UK Adolescents Dangerously Low Vit’ D Levels!

Sun exposure provides inadequate vitamin D in UK adolescentsFarrar MD, et al. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016;doi:10.1210/jc.2016-1559.

Adolescents in the United Kingdom did not get enough sunlight to receive healthy amounts of vitamin D in a study recently published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, prompting researchers to recommend changes to British government guidelines on vitamin D intake. More than one-quarter of the adolescents in the study had inadequate vitamin D levels even during summer, the period when participants spent the most time outdoors.
“Current U.K. national guidance on vitamin D acquisition assumes those aged 4 to 64 years gain their vitamin D requirements from sunlight alone, thus there is no recommended nutrient intake,” Mark D. Farrar, BSc, PhD,of the Centre for Dermatology, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, and colleagues wrote. “Meanwhile, substantial proportions of the global population, including the U.K., are reported to have low vitamin D status, and rickets has returned as a clinical concern.”

Exercise Could Slow The Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise Could Slow The Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

An article From The Real Diabetes Truth
admin | November 20, 2014 | Comments (0)

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Running around outside in the open air seems like a natural thing for children to do. And recent scientific findings suggest that exercise and sunshine could have some previously unknown health benefits. Scientists at the University of Birmingham Medical School tell us that exercise can have a protective effect on the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas and could help to prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in both children and adults. Meanwhile, on the other side of the globe, researchers in Perth, Australia have found that ultraviolet rays might boost metabolism in a way that prevents weight gain.

In the mid-20th century, children still ‘went out to play’. Play was active, often energetic and mostly outdoors. Then, in the wake of a few tragic cases of child abduction, parents started to worry whether unsupervised outdoor play was safe. Not long after, the first computerised games appeared. Then there were the dire warnings about sun exposure and skin cancer. As a result, for today’s children, ‘play’ often means sitting indoors with an electronic gadget. In parallel with this decline in physical activity, there has been a relentless rise in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes; and it seems that this could be more than coincidental.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin. As a result, beta cell function is reduced but may still be around 50 per cent of normal when type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. And studies have shown that beta cells may not be permanently killed off and could be capable of regeneration under the right conditions. As I mentioned here, around three-quarters of people with type 1 diabetes still have some functioning beta-cells.

Exercise appears to have a beneficial impact on the beta cells in several different ways, by altering levels of various hormones, glucose and fats in the blood and by affecting inflammatory substances and immune system activity. In an article published recently in the journal Diabetologia, the University of Birmingham researchers review the evidence that exercise promotes beta cell proliferation, reduces beta cell death and could help to preserve beta cell function in diabetic patients.1 The evidence for this is now so strong that the authors call for clinical trials to determine the type, intensity and duration of exercise that has the greatest benefit. The idea that something as simple as exercise could have a huge effect on the global epidemic of diabetes may not please the pharmaceutical companies but it make a lot of sense to me.

Sunshine – it’s not just about vitamin D

The Australian research found that exposing overfed mice to ultraviolet (UV) light slowed their weight gain.2 Not only that – it also suppressed the development of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and reduced blood levels of glucose, insulin and cholesterol. Although previous studies have associated vitamin D, which is manufactured in the skin when it is exposed to UV light, with weight loss, vitamin D was not the hero of this story. Instead, the researchers found that increased levels of nitric oxide resulting from UV exposure were responsible for the improvements seen. Nitric oxide is known to reduce blood pressure and benefit the heart and blood vessels, but it also regulates the body’s basic metabolic rate and the burning of glucose and fats for energy.

The results of this study need to be interpreted cautiously, since mice are nocturnal animals covered in fur, so their skin isn’t normally exposed to UV light. However, it does suggest that the nitric oxide produced in our skin by sunshine, in addition to the vitamin D, could have important health benefits for people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome.

At this time of year, the sunshine may not be strong enough in the UK to produce much vitamin D, but you could still benefit from some nitric oxide production. Getting outside on fine days and exercising in the fresh air – whether it’s a run, walk, cycle ride or a kick-about with a football – can do you a power of good in other ways, too. To remind yourself of the many benefits of exercise, see my earlier post here.

