High Protein Snack Favourite

SAVOURY HIGH-PROTEIN QUINOA PANCAKESLooking for new breakfast ideas? You’ll love these savoury pancakes.


Not only easy to make, but also very versatile. You can add any ingredient you like.
You can even use them as a substitute for burger buns! Just whack a patty between two pancakes, add lettuce, tomato, onion and my healthy Aioli, voila low-carb burger!
Ingredients: (makes 5)
1 cooked full chicken breast

3 eggs

salt, pepper, tumeric powder & chili to taste

1/2 cup cooked quinoa

Method:
Using a food processor, blend all ingredients except the quiona together until completely smooth. Mixture will look just like a pancake batter.

A large tablespoonful of the mixture on a hot greased skillet and press down gently like a pancake. Sprinkle quinoa on top.

Cook for about 1 minute then flip to the other side.

Can You Snack Healthy?

There are more options than you think!!

Sometimes, the whole world of snacking seems to be based on the one thing you’re supposed to limit: refined carbs. Even the “healthier” packaged items, like granola bars, smoothies, and crackers, are full of them. If you look past the vending machine, though, you’ll find plenty of other tasty options, like these smart snacks. The best part? They’re as easy to toss together as they are delicious. 

#1 Low carb snack

Apples and Cheese

  
Sweet and salty flavors add up to a great snack. Pair half a cup of apple slices with string cheese for about 10 grams of carbs. The combination of protein, fat, and fiber makes it a filling and satisfying nosh.
#2 low carb snack

Avocado on a Crisp

  
Avocados have a place in your diet outside the guacamole bowl. Mash one-quarter of a ripe avocado and spread it on two light rye crisps for a crunchy, creamy snack with 18 grams of carbs, plus plenty of fiber and heart-healthy fat. It’s like a mini open-faced sandwich.
#3 low carb snack

Yogurt and Cucumbers
  Take your yogurt in a savory direction. Use a cup of low-fat, plain Greek yogurt as a creamy dip for 1 cup of refreshing cucumber spears. It adds up to12 grams of carbs and a mega dose (20 grams) of appetite-satisfying protein. It’s like a version of the famous Greek dish, tzatziki.

#4 low carb snack

Turkey Roll-Ups

  
Deli turkey has uses beyond a sandwich filling. Lose the bread and roll up 1 ounce of sliced turkey in lettuce leaves with mustard. This light, crisp snack has about 3 grams of carbs and will get you through the afternoon.

#5 low carb snack 

Cottage Cheese With Berries

  
Cheesecake doesn’t make for a healthy snack option, but you can mimic a little of the flavor in a healthier way. Pair a cup of low-fat cottage cheese with half a cup of fresh or frozen blueberries and a little of your favorite no-calorie sweetener. The result? A dessert-like snack with 18 grams of carbs.

#6 low carb snack

Better Beef Jerky

   
Jerky has been going upscale in recent years, and there are better options now than the over-processed mystery-meat versions you’ve had before. Look for jerkies made from grass-fed beef, which have big flavor and just 10 grams of carbs per serving (about 1.5 ounces). 

#7 low carb snack

Celery and Peanut Butter

  
Remember eating this snack with your homework after school? It’s still a good idea! Fill two medium celery stalks with 2 tablespoons of natural-style peanut butter for a nibble that will take you back to your childhood, with only 9 grams of carbs.

#8 low carb snack

Hardboiled Egg With a Kick Nuts

  
Mixed nuts are an all-time snack classic for good reason. They’re just as satisfying at your desk as they are at a party. One ounce of crunchy, salty, mixed nuts will keep your energy up for hours for only 5 grams of carbs per ounce.

Hard-boiled eggs are the original grab-‘n’-go power snack. Cut one in half and spread on a little hot sauce (such as sriracha) to make it as full of flavor as it is of protein. That’s a zesty bite for less than 1 gram of carbs.

#9 low carb snack

Nuts

  
Mixed nuts are an all-time snack classic for good reason. They’re just as satisfying at your desk as they are at a party. One ounce of crunchy, salty, mixed nuts will keep your energy up for hours for only 5 grams of carbs per ounce.

#10 low carb snack
Kale Chips

  
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.

#11 low carb snack

  
Edamame

Also called steamed soybeans, edamame taste great, are full of fiber and protein, and have just 8 grams of carbs in a half cup of shelled edamame. They’re easy to make in your microwave, so keep a bag in your freezer.

#12 low carb snack

Hummus and Red Bell Pepper Wedges

  
Though they’re often spotted together, hummus isn’t married to high-carb pita bread. Spread 1/4 cup of hummus onto wedges cut from one red bell pepper for a filling, tasty snack that has 16 grams of carbs.

