Beetroot Cherries & Caffeine

http://www.creators.com/Beetroot Juice May Be a Better Sports Drink

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This article continues from the TV program last Monday evening about Beetroot juice and the research done at Coventry university in the UK.
For an energy boost during and to reduce muscle soreness after hard exercise beetroot juice shots and maybe Cherry juice are the way to go.
There’s also an update on caffeine, however I prefer the non- stimulant route.
Go over and visit the site to read the article.

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Are so-called sports drinks making you fat?

Are so-called sports drinks making you fat?

Carb-dense sports drinks are an increasingly common sight in the gym – but are they doing you more harm than good, asks Ross Edgley
(Article from Men’s Health – it’s a good one)

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This is why I don’t tell my clients to use pre- exercise drinks or post exercise sugary sports drinks… Just a recovery carb and protein shake or meal in the magic recovery window for best fat lost and recovery results.

Sports drinks are the liquid of choice for elite athletes. We see them in perfectly polished adverts, sipping from their ‘bottled fitness’, and treat their lean physiques as beacons of inspiration for us average gym dwellers.
So on what grounds are researchers from Harvard Medical School claiming that the exact same drinks are responsible for making people fat? It seems almost contradictory: surely sports drinks don’t make you put on the pounds?

The answer lies in a category error. Carbohydrate-dense sports drink formulas were originally created to fuel the hours of intense training professional athletes subject themselves to. We’re talking about regular and sustained exertion – and not a 40-minute spin on the treadmill designed to burn off the weekend’s indulgences.

But advertising is a powerful thing, and as we’ve increasingly turned to the gym to counteract our sedentary lifestyles, so too have we collided the idea of fitness success with sports drinks and those pictures of professional athletes. Lucozade Sport and Powerade may be intended for elite athletes, but they’re now frequently seen next to the treadmill at the office gym.

Should your gym bag contain a sports drink or not? Put simply, if you’re training for Olympic Gold, then yes. But if you’re sole aim is to lose the fat accumulated in daily life, the answer, according to research published in the American Journal of Applied Physiology, is an emphatic no.
Related Articles

Jax.

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Sports drinks are typically high in carbohydrates, so they provide athletes with an efficient source of energy. The problem for those looking to lose the blubber is that carbs cause a rise in the hormone known as insulin, which limits the rate at which you burn fat.
To test this theory, researchers from the University of Texas monitored the impact that ingesting carbohydrates had on people’s ability to burn fat during exercise. They took six healthy, active men and had them complete 60 minutes of cycling in a fasted state — waking up and training without breakfast — and one hour after ingesting 0.8g of carbohydrates per kilogram of body weight. The results were conclusive: “Small elevations in plasma insulin before exercise suppress lipolysis (fat loss) during exercise to the point at which it equals and appears to limit fat oxidation (burning fat).”

The Texas study isn’t the only research to suggest that carbs plus exercise don’t equal fat loss. Scientists from the Department of Human Biology at the University of Limburg in the Netherlands similarly found that carbohydrates interfere with the body’s process for burning fat.

They support the idea that forgoing a pre-workout sports drink gives your body a hormonal fat burning advantage.

But the bad news doesn’t stop there. As well as hindering your efforts in the gym, sports drinks can also make you more prone to storing fat. That’s according to researchers from the Department of Food and Nutrition at Purdue University, who discovered liquid carbohydrates add more calories to the diet because they have a lower satiating effect compared to solid foods. Essentially, people are naively drinking litres of this ‘liquid fitness’ without accounting for the additional carbohydrates and calories in their regular diet.

Now, at this point it’s worth making it clear that sports drinks aren’t the devil’s water – far from it, as long as you’re interested in performance. Nutrition for performance is very different to nutrition for fat loss, and carb-heavy drinks can help fuel endurance efforts, allowing the body to go harder for longer

Just ask scientists from Loughborough University, who wanted to measure the impact a carbohydrate sports drink has on running performance. They took seven experienced endurance runners and had them complete two 30km road races, once with a 250ml sports drink and once with tap water. After monitoring blood lactate and other biological markers they concluded: “Performance time for a 30km road race is improved after ingesting a 5pc carbohydrate solution.”
Sports drinks also aid strength and power athletes who want to shift iron in the gym. Researchers from the University of Queensland subjected athletes to a two-day carbohydrate restricted diet to see if it had an impact on strength. What they found was a carbohydrate restriction program caused a “significant reduction in the number of squat repetitions performed.” Put simply, limiting your carbs in the kitchen can also limit your performance in the weights room.