While exercise and sunshine are free for everyone, Big Pharma would prefer you to take its patented drugs. The latest one to get approval is called Trulicity – an innocent and appealing name for a particularly dangerous medication that could cause thyroid cancer and other tumours. In my next blog post I shall explain why Trulicity is truly one you should avoid.

Wishing you the best of health,

Martin Hum
PhD DHD Nutritionist
for Real Diabetes Truth

Bear in mind we are not addressing anyone’s personal situation and you should rely on this for informational purposes only. Please consult with your own physician before acting on any recommendations contained herein.

References
1. Narendran P, Solomon TP, Kennedy A, Chimen M, Andrews RC. The time has come to test the beta cell preserving effects of exercise in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia. 2014 Nov 4 (Online ahead of print).

2. Geldenhuys S, Hart PH, Endersby R, Jacoby P, Feelisch M, Weller RB, Matthews V, Gorman S. Ultraviolet radiation suppresses obesity and symptoms of metabolic syndrome independently of vitamin D in mice fed a high-fat diet. Diabetes. 2014; 63(11):3759-3769.

Help For Menopausal Mood Swings And Depression

Another reason to supplement Vit D ?
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Menopausal mood swings are no joke – ask those living with a menopausal woman – and if you are also suffering symptoms of oestrogen dominance then it may seem like you are trapped by your moods. Hormone balance is important here, bioidentical natural progesterone is a natural mood enhancer that also helps sleep. When in combination with the right balance of natural oestrogen then that has shown to be effective for women with severe mood swings and depression.

However, as well as getting your hormones balanced, there is one thing you can do right away and it is look at whether you have a lack of vitamin D as that also can affect mood swings.
Over the last year it seemed as if you couldn’t open a newspaper without some new benefit of vitamin D being hailed – in fact it has been described as a wonder vitamin. We know we need it for strong bones and maintaining muscle mass, but it also is being studied for diabetes, heart disease, various cancers and immune response.

Twenty minutes of sun exposure a day is recommended to get optimal minimum amounts of vitamin D but in northern climes like the UK we are unlikely to get the amount that we need, though this year seems to be the exception! Figures from the USA indicate that less than 10% of the population get the recommended daily amount and they are mostly outdoor workers who get the benefit of any sunshine that is going.

Women and Mood
At the The Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in June, 2014 it was reported that a substantial new benefit of vitamin D has been discovered. Women with moderate to severe depression had substantial improvement in their symptoms of depression after they received treatment for their vitamin D deficiency according to a new benefit of vitamin D has been discovered. Women with moderate to severe depression had substantial improvement in their symptoms of depression after they received treatment for their vitamin D deficiency according to a new study.
This came from a very small study of women aged 42-66 who had previously been diagnosed with clinical depression. The women did not change their antidepressant medications, or other environmental factors that relate to depression, and over 8-12 weeks were given oral vitamin D. This gave them normal levels after treatment and all the women reported significant improvement in their depression.

How to help yourself
Other studies have suggested that vitamin D has an effect on mood and depression and given the amount of research being done on other additional benefits of vitamin D, it may be worth considering.
Other factors that affect mood are lack of sleep at menopause due to hot flashes and night sweats and increased stress levels. Tackling both of these can help as will eliminating or reducing stimulants such as caffeine, alcohol and tobacco as these can make a real difference to mood stability.

Many women report improvements in both mood swings and sleep when helped with bioidentical natural progesterone, and if you are at risk of vitamin D deficiency it would make sense to consider supplementation to maximize the effect of the natural hormone.

Vitamin D is not readily available from food but varieties of oily fish have the most followed by much smaller amounts in liver, all types of milk, yoghurt and cheese. Many brands of orange juice, yogurt, margarine, and breakfast cereals are often fortified with vitamin D but this is not a source to rely on if you are deficient.

Nutritionist Patrck Holford recommends that those who live in the northern hemisphere, have decreased bone mass (osteoporosis) or a cancer risk, have a 25mg capsule a day or one drop of an oral vitamin D supplement.

