Coca-Cola ‘trying to manipulate public’ on sugar-obesity link

Coca-Cola has spent millions of pounds funding research institutes and scientists who cast doubt on the link between sugary drinks and obesity.


The drinks firm is said to have links to more than a dozen British scientists, including government health advisers, who counter claims that its drinks contribute to obesity.

The revelation of Coca-Cola’s scientific funding comes weeks after the government rejected a tax on sugar sweetened drinks, despite support from Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies, the British Medical Association and TV chef Jamie Oliver.

An investigation by The Times published on Friday revealed the full scale of Coca-Cola’s funding of scientists.

According to the investigation, Coca-Cola spent £4.86 million setting up the European Hydration Institute (EHI), a seemingly independent research foundation which has recommended sport and soft drinks of the sort the company sells to the public, including children.

The newspaper claimed that Ron Maughan, chairman of the EHI’s scientific advisory board, is an emeritus professor from a university which received almost £1 million from Coca-Cola while he provided nutritional advice to leading sports bodies.

Maughan has advised UK Athletics and the Football Association and has also been a consultant for Coca-Cola and other drinks companies since the 1990s, according to The Times.

Coca-Cola is said to have provided support, sponsorship or research funding to a variety of British organizations including UKActive, the British Nutrition Foundation, the University of Hull, Homerton University Hospital, the National Obesity Forum, the British Dietetic Association, Obesity Week 2013 and the UK Association for the Study of Obesity.

Through its trade organizations, Coca-Cola representatives have met government officials and ministers more than 100 times between 2011 and 2014, according to The Times. Coca-Cola is also said to host a parliamentary dinner.

Faculty of Public Health board member Simon Capewell accused Coca-Cola of trying to shape public opinion.

Coca-Cola is trying to manipulate not just public opinion but policy and political decisions. Its tactics echo those used by the tobacco and alcohol industries, which have also tried to influence the scientific process by funding apparently independent groups. It’s a conflict of interest that flies in the face of good practice,” he said.

New York-based nutrition researcher Marion Nestle warned scientists should not take money from Coca-Cola.

In my opinion, no scientist should accept funding from Coca-Cola. It’s totally compromising. Period. End of discussion,” said Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health.

Coca-Cola of Great Britain said: “We rely on scientific research to make decisions about our products and ingredients and commission independent third parties to carry out this work.”

Professor Maughan recognized “the need for caution” over industry funding but said that much good research would not otherwise have taken place. Loughborough said its research studies were subject to a strict code of conduct.

Foods To Avoid #2

#2 – Fruit Juice  
The fruit juice we buy in stores sometimes may not be entirely or completely made from fruit juice. UNFORTUNATELY… IT CAN GET A LOT WORSE when we consider just what the fruit juices we buy may contain. It may be a mix of substances that taste like fruit but not actually fruit.
  

CAN YOU BELIEVE THIS? IT’S HAPPENING and many people are falling victim to this marketing phenomenon. It can seem convenient to simply walk into a grocery store and buy a container of fruit juice. However, WHAT ARE WE ACTUALLY BUYING? Are we simply buying into the potential lie that the fruit juice we buy is good for us?

  
Pure fruit juice is the healthier option and with this option, there is still the need to watch consumption levels because natural fruit juice can still contain significant levels of sugar. Such sugar content can have an impact on diseases like diabetes as research shows [2]. Research studies also reveal that sugar can also have an impact in affecting other medical conditions including cardiometabolic risk factors [3].
By focusing on the juice of the fruit alone, we also eliminate the fiber and other benefits we get from eating the whole fruit and not only extracting the juice.
I suggest while trying to reduce body fat – eliminate fruit juice from your nutrition plan. 
When re-introducing juice make sure it’s natural and complete then add the same volume of water to reduce sugar content by half. 
Enjoy
Jax 