And what about the guy who hits the treadmill for 40 minutes on Monday morning and then hangs his shoes up for the rest of the week? Well, the research suggests that sports drinks shouldn’t be on his banned substance list – as long as they’re consumed after the run. Scientists have found that consuming carbohydrates in the first 30 to 60 minutes after training can help replenish muscle glycogen and kick-start the entire recovery process. In its post-exercise state, the body effectively becomes a sponge, soaking up all the carbs you have earned on the treadmill and putting them to good use by sending them to the muscles to aid recovery.

All things considered, sports drinks are great if you’re an athlete and know how to use them properly.

But if your goal is to lose fat then don’t be fooled by the glossy, inspirational adverts which come complete with a professional athlete and his washboard abs.

Instead ditch the energy-rich sports drink until at least after the gym and visit the water fountain instead.

http://www.jaxallenfitness.com

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Improve Your Sport With Yoga -2

2. Yoga move Better

YOGA WILL HELP YOU GET BETTER AT YOUR SPORT!

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Metabolic resistance training is the surest way to blast fat and simultaneously gain strength and lean muscle. But strength training can also make muscles tight, and without focused flexibility your body can begin to move inefficiently due to limited range of motion.

When your body moves freely, you will actually be able to recruit more muscles, increasing power output—which means more fat loss. The more you can incorporate your entire body through movement, the more your metabolism will benefit as a result.

But honestly, who has time to stretch?! Stretching is boring, and most of us would rather spend our time hitting the weights and getting a sweat on.

Even when you make time for stretching though, if done incorrectly stretching can actually prove useless. Which means the time that you’re setting aside for stretching is actually a complete waste of time, plus if you’re cold or use bad technique you may tighten up even more.

Yoga will naturally stretch your muscles and mobilize your joints by flowing through a variety of poses. Plus, you get to do so while also doing some pretty fun and challenging things with your body. With this increased mobility, your body will be able to move more efficiently, ensuring that when you lift weights you’ll actually recruit more muscles and burn more fat while you’re at it.

I include gravity stretches where you don’t ‘try’ to stretch at all – these are more about getting into position and letting your body weight and gravity do the work.

These are a VERY effective way to get a permanent change in the active length of tight muscles.

Try our Hot Yoga @ Trojan Free Fighters
Sundays 11:00. £6 per session.

Jax.

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A few reasons shoulder joints are injured in training

A few reasons shoulder joints are injured in training

1. The shoulder joints rely on muscles to support them and that means you must have good strength balance and symmetry anterior to posterior. Unfortunately most fitness enthusiasts only work the front of the shoulder and forget that the back (posterior) of the shoulders is the real deal.

2. Shoulders have the greatest range of motion in the body. As a result when someone loses 25%, it can go unnoticed. However lose 25% of motion in your low back, hip or elbow and you lose big time function. No different in the shoulder except that without noticing the loss, compensate in other areas which is when the problems begin.

3. Rotation and your thoracic spine is where you really help your shoulders out. The problem is very few people train the shoulder in a rotational plane. Therefore the thoracic spine eventually gets tight. Loss of thoracic spine mobility means the shoulder has to do more rotating. Not a good thing for the shoulder long term.

4. The shoulder is a joint that must have a strong integration between the pelvis, trunk, scapular and shoulder joint in order to function successfully and stay healthy. This is lost if all strength training is done in isolation without the other areas getting involved. A shoulder that plays alone is not a happy shoulder.

