Pre-Stretch – Dont Bother!

Pre-Stretch – Dont Bother!

Stretching before working out actually weakens your muscles by 30%.
Pre-game stretching could actually increase your risk of injury.
No study I’ve found has shown pre-stretching (before a workout) has ever prevented an injury!

You are better off doing your stretching after a workout; try lifting some light weights to warm up, or doing a little walking before cardio.

I always consider that my clients have dressed, travelled, changed, arrived in my studio – so pretty warm and ready to go…. A little muscle activation, core work and practise of any complex movements planned for that day will prepare you and help you focus well enough.

How Many Calories Should You Eat for Your Sport?

SUNDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) — With the New York City Marathon just two weeks away, a sports diet expert advises runners that proper nutrition and hydration are crucial for anyone training for the Nov. 3 race.

20131023-114734.jpg

Long-distance runners are at risk for low bone density, stress fractures and irregular periods, so it’s important for them to provide their bodies with enough energy to achieve peak performance and prevent injuries, said Brooke Schantz, a registered dietitian and board-certified specialist in sports dietetics at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill.

She offers this simple way for runners to calculate their caloric needs:

Between 30 and 60 minutes of activity a day requires 16 to 18 calories per pound of body weight.
One to one and a half hours of activity a day requires 19 to 21 calories per pound.
One and a half to two hours of activity a day requires 22 to 24 calories per pound.
Two to three hours of activity a day requires 25 to 30 or more calories per pound.
It’s also a good idea to consult a registered dietitian for a tailored nutrition plan, Schantz said.

Some of her other suggestions:

Avoid high-fiber foods the night before and the morning of the race. Eating these types of foods — such as high-fiber cereals, grains, granola bars, fruits and vegetables — could result in intestinal distress and cramping on race day.

Monitor your sweat loss and weigh yourself before and after long runs. For every pound lost during a run, replace it with 16 ounces of water. Monitoring urine color is a good way to assess hydration levels. The clearer your urine, the more hydrated you are.

Consume 30 to 60 grams of carbohydrates every hour when exercising more than one hour. They can be consumed on the move in different forms, including gels, jelly beans, sports drinks, sports bars or a combination thereof.

Carbohydrate loading before a marathon can help improve performance. Some carbo-loading plans start six days before a race, but even beginning a high-carb diet the day before the race can help maintain a high-intensity run.

Protein also is important for increasing lean muscle mass and aiding in muscle repair. Endurance athletes require 1.2 to 1.4 grams for every 2.2 pounds per day.

Be sure to practice a nutrition and hydration schedule ahead of the marathon. Race day is not the time to try out new foods and beverages.

#2 Fitness Myth Fail : Stretching Pre workout

20130529-084824.jpg

Yet another published almost truth!
It’s been known since the early 90’s that Pre exercise stretching does not prevent injuries.
It’s also accepted that stretching a cold muscle is worse for performance than not stretching at all.
What benefit do we get from stretching? It allows an instructor to observe and evaluate a client.
Dynamic stretches are a great way to warmup before a workout, when done properly.

So, here is the myth – as is- followed by my comments…..
…………………………………………………………
#2 Myth: Stretch Before You Work Out
Stretching before working out actually weakens your muscles by 30%. Pre-game stretching could actually increase your risk of injury. You are better off doing your stretching after a workout; try lifting some light weights to warm up, or doing a little walking before cardio.

…………………………………………………………..
Post Exercise stretching – always a sensible part of your workout. To allow your muscles to return to their Pre-exercise condition/length. Longer, held stretches to increase flexibility and support joint mobility must be a good ides.

Using light weights to warm-up should only EVER follow a series of mobility exercises. It’s a good idea to practise your chosen routine with a reduced load – but just picking up light weights and going for it is poor preparation – unless of course your workouts are not really that challenging.