Healthy Dips

By Cara Rosenbloom, RD
Posted: September 2013

A tasty dip is great way to make the veggies go down. Here’s how to choose dips that add nutrition – not just fat and salt.
Cara Rosenbloom, RD

A tasty dip can make the veggies go down. But it’s important to choose one that adds healthy nutrition, not just fat and salt.
The research is in: Kids really will eat more vegetables if they are paired with dip.
In one study, researchers gave plain vegetables, as well as veggies with different dips, to preschool children. The children were three times more likely to reject the vegetable alone, compared with the vegetable-dip combo. In a different study, children who were sensitive to the bitter taste of vegetables ate 80 per cent more broccoli when it was paired with a dip or dressing. I haven’t found a similar study on adult palates, but the concept is certainly worth a try!
However, some dips are high in fat and salt, and add little nutritional value to meals and snacks. There are better options!
Healthiest store-bought choices
Whether you are buying a container of dip or a bottled dressing, it’s important to read the ingredient list and the Nutrition Facts panel to look for options that are low in saturated fat, sodium and sugar, but high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.
For example, hummus is a source of fibre from chickpeas; nut-based dips such as peanut butter (yes it tastes great with celery or green pepper) contain heart-healthy magnesium; and dips made from yogurt contain calcium and protein.
On the other hand, ranch dip or dressing offers only fat and sodium, while mustard contains sodium and nothing else.
Pick a dip that lists one of these healthy options as the first ingredient:
Chick peas

White, black or pinto beans

Yogurt or Greek yogurt

Fresh produce: tomato, avocado, spinach, roasted red peppers, pumpkin, etc.

Cottage or light ricotta cheese

Edamame, tofu or soynuts

Nuts or seeds (such as almond or sunflower seed butter)

If the first ingredient is sour cream, cream cheese or mayonnaise, keep shopping. These dips will be high in fat, but lower in protein and other valuable nutrients. If your recipe calls for these ingredients, try using low-fat Greek yogurt instead. It’s thick, creamy and plain-tasting, so it marries nicely with dip-friendly flavours such as dill, garlic, chili flakes, pepper and cumin.
Some dips are high in sodium, so a little goes a long way. If you are a big dipper, choose options with less sodium. Here’s how some popular dips compare in terms of sodium content.
Dip (2 tbsp)

Sodium (mg)

Processed cheese sauce

541

Yellow mustard

330

Low-fat ranch dressing

290

Ketchup

280

Cream cheese onion dip

260

Original ranch dressing

260

Spinach dip

190

Salsa

190

Hummus

130

Nut/seed butter (salt added)

120

Guacamole

85

Yogurt tzatziki

55

Nut/seed butter (no salt added)

0

You can see that the whole food-based dips near the bottom have the least amount of sodium. They also have more protein, vitamins, minerals and healthy fat! It’s win-win.
Make your own
I like to experiment with my own dip recipes, as does Heart and Stroke Foundation recipe developer Emily Richards. Try her delicious Navy bean hummus and Greek yogurt ranch dip.
My kids love dipping carrots and peppers into pureed chickpeas with cumin and lemon juice (it’s like hummus without the garlic), or almond butter blended with Greek yogurt and a touch of cinnamon. I love watching them eat their vegetables – and knowing the dip is giving them a little extra nutrition in every bite. 

This article comes from the heart and stroke foundation Canada. A great resource. 

Jax 

Fructose, Sugar and Your Health…..

This one’s for Sarah R…..

This will answer some of your questions raised from my last post on Facebook about what to drink…..

Even though most people understand that sweetened drinks are “bad for them”, I think it’s a disconnect between not fully understanding what fructose does to the cells of your body that makes people not take it more seriously. If they really understood that they were swallowing poison when they drink a soda or a high-fructose corn syrup sweetened fruit drink, I think most people wouldn’t choose to drink that. Or is it really THAT addictive?