Vitamin D – Why?

I thought I would repost this as it’s the time of year to start supplementing your sunshine!

Vitamin D – Why?

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Last winter I was lucky enough to have a week in Barbados, This year I will need to supplement this important nutrient. I use a mouth spray as it tastes great, is good value and very easy to use. In the UK we are too far north on planet Earth to get enough UVB from the sun for at least half the year to make enough Vitamin D – even though your body will make it from just a few minutes of sunshine on your skin, you need to actually expose it.
Many of us avoid the sun for fear of ageing and so use moisturisers and make-up with sun screens that we lack this essential element in our diets.
Unless you are VERY fair – a red head, with many moles – your chance of skin cancer is very low. Your beautician will want you to buy everything with a sunscreen in it – but they aren’t thinking about your overall health – just your appearance!

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NOTE: may help (can’t hurt) with weight loss!

Effective for:
Treating conditions that cause weak and painful bones (osteomalacia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood (familial hypophosphatemia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood due to a disease called Fanconi syndrome.
Psoriasis (with a specialized prescription-only form of vitamin D).
Low blood calcium levels because of a low parathyroid thyroid hormone levels.
Helping prevent low calcium and bone loss (renal osteodystrophy) in people with kidney failure.
Rickets.
Vitamin D deficiency.

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Likely Effective for:
Treating osteoporosis (weak bones). Taking a specific form of vitamin D called cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) along with calcium seems to help prevent bone loss and bone breaks.
Preventing falls in older people. Researchers noticed that people who don’t have enough vitamin D tend to fall more often than other people. They found that taking a vitamin D supplement reduces the risk of falling by up to 22%. Higher doses of vitamin D are more effective than lower doses. One study found that taking 800 IU of vitamin D reduced the risk of falling, but lower doses didn’t.

Also, vitamin D, in combination with calcium, but not calcium alone, may prevent falls by decreasing body sway and blood pressure. This combination prevents more falls in women than men.
Reducing bone loss in people taking drugs called corticosteroids.

Possibly Effective for:
Reducing the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies show taking vitamin D seems to reduce women’s risk of getting MS by up to 40%. Taking at least 400 IU per day, the amount typically found in a multivitamin supplement, seems to work the best.
Preventing cancer. Some research shows that people who take a high-dose vitamin D supplement plus calcium might have a lower chance of developing cancer of any type.
Weight loss. Women taking calcium plus vitamin D are more likely to lose weight and maintain their weight. But this benefit is mainly in women who didn’t get enough calcium before they started taking supplements.
Respiratory infections. Clinical research in school aged children shows that taking a vitamin D supplement during winter might reduce the chance of getting seasonal flu. Other research suggests that taking a vitamin D supplement might reduce the chance of an asthma attack triggered by a cold or other respiratory infection. Some additional research suggests that children with low levels of vitamin D have a higher chance of getting a respiratory infection such as the common cold or flu.
Reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in older women.
Reducing bone loss in women with a condition called hyperparathyroidism.
Preventing tooth loss in the elderly.

How Much?
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
For preventing osteoporosis and fractures: 400-1000 IU per day has been used for older adults. Some experts recommended higher doses of 1000-2000 IU daily.
For preventing falls: 800-1000 IU/day has been used in combination with calcium 1000-1200 mg/day.
For preventing multiple sclerosis (MS): long-term consumption of at least 400 IU per day, mainly in the form of a multivitamin supplement, has been used.
For preventing all cancer types: calcium 1400-1500 mg/day plus vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 1100 IU/day in postmenopausal women has been used.
For muscle pain caused by medications called “statins”: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) or vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 50,000 units once a week or 400 IU daily.
For preventing the flu: vitamin D (cholecalciferol) 1200 IU daily.
Most vitamin supplements contain only 400 IU (10 mcg) vitamin D.