5 Fitness Myths Busted

5 Fitness Myths Busted.

Myth #1: Crunches and Sit Ups & Curl Ups Help Bust Belly Fat

 

TRUTH: While exercises that target the abdomen can help tone and strengthen the muscles near your belly, they won’t make that paunch go away on their own. The human body doesn’t get rid of fat just in certain areas; when you exercise, fat loss is a full-body phenomenon. To reduce belly fat, focus on intense cardio workouts, supplemented by resistance training (which doesn’t have to include core exercises like crunches). And most importantly, fix your nutrition!

Myth #2: Women Should Stick to Light Weights to Avoid Bulking Up

 

TRUTH: The vast majority of women simply don’t have enough testosterone in their bodies to build the Arnold-like muscle mass that some want to avoid. In fact, lifting heavy weights, working with resistance bands and even body weight in suspension trainers will help women lose weight, gain increased definition, and build confidence.

Myth #3: Sweat is a Good Indicator of How Hard You’re Working

 

TRUTH: While a sweat-soaked t-shirt might make you feel super satisfied after a tough workout, there’s really no relationship between how much you sweat and how hard you’re working. So, next time you’re at the gym? Consider leaving that 90s style sweat suit at home.  Keep you’re sweating for the Turkish and Sauna after your workout.

Myth #4 : No pain, No Gain

 

TRUTH: There’s a big difference between pain and discomfort, says Michael Lagomarsine, an expert based out of Boston University’s Athletic Enhancement Center.

While you may have some muscle soreness after a particularly hard workout, anything that actively hurts while you’re doing it could be causing you damage. Extreme muscle pain for more than two or three days after a workout likely indicates that you worked at an intensity you are not used to – keep moving and don’t wait too long for your next workout. Your body is busy adapting, getting stronger and fitter, make sure you sleep and eat well to get the best results.

Myth #5: Stretching Before a Workout Helps Prevent Injuries

TRUTH: Multiple studies have found that stretching before a workout actually does nothing to prevent injuries. In fact, those who stretch before a run actually tend to wind up with more injuries than those who don’t.

I’ve been quoting these studies since the late 80’s, Don’t stretch a cold muscle ever!

 

Stretching after exercising seems to be the best option for those who want to avoid delayed onset muscle soreness.  That’s the soreness that kicks in 2 – 3 days after a workout. Instead of using stretches before a workout,  I include mobility to loosen joints, dynamic movements that focus on preparation for the exercises to follow.  I often use a series of plank exercises to create muscle heat and improve core strength to get off to a good start.

 

Myth #6: Low Intensity Cardio Burns Fat Best

TRUTH: You’re probably familiar with the “fat burn” zone on your favourite piece of cardio equipment, but there’s no proof that these zones are effective for fat burning. The idea that lower intensity cardio is better than high intensity cardio when it comes to losing weight is incorrect. When you stop your moderate cardio training your calories burning stops too. That’s why you pile the weight back on when you stop training or go on holiday!

According to exercise specialist and fitness author Tom Holland, fat loss is all about burning calories, and the more intense your workout, the more calories you’ll burn during your exercise and for up to 3 days after it’s finished.

 

Myth #7: Weight Machines Are Safer Than Free Weights.

 

TRUTH: This myth may actually put you at a higher risk for injury. Many gym enthusiasts stick to weight machines rather than learning how to use free weights, because they believe that the machine will correct their form and ensure that they don’t hurt themselves.

But there are still tons of ways you can use a weight machine that can damage your muscles and joints, from height and length adjustment to using weights that are too heavy to using the wrong muscle groups to push or pull. Whether you choose to use free weights or weights machines make sure you have a qualified trainer show you the ropes before you get started.

 

What other fitness myths have you heard that need to be busted?

 

Sources:

 

for daily tweets, news articles, hints & tips and recipe ideas….

follow me on Twitter  @JaxAllenFitness

friend me on Facebook  Jax Allen

blog  http://www.jaxallenfitness.com