#13 low carb snack 

  
Stuffed Tomato

Get the health benefits from tuna without all the carbs that come with your typical tuna sandwich. Pack 3 ounces of canned tuna into a ripe tomato half for a hearty snack with only 3.5 grams of carbs.

Growing Portions Cause Obesity!

Retailers could be forced to charge more for bigger servings to counter damage being done, say Cambridge University experts





Larger sizes are threatening people’s health by encouraging them to overeat, according to experts from Cambridge University, including the government’s chief advisor on obesity.

In a warning about the dangers of overserving, the authors calculated that ridding bigger portions from our diet would make consumers reduce their energy intake from food by 16%, and thereby help fight against obesity.

The damage caused by overserving is so great that the government may have to limit how big servings can be or force retailers to charge much more for them in an attempt to reduce consumption, the authors said. 

Ian Shemilt, who led the research, said: “At the moment it is all too easy – and often better value for money – for us to eat and drink too much. The evidence is compelling now that actions which reduce the size, availability and appeal of large servings can make a difference to the amounts people eat and drink.”

Shemilt pointed to evidence collated by the British Heart Foundation in 2013 showing that curry ready meals had expanded by 50% in the previous 20 years, as had the number of crisps in a family bag. 

An individual shepherd’s pie ready meal grew by 98%, chicken pies were 40% bigger and a meat lasagne ready meal for one had increased by 39%. 

Food campaigners said the study, published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, showed the food industry had to do more to reduce the overconsumption of calories by limiting the size of its products. 

Malcom Clark, the co-ordinator of the Children’s Food Campaign, said: “Bigger plates, bigger packs, bigger portions, bigger us. It’s nudge theory, encouraging us – like so many other prevalent marketing tactics used by the food industry – to consume far more sugar, fat and calories than we ought to, and making it much easier to do so. 

“Initiatives such as limiting chocolate bar single-serve portion size to 250 calories are a start. To counter the huge rise of sharing sizes and snacking bags, especially those aimed at children and family consumption, the government needs to take a hard look in its childhood obesity strategy at how less healthy items are marketed and at what price.”

Downing Street policy officials are drawing up the new strategy, which David Cameron is expected to launch in November. There has been sustained criticismthat the Responsibility Deal approach adopted in 2010, involving voluntary agreements with the food industry, is not countering rising childhood obesity

The authors arrived at their conclusions after examining the results of 61 previous studies, involving 6,711 participants, looking at the influence of the size of portion, packaging and tableware on how much food people eat. They include Prof Susan Jebb, who advises ministers on food and nutrition policy. 

If British consumers could avoid outsized portions, they would cut the amount of energy they get every day from food by 12%-16%, or up to 279 calories, the authors said. If American adults did the same, they could reduce their intake by 22%-29%, or a maximum of 527 calories each daily. 

Prof Brian Ratcliffe, an emeritus professor of nutrition at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, said: “This review provides evidence to support what might seem to be a self-evident truth, that serving larger portions leads to greater levels of consumption, and the effect seems to be more pronounced in adults than children.

“Presumably related to a lack of effective self-restraint, people seem to be reluctant to leave or waste food and so consume what they are served or find larger portions more attractive.” 

More restaurants and fast-food premises should follow the lead set by the few that already offer more than one portion size, he added. 

The Food and Drink Federation, which represents manufacturers, said in a statement that “this research once again confirms the complexity of tackling obesity and that multiple solutions are required, from considering the food we eat to the size of spoons we use to serve food.”

It said firms were providing clear nutritional information on the side of their products, including about portion sizes, and offering a range of portion sizes. 

Dr Alison Tedstone, the chief nutritionist at Public Health England, said: “This study clearly demonstrates that reducing portion sizes is a successful way to cut calories. Given that almost two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, it’s important to keep an eye on portion sizes when cooking, shopping and eating out to avoid overeating and help maintain a healthy weight.”

10 Practical Tips For Real Fat Loss

So you think you are really eating healthily?

Clients tell me all the time that they are already eating ‘healthy’…but when we look at their eating choices I can point out some not so obvious foods they should exclude.

Think about this…… if you think ‘breakfast cereal’ is a good idea then you really need to read this list and find out the other 9 you should avoid.

10 Foods you MUST avoid to Lose Belly Fat

To build a lean, curvy, sexy figure you need to make sure that around 90% of your diet consists of whole unprocessed foods –
basically avoid anything that comes out of a box most of the time – instead go for lean meats, veggies, eggs, fruits, etc.