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Fructose from sweetened drinks (and other ingredients) affects affects your brain, kidneys, digestive system, your weight, hormones, your heart, and more…

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Is fructose harming your heart, brain, hormones and liver? (plus the worst sources, and the “not so bad”)

Keep in mind that honey is a source of fructose that should be used with caution, you also need to realize that quantity matters… if you’re only having a teaspoon a day of honey in your tea, this is NOT something to be concerned about as we’re talking about no more than 5 grams of sugar from honey in that case. On the other hand, a soda or sweetened fruit drink usually has 40-50 grams of sugar or more (and a large amount of that in fructose form), so you can see in these examples that honey is NOT usually an issue unless you were taking it in very large doses for reason, and is not even comparable to the sugar and fructose load that you get with sweetened drinks. Plus, in the smaller doses that are typical of a small spoon of honey in your tea, the honey does indeed have some valuable micronutrients, whereas the fructose in corn syrup has ZERO benefits.

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Also, many people have asked “how much fruit is too much?” because fruit does contain fructose. Again, the fructose in fruit is generally not nearly as much of a concern as sweetened drinks or other junk foods that contain corn syrup, because the quantity is relatively low and you also get valuable micronutrients from fruit. As a generalization, most people do best to limit fruit to 1-2 servings a day to keep the total sugar intake from fruit to around 20-40 grams per day total, but combined with the natural fiber that’s in fruit, which again, makes fruit more beneficial than sweetened drinks or junk foods sweetened with corn syrup and other sweeteners.

Eat clean. Train smart. Feel great

Jax

Is Sugar Your Enemy?

Sugar Facts
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Sugar is empty calories and a poison for your health, vitality, longevity and fat loss. When you consume sugar, glucose levels rise. Your body tries to balance your glucose so your insulin levels go up. Shortly after, glucose levels plummet and crash causing low blood sugar, which triggers intense and increased cravings for more sugar. If you give in to your craving your glucose levels rise back up. This vicious cycle continues. The end result is low energy, moodiness, fatigue, hormonal imbalances, weight gain, insulin resistance and an increased risk of diabetes.
Sugar stimulates pleasure centers in the brain. Cravings provide insight into your unique metabolism and are a sign of imbalances often in conjunction to specific nutrient deficiencies and neurotransmitter imbalances.
If you find yourself craving sugar, it’s important to determine the root cause and understand why you crave sugar to break the cycle of addiction.

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Reasons for sugar cravings:
• You’re not properly nourished with a balance of nutrient-rich food.
• Candida, intestinal yeast and parasites.
• Hormone fluctuations and imbalances.
• Neurotransmitter imbalances.
• Insufficient sleep.
• Dehydration.
• Insulin resistance, blood sugar fluctuations and imbalances.
• Unmanaged stress and adrenal dysfunction. High or low cortisol, or a problem with the cortisol rhythm.
• Nutrient deficiencies.
• Digestive problems, bacterial imbalances and hypochlorhydria.
• Recovering alcoholic. Former alcoholics often replace alcohol with sweets and sugary beverages without realizing that sugar disrupts nutrient balance and intestinal flora, promoting Candida and other fungi. Under certain conditions these pathogenic yeasts actually convert sugars in the gut to alcohol. Walk into any AA meeting and you’ll find a spread of candy, cakes and cookies. Some recovering alcoholics will even convert the sugar to alcohol metabolically and maintain their alcohol addiction in this way. There are well-documented cases of inebriation caused by sugar consumption and Candida overgrowth in persons who abstain from alcohol.

The body is a wonderful thing!

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results

Jax

10 Foods to Avoid to Lose Fat

So you think you are really eating healthily?

Clients tell me all the time that they are already eating ‘healthy’…but when we look at their eating choices I can point out some not so obvious foods they should exclude.

Think about this…… if you think ‘breakfast cereal’ is a good idea then you really need to read this list and find out the other 9 you should avoid.