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The Institute of Medicine publishes recommended daily allowance (RDA), which is an estimate of the amount of vitamin D that meets the needs of most people in the population. The current RDA was set in 2010. The RDA varies based on age as follows: 1-70 years of age, 600 IU daily; 71 years and older, 800 IU daily; pregnant and lactating women, 600 IU daily. For infants ages 0-12 months, an adequate intake (AI) level of 400 IU is recommended.

Some organizations are recommending higher amounts. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the recommended minimum daily intake of vitamin D to 400 IU daily for all infants and children, including adolescents. Parents should not use vitamin D liquids dosed as 400 IU/drop. Giving one dropperful or mL by mistake can deliver 10,000 IU/day. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will force companies to provide no more than 400 IU per dropperful in the future.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends vitamin D 400 IU to 800 IU daily for adults under age 50, and 800 IU to 1000 IU daily for older adults.

The North American Menopause Society recommends 700 IU to 800 IU daily for women at risk of deficiency due to low sun (e.g., homebound, northern latitude) exposure.

Guidelines from the Osteoporosis Society of Canada recommend vitamin D 400 IU per day for people up to age 50, and 800 IU per day for people over 50. Osteoporosis Canada now recommends 400-1000 IU daily for adults under the age of 50 years and 800-2000 IU daily for adults over the age of 50 years.

The Canadian Cancer Society recommends 1000 IU/day during the fall and winter for adults in Canada. For those with a higher risk of having low vitamin D levels, this dose should be taken year round. This includes people who have dark skin, usually wear clothing that covers most of their skin, and people who are older or who don’t go outside often.

Many experts now recommend using vitamin D supplements containing cholecalciferol in order to meet these intake levels. This seems to be more potent than another form of vitamin D called ergocalciferol.

JaxAllenFitness

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3 Metabolism Tools

3 Easy Metabolism Tools

Use these tools to get healthy, get leaner, boost performance faster and ultimately boost your metabolism.

Tool #1 – Get Enough Sleep

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Sleep is perhaps the most under appreciated element of health, strength and fat loss.

It is responsible for the resetting and regulation of your hormonal system and for that reason it is critical in helping you to create a hormonal environment that supports a fast metabolism and rapid fat loss.

General Recommendations: Sleep a minimum of 6 hours per night with a goal of averaging 7.5-9 hours. Get the highest quality sleep you can by sleeping in a pitch black room and avoiding television and other bright dynamic lights for at least 30 minutes before bed.
If you have trouble falling asleep, focus your thoughts and decide you want to sleep, ALLOW yourself to sleep, practise belly breathing to get into a relaxed sate.
If your mind is racing – you will need to find coping skills to reduce your stress levels, but gentle music might help calm your thoughts.

I use a sleep app, with added features that also track my health, diet and activity status. The stats help me identify stressors and how best to remove them.

Tool #2 – Drink Lots Of Cold Water

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Most people don’t drink enough water to support their metabolism and detoxification. To start with you must drink enough water in order for your body to function properly.

In addition to quantity, by drinking your water cold (exclusively before meals, not after) you can accelerate your metabolism even further. This is accomplished through a process called thermogenic homeostasis.

What this means is your body likes to be a certain temperature, 98.6 degrees to be exact. When something forces your body to cool down below this temperature your body will react by producing heat.

This production of heat requires calories and so will increase your metabolism.

General Recommendations: Drink 32oz (1L) of fresh cold water first thing in the morning and 16oz (0.5L) of fresh cold water before each meal. Do not consume cold water after your meals as this can negatively affect digestion.

Tool #3 – Start Walking Daily

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Walking is perhaps the best add-on fat burning exercise EVER!

In addition to your HIIT and other Metabolic training walking will help flush blood through your muscles and help your body deal with the waste products of high intensity exercise.

By walking every day you can reduce stress, clear your head, get fresh air and absorb some much needed sunshine.

General Recommendations: Start by walking a minimum of 15 minutes every day. From there work up to 20+ minutes of brisk walking daily, preferably in an outdoor setting where you can get fresh air and sunshine.

Think about how you could walk at lunchtime…. Fresh air, an opportunity for a mind clearing break and your daily vitamin D!