If you are eating 5-6 meals each day (and most of you should be) that leaves room for about 4 junk/convenience meals each week.
Be sure your diet contains plenty of protein too!

When it comes to building your best body, maybe you’re not eating as healthy as you think.

Here are 10 foods you may think are good
for you, but in reality are not, and can be very detrimental in your efforts at building the body you desire.

#1. Breakfast Cereals. Cereals are labeled low fat, healthy and recommended for weight loss. Cereals naturally don’t contain lots of fat. Most boxed breakfast cereals are extraordinarily high in sugar. Always check the label to see where sugar (or anything that ends in ‘ose’) is on the ingredient list. The closer it is to the top, the more sugar it contains.

If you’re serious about your health you’ll be cutting as much sugar as you can OUT of your food.

CHALLENGE: don’t buy any food with sugar in the top 4 or 5 ingredients. (even yoghurt). Let me know how you get on!

Meal Tip: Traditional oatmeal or Weetabix.


#2. Muesli/Granola Bars.
Muesli bars contain some healthy ingredients
such as oats, nuts and seeds but they’re glued together with things like corn syrup, honey and just plain sugar, which send your blood sugar levels through the roof. Some bars also contain chocolate chips, chunks of dried fruits making
them not much better than a Mars Bar or Snickers!
Basically they are a low protein, high fat and high sugar, body fat storing treat!

Meal Tip: Homemade protein bars/cakes:

Mix 1 cup oats (dry) + 2 scoops vanilla protein powder + 1-1.5 cup water
+ vanilla, sweetener to taste (ie Stevia), cinnamon +
– shredded carrots OR
-1 heaped cup of blueberries OR
-1 cup pumpkin

Then pour into a shallow baking tray and bake for around 45min at 180 C (350 F)


#3. Low Fat Yogurt.

Fat free doesn’t mean healthy. Low fat yoghurts usually contain a lot of sugar, approximately 7 teaspoons per 200g container! Add a piece of fruit and your blood sugar (and insulin)
levels will skyrocket again – are you seeing a picture building?
You had cereal for breakfast, at coffee break you avoided the biscuits and cake and chose a ‘healthy’ yoghurt – sadly you’ve had just as much sugar which in turn keeps your blood sugar level high and your body just doesn’t need to use any of your stored body fat for energy!

Meal Tip: plain unflavoured yogurt or Greek yoghurt (My absolute favourite- healthy fats and dairy) add fruit, seeds and protein powder for a nutritious sweet treat. Add sweet chilli sauce to make a quick, tasty dressing to replace mayo.

#4. Fat Free Muffins
Convenient and taste good, but nowhere near
as healthy as you think. Usually massive in size, they are high in processed carbs, sugar and calories – a dieter’s nightmare! Avoid these like the plague!

Meal Tip: As for point #3, homemade protein bars/cakes or just chose a couple of pieces of whole fresh fruit and a handful of raw nuts!!

#5. Sandwiches, panini, baguettes purchased from cafés and supermarkets. Have you read the ingredients list of these things?
They often contain sugar laden dressings, little veggies and not enough protein, and way too much bread. Just open them up and have a look at the tiny amount of filling.

Meal Tip: make a bowl of salad instead, or even better cook extra food in the evening and pack it for lunch the next day.

6. Fruit Juice
. Even 100% fruit juice is high in sugar – it doesn’t matter if it’s natural or not. Fresh fruit juice is not a fat loss favourite.
When you consider how many apples/oranges (or your choice of fruit) is required to make a cup of juice you can probably understand my point on this one. Too many calories and an overload of sugar will not do your physique any favours.
Juices deprive you of beneficial fibre and other nutrients it brings.

Meal Tip: choose smoothies mixed with protein powder instead.

7. Cheese and crackers. A popular snack, but
are highly processed, usually wheat or grain based (many people have wheat intolerance
and should reduce the amount of wheat they consume) and are highly processed. The combination of highly processed carbohydrates (crackers) and fat (cheese) can be a dangerous one for fat loss. If you watched he recent programme on Sugar and Fat on the BBC – you’ll see that cheese and crackers are exactly what they were talking about! The carbs in the crackers (sugars) and the fat in the cheese give this half and half combo which guarantees fat storage!

Meal Tip: Brown rice cakes and cottage cheese, or even cottage cheese and fresh fruit are a much better fat loss alternative.

8. Sport Drinks. Supposed to help you replenish electrolytes and carbohydrates.
They’re actually just sugar water, with up to 40g of sugar per bottle.
If fat loss is your goal a post training shake to assist your recovery (provided you have trained intensely for over 25 mins). Post workout for example you could add 20- 30g whey protein to a bottle of Gatorade.