5. Keeping the Scapula (shoulder blade) stable and mobile is a great place to start protecting the shoulder joint and rotator cuff. Making sure the scapula is loaded before pulling movements are performed is how you get the scapula on board instantly. Performing movements that do not require full ranges of motion is essentially informing the scapula that he is not needed.

1. Don’t always choose just 1 or 2 movements. Hit the shoulders using 4 to 5 different movement variations in a workout

2. Constantly change your base of support to get you pelvis thinking when training – especially easy with bands.

3. Don’t go directly overhead with pressing. Allow your arms to follow a more real life, scapular plane – a sweeping arc – out, up and forward.

4. Work the posterior (back) shoulder twice as much as the anterior (front) shoulder. And Yes… chest training iIS anterior shoulder training. It’s really easy to get the posterior shoulder training with bands

5. Make the thoracic spine rotate by performing unilateral (1 side) training with the shoulders not just bilateral all the time.

6. Anytime you can reinforce getting a good scapular retraction with downward rotation… Go For it. PACK UR SHOULDER BLADES DOWN.

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Why Crossfit May NOT Be Good For You

Why Crossfit May Not Be Good For You

I found this and thought you should have a read….. a few interesting points about who Crossfit is aimed at, how hard you should train and do the coaches have enough training?  Anyone can ‘Beast’ a client  not many can ‘Coach’ clients……

This discussion seems to make sense to me – Coach Boyle is very respected in his field and in the industry as a whole.

 

Michael Boyle
                       

Crossfit gyms are springing up all over the world. They are cheap and easy to open, with only a weekend certification and a few thousand dollars worth of equipment. This appeals to many in the fitness business. You can be part of a rapidly growing trend and you can do it without great expense. I am not a Crossfit fan so some might view this piece as yellow journalism. I will try to keep my personal opinions to myself and deal with what is generally agreed upon as safe in strength and conditioning.

First, a little background. To be honest, I knew very little about Crossfit until I was contacted by representatives of SOMA, the Special Operations Medical Association, in 2005. Crossfit was their concern, not mine. I was asked to come to the SOMA meeting in Tampa, Florida to discuss training special operations soldiers. At a panel discussion in 2005 I offered answers to questions asked about Crossfit and the controversy began. What follows is not from the SOMA meeting but, my thoughts since.

Major Question 1- Is planned randomization a valid concept. Crossfit is based on the idea that the workouts are planned but deliberately random. I think that the term planned randomization is an oxymoron. Workouts are either planned or random. I believe strongly that workouts should be planned and that a specific progression should be followed to prevent injury.

I sometimes plan sessions that relate to each other week to week – but not Day to Day – is this also planned randomisation.

But seriously, I know what Coach Boyle means. To be effective programmes should gradually build in frequency, intensity, duration and type of training, over the short and very long term.

 

Major Question 2- Is Training to Failure Safe? Because Crossfit is, at it’s heart, a competitive or self-competitive program it becomes necessary to train to failure. There are two layers or problem here. One is the simple question of whether training to failure is beneficial to the trainee. Some strength and conditioning experts believe training to failure is beneficial, others caution against. I must admit that I like training to failure.

However, this brings up the larger question of what constitutes failure. Strength and Conditioning Coach Charles Poliquin (another non-Crossfit fan) popularized the term “technical failure” and, this is the definition that we adhere to.

Technical failure occurs not when the athlete or client is no longer capable of doing the exercise but, when the athlete or client can no longer do the exercise with proper technique. In training beyond technical failure the stress shifts to tissues that were not, and probably should not, be the target of the exercise. The third layer of the training to failure question relates to what movements lend themselves to training to failure. In the area of “generally agreed as safe”, high velocity movements like Olympic lifts and jumps are not generally done to failure and never should be taken beyond technical failure. Is it one bad rep versus multiple bad reps? How many bad reps is too many?

It seems mad to train beyond the point of having good form (therefore safe execution of the exercise)

 

Major Question 3- Is an overuse injury (generally an injury caused by repeated exposure to light loads), different from an overstress injury (an injury caused by exposure to heavy loads). Both are injuries.

The first is overuse, the second is trauma. In my mind injuries are injuries, period.