10 Foods you MUST avoid to Lose Belly Fat

To build a lean, curvy, sexy figure you need to make sure that around 90% of your diet consists of whole unprocessed foods –
basically avoid anything that comes out of a box most of the time – instead go for lean meats, veggies, eggs, fruits, etc.

If you are eating 5-6 meals each day (and MOST of you should be) and if you train hard that leaves room for about 4 junk/convenience meals each week.
Be sure your diet contains plenty of protein too!

When it comes to building your best body, maybe you’re not eating as healthy as you think.

Here are 10 foods you may think are good
for you, but in reality are not, and will be detrimental in your efforts to build the body you really want.

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1. Breakfast Cereals. Cereals are labeled low fat, healthy and recommended for weight loss. Cereals naturally don’t contain lots of fat. Most boxed breakfast cereals are extraordinarily high in sugar. Always check the label to see where sugar (or anything that ends in ‘ose’) is on the ingredient list. The closer it is to the top, the more sugar it contains.

If you’re serious about your health you’ll be cutting as much sugar as you can OUT.

CHALLENGE: don’t buy any food with sugar in the top 4 or 5 ingredients. (even yoghurt). Let me know how you get on!

2. Muesli/Granola Bars. Muesli bars contain some healthy ingredients
such as nuts and seeds but they’re glued together with things
like corn syrup, honey and just plain sugar, which raise your blood sugar and encourage fat storage. Some bars also contain chocolate chips, making
them not much better than a Mars Bar or Snickers! Basically they
are low in protein, high in fat and sugar – a fat loss disaster – you have to be careful with protein bars too.

FatlossTip: Homemade protein bars/cakes:

Mix 1 cup oats (dry) + 2 scoops vanilla protein powder + 1-1.5 cup water
+ vanilla, sweetener (ie Stevia), cinnamon + shredded carrots and raisins OR
-1 heaping cup of blueberries OR
-1 cup pumpkin

Then pour into a small casserole dish or baking ton and bake for around 45min at
180 C (350 F)

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3. Low Fat Yogurt. Fat free doesn’t mean healthy. Low fat yoghurts
usually contain a lot of sugar, approximately 7 teaspoons per 200g
container! Add a piece of fruit and your blood sugar (and insulin)
levels will skyrocket.

Fatloss Tip: choose plain unflavoured Greek yoghurt make it your own by adding fresh fruit, nuts and seeds.

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4. Fat Free Muffins Convenient and taste good, but nowhere near
as healthy as you think. Usually massive in size, they are high in
processed carbs, sugar and calories – a dieter’s nightmare! Avoid
like the plague!

5. Sandwiches purchased from cafes. Have you seen the size
of these things? Often enough to feed a small family, they also
often contain sugar laden dressings, little veggies and not enough
protein, and too much bread. Freshness is also questionable.

Fatloss Tip: don’t buy or eat bread!

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6. Fruit Juice. Even 100% fruit juice is high in sugar – it doesn’t
matter if it’s natural or not. Fresh fruit juice is not a fat loss favourite.
When you consider how many apples/oranges (or your choice of
fruit) is required to make a cup of juice you can probably understand
where I am headed with this one. Too many calories and an overload
of sugar will not do your physique any favours. Plus, when juiced
you don’t even get the benefit of the fibre.

Fatloss Tip: eat fresh or frozen fruit instead. If you’re serious about losing body fat you’ll limit fruit to 1 of your 9 a day – that means 8 veggies !

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7. Cheese and crackers. This is a popular dieter’s snack, but
are usually wheat based (many people have wheat intolerance
and should reduce the amount of wheat they consume) and are
highly processed. The combination of highly processed carbohydrates
(crackers) and fat (cheese) can be a dangerous one for fat loss.

Sue’s Tip: Brown rice cakes and cottage cheese are a much better
fat loss alternative And good evening snack before bed as the protein digests slowly overnight.