Meal Tip: Drink plain water during your workout, and fast absorbing protein + carbohydrates within 45minutes of your workout.

9. Fast Food Salads. Contain sugar-laden salad dressings hiding preservatives and hidden fat.

Meal Tip: stick to a garden type tossed salad and add the dressing or not, or grow and make your own salad from a window box or two!

10. Frozen Meals. Frozen fruits and vegetables are great for you, But a TV dinner type meal is NOT! They’re processed, high in sugar and carbs, usually low in protein and have added sauces and lots of sodium. The quality of the ingredients is often Not the best. Avoid if possible.

Meal Tip: cook your own – if time is an issue, have a ‘cook up’ day or two each week and freeze your own home cooked meals ready to ‘grab and go.
You can get disposable ‘take-away’ tubs easily now, so you can batch cook your favourites and fill your freezer with healthy meals.

Follow these tips and you’ll feel better, lose stored fat and have plenty of energy.
More important – you’ll keep your enthusiasm for your healthy eating plan!

Let me know how you get on…
Do you have any recipes or tricks that work for you?
Share them here…..

Eat Clean. Train Hard. Feel Great!

Jax

For Amy, Nibblers & Snackers

For Amy and everyone else that cant stick to their diet!! Nibblers and Snackers take note!

4 Key Strategies for Killing Food Cravings
adapted from an article by Chad Tackett

When you’re constantly hungry, it makes choosing the right foods
at the right times really challenging.

Staying full and energized while eating fewer calories—that’s the
secret to long-term fat loss success.

Here are 4 key strategies for feeling satisfied after a healthy meal
and staying full longer. You’ll not only have a lot more energy, you’ll
crave (and eat) less later. . .

1. Eat your water. Yes, eat. Drinking water is great, and you should throughout the day, but it doesn’t provide the same level of feeling satisfied as when you eat foods high in water.

There is a separate mechanism in the brain that controls hunger and thirst. If the food you eat contains water, it will stay in the stomach longer while it’s being digested.

PLUS, foods high in water are naturally very low in calories – making them ideal for fat loss.

Many fruits and vegetables contain 90 – 98 percent water! The following are some of the most hydrating foods. . .

– Watermelon contains 92% water and electrolytes, such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium – all of which (positively) influence your metabolism!

– Grapefruit contains only 30 calories and is comprised of 90%
water!

– Cucumbers are 96% water and contain just 14 calories in an entire cup!

– Cantaloupe is 89% water and contains only 27 calories per 1/2 cup!

– Strawberries contain just 23 calories per 1/2 cup and are made up of approximately 92% water. Plus, strawberries rank as the 4th strongest antioxidant-rich fruit!

– Broccoli contains 90% water and anti-cancer nutrients that help to detoxify the vast number of potential toxins that we encounter each day. Plus, it’s a great source of fibre!

You may have noticed that these water-dense foods are all carbs.
Because they’re natural (and not processed), I’d suggest the portion
being about the size of your fist. So, a small grapefruit or a cup of sliced strawberries, for example, would work well.

2. Fill up on fibre. Fibre is critical to fat loss in several ways: first, fibre contains only 1.5 to 2.5 calories per gram, while other carbs contain 4 calories per gram (fat contains 9 calories per gram I always estimate 10 cals/ g).
Essentially, you can pile your plate with plenty of high-fibre foods without worrying about caloric-overload.

In addition to being low-calorie, high-fibre foods are more filling.
Fibre is absorbed by our bodies more slowly than other foods, which means we feel full longer.

Foods high in fibre are fruits and vegetables, beans, lentils, legumes,
and natural whole grains. Aim for at least 25-35 grams each day to
help reduce your caloric intake and keep you feeling full and energised for longer.

3. Include protein at every meal. A meal with carbs alone causes blood sugar spikes and crashes, which leave you feeling tired, hungry,
and weak. Protein helps prevent this happening, so that the carbs you eat aren’t converted to body fat, and allows energy to be
released slowly.

Great protein sources are lean meats, fish, lowfat dairy, legumes,
and unprocessed soy products.

Your choice of protein should be approximately the size of your
palm. For example, a medium-sized chicken breast.

4. Don’t leave out healthy fat. Since fat is so calorie-dense, it’s important that you eat it in moderation . . . BUT in small amounts,
it provides flavour and has a positive impact on slowing insulin response, like protein.

My favorite healthy fat source are nuts and seeds because they are also a great source of protein and fibre. Other excellent fat
sources are avocados, olives, and fatty fish (e.g., wild salmon).

The fat source you choose should be about the size of your thumb. This is about 5 almonds for the average-sized woman or 7 almonds for the average man.