I agree – I am always looking for ways to include mobilisations to improve movement patterns, prepare for training and get more value out of the warm-up/prep phase of every workout.  My 5 week programme gives us a chance to really focus on muscle balance, injury prevention, 3 Dimension training and recovery.

 

Major Question 4- Should adults be Olympic lifters? I don’t think that Olympic lifts are for all adults. Most adults can’t get their arms safely over their head once much less fifty times with load. The other question that begs to be asked is should anyone do high rep Olympic lifts. I know the best Olympic lifters in the world say no. With all that said believe it or not my biggest problem is actually less with the actual workouts than it is with the false bravado and character assassination of dissenters. The community can be pretty venomous when you question Coach Glassman.

 

The Crossfit community is also filled with people who tell you that injury is a normal part of the training process. I have spoken up against endurance athletes who willingly hurt themselves and to me, this is no difference than the current Crossfit controversy. I know that this will generate more controversy but, Crossfit might be the biggest controversy in strength and conditioning since HIT training.

I use HIIT as a method in some programs….

Quite different to HIT.

HIT is High Intensity Training, HIIT is High Intensity Interval Training….  I can vary the interval to build endurance before I progress the load/weigh Intensity to improve strength.

This way, beginners can work alongside experienced clients without fear of injury or embarrassment!

 

 

Hope this will encourage you to question training methods and the quality of the ‘coaching’ available to you.

 

Jax Allen Fitness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refresh & Renew Your Muscles After Training

Refresh & Renew Your Muscles After Training

 

Help avoid injuries and speed recovery with this regeneration routine

 

ATR Active Tissue Releases will improve your muscle tissue quality, banish trigger points, knots and tightness.

 

  Exercise Kit   Reps/Time
1 Arch Rolls Golf Ball Left / Right 30 secs
2 Quads / Hip Flexor Foam Roll Left/Right 30 secs
3 Adductor Foam Roll Left/Right 30 secs
4 Hamstring Foam Roll Left/Right 30 secs
5 I T Band Foam Roll Left/Right 30 secs
6 Quad/Hip Flexor

Kneeling back foot elevated

Stretch Left/Right 10
7 Hamstring

Straight Leg

Rope Stretch Left/ Right 10
8 Hamstring

Supine Bent Knee

Stretch Left/Right 10
9 I T Band / Glute

 

Rope Stretch Left/Right 10
10 Adductor Rope Stretch Left/Right 10

 

Invest some time in your recovery and you’ll train better and feel great.

 

Trigger Points & Active Tissue Release Massage

Trigger Point Movements 101

Thomas KnoxMay 24, 2012

Overview

Trigger points are hypersensitive “knots” that develop in muscles. They can be painful, even causing pain beyond the affected tender area. The action you can take to work out these kinks is called trigger point therapy, or trigger point massage—a technique you can perform on yourself at the gym or even at home.

Applying gentle pressure with a variety of tools like a massage stick, foam roll, golf ball, trigger point ball, or trigger point roller can isolate and release the so-called knots. It is also sometimes combined with a stretch for added benefit.

How It Works

A trigger point develops when a muscle is constantly being activated and then stays contracted. This could be the result of overuse, misuse, inflammation, trauma, or nerve dysfunction.

Trigger point therapy works by applying gentle pressure to the knot through massage. The pressure creates a slight stretch in the muscle, disrupting the constant activation and allowing the muscle to return to its normal resting state. Trigger point movements should feel like a deep massage.

Most trigger points will respond to this pressure. If it doesn’t, you may need to seek the help of a medical professional who can apply additional treatment like myofascial release, dry needling, or injections.

When to Do It

  • Pre-workout. You can perform trigger point movements to prepare your muscles for a training session.
  • When you’re in pain. Often times, muscle or joint pain can be the result of trigger points in the area.
  • Post-workout. After training, trigger point movements can help release tension in your muscles so they can begin the recovery process.

Coaching Keys

 

  • Maintain pressure throughout the massage.
  • The more uncomfortable it is, the more it needs to be massaged.
  • Spend more time on any sore spots that you find.