite salads for lunch, or as a side dish at dinner.

No matter what you choose to do with your diet, bacon or not, remember that bacon is not bad for you, and will not ruin your health. Also, when eaten in the context of a low-sugar, unprocessed diet, it will not make you as fat as a pig!

Enjoy!

 

Which Omega ? Is Omega 6 Good for Me?

Food Rule #3.   anothwer 17 rules on their way…..

Most people need to be more aware of the omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio of the food they eat. The ancestral human diet of the Paleolithic era appears that it had a ratio of approximately 1:1 to 2:1 omega-6 fats to omega-3 fats. The current average western diet contains anywhere from 20:1 to 30:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats. This is a major problem and one of the causes of degenerative diseases.

In order to balance this out better, you need to AVOID corn oils, soybean oils, cottonseed oils (or anything cooked in these oils), and minimize grain-fed meats and farmed fish that were fed grains. Instead, focus on wild fish, grass-fed meats, grass-fed dairy, free-range eggs, as well as other foods that can help you get more omega-3’s like chia seeds, walnuts, hemp seeds, and fish oil and/or krill oil, which are vitally important sources of DHA and EPA. I personally take both fish oil and krill oil, as the fish oil has a larger quantity of DHA and EPA (and more omega-3 volume overall), while the krill oil has more antioxidant benefits from the astaxanthin and a higher absorption rate than the fish oil.  Capsule Krill Oil is easy to source, and Fish Oils can be added to smoothies and shakes – remember good quality oils WON’T make your burps fishy!!

Take note that animal sources of omega-3 fats are MUCH more powerful to your health than plant sources of omega-3’s like walnuts, chia, and flax. This is because animal sources of omega-3’s already contain DHA and EPA already converted whereas plant sources don’t, and your body is very ineffecient at converting plant sources of omega-3 fats to DHA and EPA.

Sorry, vegetarians – but its true….

Jax xx