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8. Sport Drinks. These are supposed to help you replenish electrolytes
and carbohydrates. It’s actually just sugar water, with up to 40g of
sugar per serving. If you are looking for fat loss, the only time these
would be indicated is as a post weight training shake to assist with
recovery (provided you have trained your muscles intensely). And then,
you should add 30g whey protein.

Fatloss Tip: Drink plain water during your workout, and protein +
carbohydrates post workout

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9. Fast Food Salads. Contain sugar-laden salad dressings, preservatives
and generally loads of hidden fat.

Fatloss Tip: stick to a garden type tossed salad and add your own
dressing, or make your own salads.
You should add a green salad to every meal!

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10. Frozen Meals. Frozen fruits and vegetables are great for you,
so don’t get confused with this. I’m referring to the full TV dinner
type meal. They’re processed, high in sugar and carbs, usually low
in protein and have added sauces and lots of salt. Avoid if possible.

Fatloss Tip: cook your own – if time is an issue, have a ‘cook up’ day or
two each week and freeze your own home cooked meals ready to ‘grab
and go. I cook extra portions and freeze for future disorganised days.

Follow these 10 Rules and you WILL lose body fat!

Eat clean, Train Smart, Feel Great

Jax

Sugar – Your Biggest Enemy?

Study Shows Sugary Drinks Cause Inflammation

A placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial, carried out recently at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, showed that drinking low to moderate amounts of sugary drinks for just three weeks disrupted glucose and lipid metabolism and promoted inflammation in healthy young men, in ways that could lead to type 2 diabetes5.

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Fructose Leads to Abdominal Fat & Obesity

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Even more worrying is evidence that fructose, the main sugar in sweetened soft drinks, alters the way developing fat cells in children’s bodies behave, leading to insulin resistance and abdominal obesity, both of which can contribute to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Eat Clean. Feel Great.

Jax

WARNING Fructose = Diabetes T2 & IBS – Don’t Eat It !

This Dirty Little Secret Increases Your Diabetes Risk

This article is from one of my favourite websites……..
Dear Reader,

I can give you plenty of good reasons to avoid fructose, but all you need is one: Type 2 diabetes.

A new study highlights diabetes and all the other key reasons why it’s essential to avoid this dangerous component of processed foods and soft drinks.

The research findings speak for themselves

When I read that US researchers at the University of California, Davis (UCD), recently presented a new fructose study at the American Diabetes Association 67th Annual Scientific Sessions in Chicago, something rang a bell. That ringing came from eight years ago, in an e-Alert I sent our members about a UCD study from some of the same researchers who mounted this new study.

The 2002 UCD study reported on animal testing that showed how fructose consumption contributed to insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and elevated triglyceride levels — three of the core symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Other metabolic syndrome symptoms include excessive abdominal fat, high C-reactive protein level, and low HDL (‘good’) cholesterol. Three or more of these symptoms put a patient at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

In the conclusions to their 2002 study, the UCD team noted that a high intake of fructose might increase body weight and encourage insulin resistance.

Five years later, a study of human subjects confirms those results…

The UCD researchers began by giving a series of tests to assess heart disease risk in 23 overweight adults, aged 43 to 70.

Study profile:

* For two weeks, each subject ate a strict diet that consisted of 30 per cent fat, and 55 per cent complex carbohydrates.

* After the first phase was complete, subjects were allowed to eat whatever they liked for eight weeks, along with three sweetened beverages each day that supplied a quarter of their energy intake — about half the group drank a glucose beverage while the other half drank a fructose beverage.

* After the second phase was complete, subjects returned to the 30/55 diet while continuing with their daily drinks.

* Throughout the study, further checks of heart disease indicators occurred at two, eight, and 10 weeks.

Results showed that just two weeks after subjects began drinking sweetened drinks, triglyceride (blood fat) levels were up in the fructose group, but had actually dropped in the glucose group.

Over the entire range of the study, LDL (‘bad’) cholesterol increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in the fructose group but didn’t change in the glucose group. In addition, fructose subjects gained about three pounds overall, but no weight gain was reported in the glucose group.