Put this into Action NOW – you know which foods keep you feeling full and satisfied throughout the day, here are some great ideas that combine them all together for one super fat-burning snack or
meal:

1. Stir in a little peanut butter (healthy fat) and protein powder
(protein) into oatmeal (fiber), topped with strawberries (water).

2. Dip cucumbers (water) in hummus (fiber and healthy fat) and
cottage cheese (protein).

3. Marinate broccoli (water and fiber) and boneless, skinless
chicken breast (protein) in a little olive oil (healthy fat) and
balsamic vinegar and wrap it in aluminum foil on the BBQ.

4. A bowl of Greek yogurt (protein) with pieces of watermelon
(water), topped with flaxseeds (fiber and healthy fat). I add protein powder to this too.

These are my tips for planning my meals so that I can stay focused on
my weight loss goals. I love seeing people take control of their health,
and I’m so happy to be able to be a part of that.

Like I said, staying full while eating fewer calories is the secret to success. Do that, and avoid the daily pitfalls, and you will succeed.

A few small,
easy changes in your daily routine will have profound, lasting effects
to reach your weight loss goals. End the self sabotaging now.

This information has worked for my clients and myself. If you want, it will work for you.

Follow me Twitter @jaxallenfitness for daily healthy tips.

Friend me on Facebook Jax Allen
For more info and to join my fitness groups.

Sandwich Anyone?

Sandwich Anyone?

 

The wheat we eat today is full of gluten – the stuff that makes it sticky; in fact this stuff is often used as a binding agent for postage stamps yum – not. The wheat we consume today is actually bio engineered to contain 90% more gluten than our grandparents ate, and there is less than half the protein in our wheat today versus 50 years ago. Also while on the subject of nutritional value according to a Rutgers University study it now takes 19 ears of corn to equal the nutritional value of one ear of corn grown in the 1940’s!
It’s crazy, the soil our crops is grown in is so depleted that it is entirely dependant on the chemical fertilizers it is given to grow, so it becomes devoid of the essential minerals we need as humans!
So what happens when we eat wheat – well when you consume wheat, the gluten in it swells in your intestinal tract, often constipating you. Then the immune system is activated to attack that very part of the lining of the intestinal tract, causing bloating, wind, maybe diarrhoea and nausea – these symptoms should alert you to the fact that your body is rejecting the food you’re putting into it. And also the immune system can’t do its normal job of protecting you from viruses – it’s trying to protect you from what you’re eating, so you’re getting sick easier.
Also, when consumed, wheat is more easily transferred to blood sugar in the body than any other carbohydrate. Dr William Davis, a preventative cardiologist, says, “two slices of whole wheat bread increase blood sugar to a higher level than a chocolate snack bar. And then, after about two hours, your blood sugar plunges and you get shaky, your brain feels foggy, you’re hungry.   So let’s say you have an English muffin for breakfast. Two hours later you’re starving, so you have a handful of crackers, and then some crisps, and your blood sugar rises again. That cycle of highs and lows just keeps going throughout the day, so you’re constantly feeling hungry and constantly eating. Dieticians have responded to this by advising that we graze throughout the day, which is just nonsense. If you eliminate wheat from your diet, you’re no longer hungry between meals because you’ve stopped that cycle. You’ve cut out the appetite stimulant, and consequently you lose weight very quickly

So, any one for a sandwich???

Jax© 021011

 

Gluten-Free Carrot Muffins

Gluten-Free Carrot Muffins

Makes 12 muffins

Moist, sweet and subtly spiced, these muffins will become a new favorite.

Ingredients

2 medium carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1 cup chopped pitted dates 1/2 cup chopped walnuts 1/4 cup melted virgin coconut or high-heat sunflower oil 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup 3/4 cup amaranth flour or millet flour 3/4 cup ground almond flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Method

Line 12 muffin cups with paper liners or oil with natural cooking spray and set aside. Preheat oven to 375°F. Place carrots and dates in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse and then blend until finely chopped. Add walnuts and pulse to finely chop.  Transfer to a bowl; add oil, eggs and maple syrup, stir to combine completely. In a separate bowl, combine all remaining dry ingredients. Pour liquid ingredients over dry ingredients and stir until just combined. Spoon batter into prepared muffin tins and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

Nutrition

Per serving: 240 calories (110 from fat), 13g total fat , 1.5g saturated fat, 35mg cholesterol, 170mg sodium, 29g total carbohydrate (4g dietary fiber, 16g sugar), 6g protein

http://wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/2893   another great recipe – visit their site for more fabulous ideas.  Jax xx