Fructose by any other name…

UCD researcher, Dr Peter J. Havel (who participated in both the 2002 and 2007 studies), told WebMD Medical News that most people get added sugars in their diet from daily beverages — which tends to be a lifelong habit, far exceeding the two weeks in which fructose quickly had an adverse effect on triglycerides.

So what exactly is in that vast array of choices in the beverage aisle?

Checking the ingredients of your soft drink, sports tea, vitamin water, power drink, etc, you might wonder what the difference is between fructose, high fructose corn syrup, and crystalline fructose. Is one better than the other? Well… put it this way: If only part of your house is on fire, your house is still on fire.

The average high fructose corn syrup is made up of about 50 per cent fructose.

But according to the Sugar Association (sugar.org), increased fructose content of HFCS is becoming more common. Some of these syrups contain more than 90 per cent fructose.

And then there’s crystalline fructose that’s present in many ‘health’ drinks and vitamin-enhanced beverages. But does the process of crystallizing magically transform fructose into something healthy? Let’s look at the contents. According to the Fructose Information Center (fructose.org), crystalline fructose contains nearly 100 per cent fructose. And just to make it even less appealing, it contains traces of lead, chloride, and arsenic. Yum! And keep in mind this information comes from an association that ADVOCATES fructose use and consumption.

All of this is very bad news for those who are fructose intolerant and don’t even know it. They may suffer from chronic problems such as irritable bowel syndrome without making the connection between their condition and their fructose intake.

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Interesting, eh?

So, from now on don’t buy anything containing fructose!! It’s not harmless fruit sugar.

You’ll find it in Diabetic jams, chocolates, sweets or soft drinks.  Stop adding fructose to your baking too!!

 

Use either table sugar or Stevia / Truvia which is the ONLY safe sweetener I have ever come across.

 

Eat Clean    Live Well    Feel Great

 

Jax

Food FACTS Keep Changing! FATS? WINE?

Last week science helped us clearly establish that wine may or may not be good for you.
‘Here we go again’ I hear you say!

Now, what about fat?

The Big Fat Surprise’ author Nina Teicholz
In the latest is-it-or-isn’t-it nutrition debate, author and cheese advocate Nina Teicholz says fat has been misunderstood and unfairly vilified. Her new book, The Big Fat Surprise, argues that more fat—including the saturated kind found in meat, dairy, and eggs—leads to better health and weight
We all want to know how she decided it was all right to give such seemingly indulgent advice. What follows is an edited, condensed version of the conversation.

So now you would have us get our fill of fat?

You can have a good 50, 60 percent of your calories as fat, and that’s fine.
It won’t damage your heart. Don’t be afraid of those foods. They’re tasty and uniquely satisfying, and we’ve been terrified of eating them. This French woman I ran into said, “I love cheese, but I feel like I’ll be condemning my children to being orphans.” And I said, “Eat the cheese! It won’t cause your early death, and it’s delicious.”

Saturated fat does not cause heart disease, and a high-fat diet over the last decade has been rigorously tested in numerous clinical trials, and it shows that a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet is healthier than a low-fat diet looking at markers for heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

What do you eat?

I start my day with bacon, or egg, or sausage, or meatballs.

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Meatballs?

‘Farmer Boy ‘ author Laura Ingalls

If you read Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Farmer Boy they eat meatballs for breakfast, too—I was so amused by that. For lunch I graze because I never really sit down for lunch. I’ll have handfuls of nuts, cheese, tuna fish salad. In the evening, we have some kind of stew or roasted chicken or fish.

But is a data point of one. Science is about looking at large groups of people—data points are anecdotes and they’re interesting, but they don’t establish truth. So you don’t have to eat chicken and fish for the rest of your life.
(1By the way, not all chickens are sources of unsaturated fat due to intensive production methods – but that’s another story!)

And you’re health is fine? Your weight?

The last time I got my cholesterol tested, it looked great; it looked better than when I was in my thirties, and I’m in my forties now. I’m not super thin because I’ve been sitting at my computer for so many months now, but my weight is normal.

Then why do all of us think fat is unhealthy?

The idea that saturated fat causes heart disease goes back to a theory rooted in the 1950s that was proposed by one scientist and became enshrined, first in the American Heart Association in 1961 and became basically over the years a fact. But it had never been tested. Evidence against it—when it was finally shown—[the claim] was really poor and inconclusive and has since fallen apart.

No offense, but why should we trust you?

I have been digging into this research for 10 years. I looked through all of the original research. I did not rely on any summary or review documents. We’re in the third generation of scientists universally believing that fat and saturated fat cause heart disease. That’s accepted, and no one goes back to read what it’s based on. I don’t accept—and have not accepted—any industry money in my research. Almost everyone in nutrition researchers [gets] funding from industry because the government just doesn’t fund that much nutrition research. It doesn’t automatically bias their results, but I came without any preconceptions in this field. I am an outsider who brings a rigorous, science-journalist perspective.

My Comments
I eat 2 or 3 chicken or goose eggs, bacon and spinach, sometimes sausages for breakfast most days of the week. And, have done for the last three or four years. I’m well into my 50’s and my recent cholesterol test brought back shocking results! A very high 7.2 value – I panicked! With a naughty giggle my health care provider then explained that my good cholesterol was very high and the bad stuff was NO problem, PHEW!!

I don’t have any worries recommending a high or higher real fat diet to my Heart Patients.

‘What’s a REAL fat diet?’
Foods that have naturally occurring fats like meat, eggs, fish, nuts and seeds
Yes, saturated and unsaturated fats!
Saturated fats are digested, dealt with easily by your body. We have survived as a species by eating them. The difference these days us that we mess with our food by processing it, adding things to it, feeding poor quality food to our chickens, pigs, sheep and cattle.
If you choose Free Range and Wild caught food you won’t go far wrong.
In the UK, we are lucky, there are many food suppliers that don’t follow the intense production methods that reduce the nutrient value of our basic food stuffs.
We can still buy local fruit and veggies, that aren’t sprayed with tons of chemicals, and we don’t have to buy Organic everything to guarantee that.

If you really want to reduce your chances of Heart Disease, Diabetes and Obesity you must add in real food – high fat – including Real cheese ( NOT Processed)
BUT eliminate as many grain based foods as possible – that beans breakfast cereals! Because the best way to elevate your cholesterol, inflammation, joint pain and lots more nasty conditions is to eat foods containing Omega 6’s and fake processed sugars.

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Think about where you get your calories (energy) from, do you eat a rainbow of foods? ( M & M’s don’t count) if you do and you drink enough fluid, you will have a healthy gut, and have no need for Bran based cereals.

Give it a try, you will feel full. You’re energy levels will balance out over the day, cravings will disappear and so you won’t want high sugar snacks at coffee time or on your commute home.

Eat Clean, Feel Great!

2. Top Tips For Health – Drinks

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We all need to drink plenty of fluids in addition to the water we get from fruits and vegetables.
Too many people drink sweetened soda pop, fruit flavoured squash and fruit juices without realising the incredible amount of sugar and sweeteners, colours and flavourings included.

Better Choices would be –
1. Water – filtered perhaps
2. Coffee – yes coffee!
3. Tea – green, fruit, white or black

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4. Flavoured Water – add your own lemon or lime or add up to 50% fruit juice ( not from concentrate)
5. Wine – a small glass of red for anti-oxidants

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6. Smoothies – better than fruit juice as you get the fibre too
7. Hot Cocoa – natural and organic
8. Milk – great post exercise for recovery. Water, protein and fats in a great ratio.
9. Coconut Water – great rehydration, full of nutrients.

Eat Better – Feel Better

Jax<